• When?
  • Or

Now showing at Brewery Arts Centre 122a,Highgate,Kendal,Cumbria LA9 4HE 01539 725133

  • A Most Violent Year
  • Chef
  • Chocolat
  • Fifty Shades Of Grey
  • Sideways
  • The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
  • The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (Subtitled)

A Most Violent Year 4 stars

movie title

Abel Morales owns a fleet of oil transport trucks that carry valuable fuel to customers across the city. One of his trucks is hijacked and the driver Julian is been badly beaten. Threats to Abel's livelihood become personal, targeting his children and wife Anna, whose gangster father used to own the company. "Let me deal with this," pleads Abel. "You better," she retorts. "Because you won't like what's going to happen once I start getting involved."

  • GenreAction, Drama, Romance, Thriller
  • CastJessica Chastain, Oscar Isaac, David Oyelowo, Alessandro Nivola, Elyes Gabel, Albert Brooks.
  • DirectorJ C Chandor.
  • WriterJ C Chandor.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration125 mins
  • Official site
  • Release23/01/2015

According to statistics, 1981 was the most violent year in New York City history in relation to the population. Over the 12 months, more than 1.2 million crimes were recorded including 60,000 aggravated assaults, 5,400 forcible rapes and 2,220 murders.

A crack epidemic had the city in a chokehold and Mayor Ed Koch seemed powerless to curb gang warfare and spiralling lawlessness on the subway system. Writer-director JC Chandor, who was Oscar nominated for the 2012 thriller Margin Call, uses this turbulent period as a backdrop to his masterful and searing portrait of crime and brutal punishment.

Centred on a married couple, who are struggling to keep their heating oil distribution business afloat, A Most Violent Year powerfully conveys the personal and professional sacrifices of a devoted husband and wife, who become one of the shocking statistics.

The film's pacing is deceptively steady and slow, lulling us into a false sense of security as Chandor ups the stakes for his beautifully sketched characters, forcing them to take greater risks to protect their nearest and dearest.

Abel Morales (Oscar Isaac) owns a fleet of oil transport trucks that carry valuable fuel to customers across the city. He's a small player but hopes to expand by clinching a deal for property on the Brooklyn waterfront that will allow him to take delivery of oil from the river. Having put down 700,000 US dollars as a deposit, Abel has just 30 days to close the transaction or the vendor keeps the downpayment and can sell the land to a competitor.

Soon after, Abel learns that one of his trucks has been hijacked and the driver Julian (Elyes Gabel) has been badly beaten. Union rep Bill O'Leary (Peter Gerety) asks Abel to allow the drivers to carry unlicenced guns as a deterrent but the boss strongly objects, knowing that it will take just one stray bullet to arouse the suspicions of the crusading Assistant District Attorney (David Oyelowo).

Threats to Abel's livelihood become personal, targeting his children and wife Anna (Jessica Chastain), whose gangster father used to own the company.
"Let me deal with this," pleads Abel.
"You better," she retorts. "Because you won't like what's going to happen once I start getting involved."

A Most Violent Year hits a sweet spot on every level, from Chandor's measured direction and lean script, to the powerhouse performances. Isaac is mesmerising as an honourable family man, who refuses to sink to the depths of some of his rivals, sticking to the path of righteousness for as long as he dare.

Chastain essays another ballsy woman of substance, cutting through her husband's rose-tinted idealism with harsh home truths. When oblivion beckons for Abel and Anna, we discover the true strength of their moral compasses in the face of the corruption and senseless bloodshed.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 2nd March 2015
Tuesday 3rd March 2015
Wednesday 4th March 2015

This film is also showing at:

Chef 4 stars

movie title

When prestigious food critic and blogger Ramsey Michel makes a reservation at his restaurant, cook Carl Casper plans a daring new menu but the owner Riva forces him to cook his tried and tested signature dishes. The subsequent poor review sparks a bitter war of words between Carl engages Ramsey in on Twitter, which spirals out of control and results in Carl publicly quitting his job. Carl's ex-wife Inez suggests he rediscovers his culinary passion by starting a food truck.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, Romance
  • CastRobert Downey Jr, Jon Favreau, Scarlett Johansson, Bobby Cannavale, Dustin Hoffman, John Leguizamo, Sofia Vergara, Emjay Anthony.
  • DirectorJon Favreau.
  • WriterJon Favreau.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration114 mins
  • Official sitewww.chefthefilm.com
  • Release27/06/2014

If food be the music of love then Chef composes a mouth-watering symphony of Cuban flavours to delight the palate of audiences, who crave a heart-warming drama garnished with gentle humour. Written and directed by Jon Favreau, this uplifting confection works to a tried and tested recipe of triumph against adversity, and taps into the rising popularity of food trucks as a lunchtime hang-out for famished American office workers.

Snappily edited scenes of high quality produce being transformed into plates of calorie-loaded deliciousness make any hot dogs, nachos and popcorn from the concessions stand look bland by comparison.

Be grateful that the Smell-O-Vision and AromaRama systems, which heightened the immersive experience of films by releasing scents into the theatre, never gained traction otherwise Chef's 114-minute running time would be exquisite, stomach-rumbling agony.

By the end credits, your appetite was well and truly whetted for one of the film's Cubano pressed sandwiches filled with juicy roast pork, boiled ham and molten Swiss cheese. The culinary wizard responsible for this raging hunger is Carl Casper (Favreau), who is the star attraction at a Los Angeles restaurant owned by Riva (Dustin Hoffman).

Prestigious food critic Ramsey Michel (Oliver Platt), who reportedly sold his online blog for 10 million dollars, makes a reservation at the restaurant and Carl excitedly plans a new tasting menu with sous chef Tony (Bobby Cannavale), line cook Martin (John Leguizamo) and sassy hostess Molly (Scarlett Johansson).

"You know what I would do? Play your hits," argues Riva and he forces Carl to revert to his signature dishes. Ramsey's poor review, which berates Carl for resting on his laurels, ignites a bitter war of words on Twitter.

"You wouldn't know a good meal if it sat on your face!" the chef informs Ramsey. Their argument spirals out of control and Carl publicly quits his job. Ex-wife Inez (Sofia Vergara) invites Carl to accompany her and their young son Percy (Emjay Anthony) to Miami to reconnect with his roots.

In familiar surroundings, Carl entertains Inez's canny suggestion of a food truck and the chef transforms a worn-out vehicle into a mobile eaterie par excellence with help from Percy and Martin.

Chef wears its heart on its olive oil-spattered sleeve, establishing an emotional divide between Carl and his son, which might be bridged as they spend valuable time together on the road.

Social media assumes a pivotal role in the script and Favreau employs sparing visual effects to illustrate how Percy builds word of mouth for the food truck by harnessing the power of the internet. Favreau and Anthony are an adorable pairing, and Robert Downey Jr injects ribald humour to his fleeting scenes as Inez's germ-phobic first ex-husband.

Heartfelt scenes of confession and reconciliation ensure tears flow as freely as the overpriced vino from Riva's well stocked cellar.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Thursday 5th March 2015

Chocolat 4 stars

Vianne Rocher and her six-year-old daughter Anouk arrive in a quaint French village. Three days later, they open a marvellous chocolaterie, crammed with all manner of intoxicating drinks and confections which re-awaken the locals' long dormant desires. As the residents succumb to Vianne's cocoa creations, righteous nobleman Comte de Reynard begins a campaign to have the shop closed, dividing loyalties in the community.

  • GenreAction, Adaptation, Drama, Romance
  • CastJuliette Binoche, Johnny Depp, Alfred Molina.
  • DirectorLasse Hallstrom.
  • CountryUK/US
  • Duration121 mins
  • Official site
  • Release02/03/2001

Adapted from Joanne Harris's mouth-watering bestseller, Chocolat is a comic fable about temptation and the liberating power of the senses. Like its namesake, it is a deliciously sweet and dreamy confection, with a soft centre of romance and female empowerment. The North Wind blows through the quaint French village of Lansquenet, bringing with it Vianne Rocher (Juliette Binoche) and her six-year-old daughter Anouk (Victoire Thivisol). Viane is looking to set up shop in the village and leases a vacant building close to the church from cantankerous 70-year-old libertine Armande (Judi Dench). The villagers are both intrigued and wary of the outsiders in their midst, not least righteous local nobleman the Comte de Reynard (Alfred Molina) who enforces a strict code of abstinence and morality. Three days later, Vianne opens a marvellous and magical chocolaterie, crammed with all manner of intoxicating drinks and bon-bons which re-awaken locals' long dormant passions. Unhappy marriages are brought back from the dead, elderly Guillaume Blerot (John Wood) finally plucks up his courage to declare his affections for a neighbour, and long-suffering Josephine Muscat (Lena Olin) finally leaves her brutish, abusive husband Serge (Peter Stormare) to work alongside Vianne. As the residents succumb to Vianne's creamy cocoa creations, Reynard launches a campaign to have the shop closed, on the basis that she is encouraging a dangerous taste for freedom and wanton self-gratification. Loyalties are divided in the community, and when Vianne announces a grand festival of chocolate taking place on Easter Sunday of all days, war is officially declared between the two factions. The situation is exacerbated by the arrival of riverboat travellers close to the edge of town. Reynard wields his influence and persuades all of the shop-keepers to close their doors to the gypsies - everyone except Vianne who believes that everyone should be welcome at her chocolate shop. Especially dashing musician Roux (Depp) who awakens her own secret desire: to belong. Binoche leads the all-star cast with a charming and luminous performance, full of gentle humour. Her onscreen pairing with Depp, sporting a perfect Irish accent, generates enough heat to melt the entire contents of the chocolaterie. Enforcing her standing as a scene-stealer par excellence, Dench revels in her role as the colourful town eccentric who never misses an opportunity to speak her mind (regardless of the consequences). The vastly under-rated Olin is heart-breaking as the battered wife who struggles to free herself of her husband's vice-like grip, and Molina enjoys poking fun at his deluded puritan, sparring with Vianne to hilarious effect for the loyalty and respect of the masses. Lasse Hallstrom directs with a light touch, accentuating the comedy and the quirkier moments of small town life (bitter, dark and semi-sweet). He doesn't overplay the use of chocolate as a metaphor for the liberating powers of pleasure, stirring in delicious sequences of Vianne at work in the kitchen with bowls full of glistening molten chocolate. Chocolat is a joyous moral fable about tolerance and not denying oneself the finer things in life that melts on the palate like an exquisite truffle. So indulgence yourself in Hallstrom's film. You know you want to.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Wednesday 4th March 2015

Fifty Shades Of Grey 3 stars

movie title

As a favour to her roommate Kate, literature student Anastasia Steele interviews handsome and charming multimillionaire businessman Christian Grey. Anastasia is bewitched by Christian and makes clear her desire for him. In order to get closer to the object of her amorous affections, the student submits to Christian and he introduces her to an erotically charged world of submission, domination, lust and temptation.

  • GenreAdaptation, Romance, Thriller
  • CastDakota Johnson, Jennifer Ehle, Jamie Dornan, Rita Ora, Marcia Gay Harden.
  • DirectorSam Taylor-Johnson.
  • WriterKelly Marcel.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration125 mins
  • Official sitewww.fiftyshadesmovie.com
  • Release13/02/2015

With its simplistic storyline about a naive heroine drawn to a dark, brooding hunk, who conceals monstrous desires, Fifty Shades Of Grey is Twilight with riding crops and plush furnishings. Sam Taylor-Johnson's flaccid film version of the EL James literary sensation preaches to the perverted in soft-core whimpers and sighs. Editor Lisa Gunning gently caresses each glossy sequence of writhing appendages to the strains of Danny Elfman's score or a soaring ballad from Annie Lennox and Sia. "Got me looking so crazy in love," purrs Beyonce beneath the picture's first impeccably lit montage of gym-toned flesh on flesh. Sadly the carnal abandon in her lyrics fails to translate as lustful hanky-spanky on the big screen. The plot is handcuffed tightly to the book. As a favour to her flu-riddled roommate Kate (Eloise Mumford), English Literature student Anastasia Steele (Dakota Johnson) interviews handsome billionaire Christian Grey (Jamie Dornan) for an article in the university newspaper. Anastasia is intoxicated but Christian initially pushes her away. "I'm not the man for you. You have to steer clear of me," he whispers. Irresistibly drawn to the businessman, Anastasia agrees to a date and Christian spirits her away to his red room festooned with S&M toys via a flight on his private helicopter. As she takes her first ride on his chopper to the throb of Ellie Goulding's chart-topping hit Love Me Like You Do, Taylor-Johnson's film reduces to an orgy of product placements and glossy fantasies that wouldn't look too shabby as TV commercials for luxury cars, designer fragrances or crumbly, flaky confectionery. Only in Taylor-Johnson's film, the beautiful heroine, who bites her lower lip as lazy shorthand for anticipatory sexual pleasure, wants to unwrap Dornan's sculpted torso rather than a glistening slab of milk chocolate. "I'm incapable of letting you go," confides Christian as he introduces wide-eyed Anastasia to his secret world of domination and submission, which didn't get UK censors hot under the collar, passing the film uncut. Nor me. I was more aroused by the immaculate shine on Christian's piano than anything in his boudoir of bondage: a set designer must have spent hours buffing those ivories. When Dornan and Johnson are fully clothed and enjoying comical scenes of flirtation, they kindle smouldering screen chemistry. As soon as one of them disrobes, those embers are extinguished. Kelly Marcel's script fails to flesh out the protagonists: Christian remains an enigma and Dornan gamely keeps a straight face as he barks lines like, "If you were mine, you wouldn't be able to sit down for a week." The usual sexual inequality about on-screen nudity applies. While Johnson is depicted full frontal, Dornan's johnson remains artfully hidden by his co-star's creamy thighs or high thread-count bed sheets. In an early scene, Ana's roommate excitedly demands the lowdown on Christian and the heroine coolly responds that he was nice, courteous and clean. That's a fair summation of the film: two hours of polite, functional, beautifully shot foreplay that fails to locate the G-spot.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 2nd March 2015
Tuesday 3rd March 2015
Wednesday 4th March 2015
Thursday 5th March 2015

This film is also showing at:

Sideways 4 stars

High school teacher and wine connoisseur Miles Raymond celebrates the impending marriage of his actor friend Jack by driving the pair of them off to California wine country for seven days of alcohol, food and golf. Jack intends to use the break for one final fling before tying the knot, and he is determined to find Miles a partner too. The perfect woman for Miles seems to be waitress Maya. However, Miles's lack of self-confidence continually stymies any romantic overtures.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, Romance
  • CastPaul Giamatti, Thomas Haden Church, Virginia Madsen, Sandra Oh.
  • DirectorAlexander Payne.
  • CountryUS
  • Duration127 mins
  • Official site
  • Release28/01/2005

There is a dark horse cantering hard on the rails at this year's Oscars, and its name is Sideways. Showered with countless rosettes from the critics, Alexander Payne's fourth feature as writer-director (after Citizen Ruth, Election and About Schmidt) is another bittersweet survey of the human condition, based on the novel by Rex Pickett. Here, Payne and co-writer Jim Taylor, focus on the romantic and sexual dalliances of two forty-something men, each burdened with insecurities and emotional scars. English teacher and wine connoisseur Miles Raymond (Paul Giamatti) celebrates the impending marriage of his vain actor buddy Jack (Thomas Haden Church) by driving the pair of them off to California wine country for seven days of alcohol, food and golf. As best man at Jack's impending wedding, Miles intends to show his former college roommate the best week of his life. Jack intends to use the break for one final fling before tying the knot, and he is determined to find Miles a partner too so that he can stop obsessing about his ex-wife. "My best man gift to you will be to get you laid," Jack tells him cheerily. The perfect woman for Miles seems to be waitress Maya (Virginia Madsen), whom the teacher has admired from afar for months. She is beautiful, vivacious, well on her way to achieving a graduate degree in horticulture, and is equally passionate about vino. In short, she is perfect. However, Miles's lack of self-confidence continually stymies any romantic overtures. Meanwhile, Jack enjoys a passionate dalliance between the sheets with Maya's friend Stephanie (Sandra Oh), neglecting to mention the fact he has a fiancee waiting for him at home. Comic misunderstanding follows missed opportunity as these four people search for lasting happiness and a really great pinot noir. Sideways is a beautifully crafted film and the performances are exemplary but with so much hype and expectation riding on such a small movie, it's difficult not to feel a little disappointed. For my money, Million Dollar Baby wins it by a nose. The 127 minute running time feels a tad long and Payne occasionally breaks the heady spell with an unlikely flight of fancy, like Miles breaking into an overweight waitress's apartment to retrieve Jack's stolen wallet, and interrupting the woman and her burly boyfriend in delicto flagrante. Giamatti is heartbreaking as the loner who doesn't feel worthy of a good woman's affections and he generates a wonderful screen chemistry with Madsen, forged by some stunning dialogue. "What's the title?" asks Maya, referring to Miles's unpublished 'masterpiece'. "The Day After Yesterday," he replies proudly. She pauses, "Oh... You mean today?" The fractious relationship between Jack and Miles also gives rise to some great quips and one-liners, most of them delivered with obvious glee by Haden Church, like when Jack demonstrates his appreciation of wine with the classic: "Pinot noir? Then why is it white?" Or when he worries that drunken Miles may have telephoned his ex-wife, "Did you drink and dial?" He did, and it wasn't pretty. Church is in show-stopping form as the blond womanizer in the prime of his bed-hopping middle-aged life and Oh rounds out the cast wonderfully as a fiery-tempered vixen who doesn't take too kindly to Jack's deception. All of the romantic to-ing and fro-ing culminates in a final shot that proves Payne is a director who knows how to leave his audience wanting more.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Tuesday 3rd March 2015

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel 4 stars

movie title

Sonny and his business partner Muriel consider expanding into a second hotel to cope with demand, aided by Douglas and Evelyn. The arrival of an American writer called Guy sends Madge into a swoon while Sonny has lots to keep him occupied with his impending nuptials to the beautiful Sunaina. Douglas and Evelyn's romance continues to develop but the course of true love, even in twilight years, never runs smooth.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, Romance
  • CastRichard Gere, Bill Nighy, Dame Maggie Smith, Ronald Pickup, Tamsin Greig, Penelope Wilton, Dev Patel, Tena Desae, Dame Judi Dench, Celia Imrie, Lillete Dubey.
  • DirectorJohn Madden.
  • WriterOl Parker.
  • CountryUS/UK
  • Duration122 mins
  • Official sitewww.facebook.com/marigoldhotel
  • Release26/02/2015

Towards the end of The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, a secret inspector is asked for an honest assessment of Jaipur's luxury development for residents in their golden years. The inspector concludes that behind the scenes, management of the hotel is shambolic but unerring affection for the staff makes it a four-star destination for "the elderly and beautiful".

The same honest appraisal applies to John Madden's entertaining sequel: Ol Parker's script is haphazard and several plot strands are flimsy but our emotional investment in the characters papers over the cracks.

Audiences who check in to this second chapter will be treated to the same pungent Jaipur backdrops and good-humoured service, with a fresh lick of dramatic paint courtesy of new arrivals, played with easy-going charm by Tamsin Greig and Richard Gere.

The dashing star of American Gigolo and Pretty Woman takes on sex symbol status here, causing groom-to-be Sonny (Dev Patel) to quip, "The man is so handsome, he has me urgently questioning my own sexuality." At 65 years old, Gere evidently still has it.

While the first film was lovingly adapted from Deborah Moggach's novel These Foolish Things, The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel tumbles straight out of the scriptwriter Parker's imagination. He struggles to provide each resident with a compelling narrative arc: some are surplus to requirements while others relish the trials and tribulations that test fledgling romances and fractious friendships to breaking point.

Sonny and business partner Muriel (Maggie Smith) travel abroad to seek investment for a second hotel from business chief Ty Burley (David Strathairn) and return to India, mindful that funding is dependent on a review from a secret inspector.
"How was America?" asks Evelyn (Judi Dench), welcoming them home.
"It made death more tempting," retorts Muriel.

English traveller Lavinia (Greig) and American novelist Guy (Gere) arrive soon after and Sonny is convinced that Guy must be the inspector so he ignores Lavinia and lavishes attention on the writer. Guy's arrival sends Madge (Celia Imrie) into a swoon - "Lordy lord, have mercy on my ovaries!" she swoons - while Douglas (Bill Nighy) struggles to communicate his feelings to Evelyn.

Meanwhile, Sonny is pre-occupied with his impending nuptials to Sunaina (Tina Desai) and a simmering rivalry for his fiancee's affections from snake-hipped family friend Kush (Shazad Latif).

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel delivers the same winning formula of laughter and tears, eliciting strong performances from Dench, Nighy and Smith at her acid-tongued, indomitable best.

The course of true love, even in twilight years, never runs smooth and Parker composes variations on a theme of amour, while peppering his script with pithy one-liners. "There is no present like the time," professes one wise soul. Madden's film is certainly a gift: you get everything you expect but nothing more.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Monday 2nd March 2015
Tuesday 3rd March 2015
Wednesday 4th March 2015
Thursday 5th March 2015

This film is also showing at:

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (Subtitled) 4 stars

movie title

Sonny and his business partner Muriel consider expanding into a second hotel to cope with demand, aided by Douglas and Evelyn. The arrival of an American writer called Guy sends Madge into a swoon while Sonny has lots to keep him occupied with his impending nuptials to the beautiful Sunaina. Douglas and Evelyn's romance continues to develop but the course of true love, even in twilight years, never runs smooth.

  • GenreComedy, Drama, Romance
  • CastDame Maggie Smith, Richard Gere, Ronald Pickup, Tamsin Greig, Penelope Wilton, Dev Patel, Tena Desae, Bill Nighy, Dame Judi Dench, Celia Imrie, Lillete Dubey.
  • DirectorJohn Madden.
  • WriterOl Parker.
  • CountryUS/UK
  • Duration122 mins
  • Official sitewww.facebook.com/marigoldhotel
  • Release26/02/2015

Towards the end of The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, a secret inspector is asked for an honest assessment of Jaipur's luxury development for residents in their golden years. The inspector concludes that behind the scenes, management of the hotel is shambolic but unerring affection for the staff makes it a four-star destination for "the elderly and beautiful".

The same honest appraisal applies to John Madden's entertaining sequel: Ol Parker's script is haphazard and several plot strands are flimsy but our emotional investment in the characters papers over the cracks.

Audiences who check in to this second chapter will be treated to the same pungent Jaipur backdrops and good-humoured service, with a fresh lick of dramatic paint courtesy of new arrivals, played with easy-going charm by Tamsin Greig and Richard Gere.

The dashing star of American Gigolo and Pretty Woman takes on sex symbol status here, causing groom-to-be Sonny (Dev Patel) to quip, "The man is so handsome, he has me urgently questioning my own sexuality." At 65 years old, Gere evidently still has it.

While the first film was lovingly adapted from Deborah Moggach's novel These Foolish Things, The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel tumbles straight out of the scriptwriter Parker's imagination. He struggles to provide each resident with a compelling narrative arc: some are surplus to requirements while others relish the trials and tribulations that test fledgling romances and fractious friendships to breaking point.

Sonny and business partner Muriel (Maggie Smith) travel abroad to seek investment for a second hotel from business chief Ty Burley (David Strathairn) and return to India, mindful that funding is dependent on a review from a secret inspector.
"How was America?" asks Evelyn (Judi Dench), welcoming them home.
"It made death more tempting," retorts Muriel.

English traveller Lavinia (Greig) and American novelist Guy (Gere) arrive soon after and Sonny is convinced that Guy must be the inspector so he ignores Lavinia and lavishes attention on the writer. Guy's arrival sends Madge (Celia Imrie) into a swoon - "Lordy lord, have mercy on my ovaries!" she swoons - while Douglas (Bill Nighy) struggles to communicate his feelings to Evelyn.

Meanwhile, Sonny is pre-occupied with his impending nuptials to Sunaina (Tina Desai) and a simmering rivalry for his fiancee's affections from snake-hipped family friend Kush (Shazad Latif).

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel delivers the same winning formula of laughter and tears, eliciting strong performances from Dench, Nighy and Smith at her acid-tongued, indomitable best.

The course of true love, even in twilight years, never runs smooth and Parker composes variations on a theme of amour, while peppering his script with pithy one-liners. "There is no present like the time," professes one wise soul. Madden's film is certainly a gift: you get everything you expect but nothing more.

Showtimes (Click time to book tickets)

Thursday 5th March 2015
About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree