New Year damp squib for sales as shops and shoppers stay switched off in Kendal

The Westmorland Gazette: Shopping free zone - Kendal town centre today Shopping free zone - Kendal town centre today

THE few bargain hunters who ventured into Kendal today found buying opportunities thin on the ground as key retailers decided not to bother opening.

Although shop chains often use New Year's Day to kick off their January sales, some of big names decided to keep their doors firmly shut in the town.

Beales department store and TK Maxx were perhaps the highest profile openers, while outlets whose doors remained firmly shut included Marks and Spencer, Next and Burton.

The Westmorland Shopping Centre and shops in Elephant Yard also remained closed, although on the edge of the town centre K Village was open to business.

One Kendal shop that found it worthwhile opening was Bensons for Beds.

Retail manager Paul Stockdale said: "We open on both Boxing Day and New Year's Day every year and this year found trade quite good on both days."

Comments (12)

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3:30pm Tue 1 Jan 13

worldsgonemad says...

Not sure why people would bother going out today when the sales have been on in some places for a week already!
Not sure why people would bother going out today when the sales have been on in some places for a week already! worldsgonemad
  • Score: 0

4:21pm Tue 1 Jan 13

Cas220 says...

I honestly thought the shops would be closed today.
I honestly thought the shops would be closed today. Cas220
  • Score: 0

6:20pm Tue 1 Jan 13

nickjohn says...

My wife works in the retail sector, this year she has had to put up with longer hours and a drop in hourly pay.
She has worked christmas eve, the period between christmas and new year, including new years eve..

As a family we are grateful for her employer to decide not to open today so that she could spend a day with us over what is supposed to be a time of festive cheer.

Far too many people forget that just because they are on holiday others are not and its this selfish attitude that means families miss out on being together when they should be relaxing and enjoying themselves....
My wife works in the retail sector, this year she has had to put up with longer hours and a drop in hourly pay. She has worked christmas eve, the period between christmas and new year, including new years eve.. As a family we are grateful for her employer to decide not to open today so that she could spend a day with us over what is supposed to be a time of festive cheer. Far too many people forget that just because they are on holiday others are not and its this selfish attitude that means families miss out on being together when they should be relaxing and enjoying themselves.... nickjohn
  • Score: 0

9:57pm Tue 1 Jan 13

Periodic Mabel says...

This story seems to have been researched by walking around Kendal town centre. There are no interviews with retailers or facts about sales volumes for example. Sounds like a reporter went on an abortive shopping trip on their day off and decided to vent their spleen because everyone else was having the day off as well!
This story seems to have been researched by walking around Kendal town centre. There are no interviews with retailers or facts about sales volumes for example. Sounds like a reporter went on an abortive shopping trip on their day off and decided to vent their spleen because everyone else was having the day off as well! Periodic Mabel
  • Score: 0

12:29pm Wed 2 Jan 13

jazzactivist says...

I can't imagine why anyone would want to go shopping on Boxing Day or New Years Day. They are meant to be festive days for relaxing and being with family and friends, not shopping which can be done throughout the rest of the year. Even new year sales usually go on for the month of January, so why the rush. Retail and restaurant staff need the break as well.
I can't imagine why anyone would want to go shopping on Boxing Day or New Years Day. They are meant to be festive days for relaxing and being with family and friends, not shopping which can be done throughout the rest of the year. Even new year sales usually go on for the month of January, so why the rush. Retail and restaurant staff need the break as well. jazzactivist
  • Score: 0

1:01pm Wed 2 Jan 13

Kendmoor says...

I have to agree with Periodic Mabel..sounds like this is just the reporters rant. Frankly Its a little tiring all this commerical crap - I just wish I could get my partner to agree to push back christmas a few days, we do all our shopping in these so called "sales" and save a bit of cash.
I have to agree with Periodic Mabel..sounds like this is just the reporters rant. Frankly Its a little tiring all this commerical crap - I just wish I could get my partner to agree to push back christmas a few days, we do all our shopping in these so called "sales" and save a bit of cash. Kendmoor
  • Score: 0

1:29pm Wed 2 Jan 13

life cycle too says...

jazzactivist wrote:
I can't imagine why anyone would want to go shopping on Boxing Day or New Years Day. They are meant to be festive days for relaxing and being with family and friends, not shopping which can be done throughout the rest of the year. Even new year sales usually go on for the month of January, so why the rush. Retail and restaurant staff need the break as well.
Perhaps those people from other cultures who do not observe the same religious holidays or calenders would appreciate the chance to shop?

A lot of people who work on the festive days like the chance to shop when they get a day off, and as long as there are employees who are willing to work without being cajoled into doing so, then why not.
My parents live in France, and had their mail delivered on Boxing Day, so it clearly is not a universal holiday Day.
[quote][p][bold]jazzactivist[/bold] wrote: I can't imagine why anyone would want to go shopping on Boxing Day or New Years Day. They are meant to be festive days for relaxing and being with family and friends, not shopping which can be done throughout the rest of the year. Even new year sales usually go on for the month of January, so why the rush. Retail and restaurant staff need the break as well.[/p][/quote]Perhaps those people from other cultures who do not observe the same religious holidays or calenders would appreciate the chance to shop? A lot of people who work on the festive days like the chance to shop when they get a day off, and as long as there are employees who are willing to work without being cajoled into doing so, then why not. My parents live in France, and had their mail delivered on Boxing Day, so it clearly is not a universal holiday Day. life cycle too
  • Score: 0

4:19pm Wed 2 Jan 13

Spotty Fish says...

Seriously life cycle? You really believe that all the shop assistants working on Boxing Day and New Years Day are there because they can think of no better way to spend the day? That they are there because they want to be? That they don't feel obliged to be there because it's what is expected of them by their bosses? You really think they are all there because they are willing to work?

No, they are all there because if they refused to work or said they weren't willing, they probably wouldn't have a job.

And as for people from other cultures and religions. Please, surely it should be a case of respecting and accepting our traditions, as I would theirs?

I really suggest you think carefully about your previous post, and the implications of what you are saying for a lot of people.
Seriously life cycle? You really believe that all the shop assistants working on Boxing Day and New Years Day are there because they can think of no better way to spend the day? That they are there because they want to be? That they don't feel obliged to be there because it's what is expected of them by their bosses? You really think they are all there because they are willing to work? No, they are all there because if they refused to work or said they weren't willing, they probably wouldn't have a job. And as for people from other cultures and religions. Please, surely it should be a case of respecting and accepting our traditions, as I would theirs? I really suggest you think carefully about your previous post, and the implications of what you are saying for a lot of people. Spotty Fish
  • Score: 0

7:54pm Wed 2 Jan 13

life cycle too says...

In the past, I worked Christmas Day and New Years Days until I had a family of my own - it was a pleasant task and better paid than regular days.

Now I am self employed, and have to work whenever my customers provide work for me to do. I don't feel forced, it just makes good business sense.

I still know many people like me who are happy to work on Boxing Days and New Years Day with no coercion on the part of their employers, so I guess you must move in different circles - you seem to imply that there is a Dickensian order amongst employers.

There are of course many businesses in this area, open on Sundays, run by non Christians who are happy to open for trade, and likely see Christmas as a further opportunity!
In the past, I worked Christmas Day and New Years Days until I had a family of my own - it was a pleasant task and better paid than regular days. Now I am self employed, and have to work whenever my customers provide work for me to do. I don't feel forced, it just makes good business sense. I still know many people like me who are happy to work on Boxing Days and New Years Day with no coercion on the part of their employers, so I guess you must move in different circles - you seem to imply that there is a Dickensian order amongst employers. There are of course many businesses in this area, open on Sundays, run by non Christians who are happy to open for trade, and likely see Christmas as a further opportunity! life cycle too
  • Score: 0

9:00pm Wed 2 Jan 13

nickjohn says...

life cycle too wrote:
In the past, I worked Christmas Day and New Years Days until I had a family of my own - it was a pleasant task and better paid than regular days.

Now I am self employed, and have to work whenever my customers provide work for me to do. I don't feel forced, it just makes good business sense.

I still know many people like me who are happy to work on Boxing Days and New Years Day with no coercion on the part of their employers, so I guess you must move in different circles - you seem to imply that there is a Dickensian order amongst employers.

There are of course many businesses in this area, open on Sundays, run by non Christians who are happy to open for trade, and likely see Christmas as a further opportunity!
Over the years I have worked Chris¬¬tmas Day, Boxing Day, New Years day or any other day which was required but I soon realised that my family life meant more on special occasions than the whim of a customer.

Yes I know that as a self employed person the customer comes first as they pay the bills etc etc but I have been self employed for some 30 years and have grown to realise that customers come and customers go and in this day and age have very little loyalty, how many people still shop in the corner shop or on the high street instead of going to the super market, yet your family is forever....

Now I find myself having a wife who must work over the festive period because her large, faceless, corporate bosses say she must (this is whilst the MD of the firm suns themselves on a beach).. Whilst bank holiday pay of time and a half sounds great when its based around a minimum wage it is not that much after tax and NI and when it is not paid until the end of January loses a lot of its charm..

Yes we all know there are non Christians out there happy to work on our religious festivals but there are also non Christians out there that shut up shop on their religious festivals and we don't go round moaning about it we just accept it.
[quote][p][bold]life cycle too[/bold] wrote: In the past, I worked Christmas Day and New Years Days until I had a family of my own - it was a pleasant task and better paid than regular days. Now I am self employed, and have to work whenever my customers provide work for me to do. I don't feel forced, it just makes good business sense. I still know many people like me who are happy to work on Boxing Days and New Years Day with no coercion on the part of their employers, so I guess you must move in different circles - you seem to imply that there is a Dickensian order amongst employers. There are of course many businesses in this area, open on Sundays, run by non Christians who are happy to open for trade, and likely see Christmas as a further opportunity![/p][/quote]Over the years I have worked Chris¬¬tmas Day, Boxing Day, New Years day or any other day which was required but I soon realised that my family life meant more on special occasions than the whim of a customer. Yes I know that as a self employed person the customer comes first as they pay the bills etc etc but I have been self employed for some 30 years and have grown to realise that customers come and customers go and in this day and age have very little loyalty, how many people still shop in the corner shop or on the high street instead of going to the super market, yet your family is forever.... Now I find myself having a wife who must work over the festive period because her large, faceless, corporate bosses say she must (this is whilst the MD of the firm suns themselves on a beach).. Whilst bank holiday pay of time and a half sounds great when its based around a minimum wage it is not that much after tax and NI and when it is not paid until the end of January loses a lot of its charm.. Yes we all know there are non Christians out there happy to work on our religious festivals but there are also non Christians out there that shut up shop on their religious festivals and we don't go round moaning about it we just accept it. nickjohn
  • Score: 0

3:23pm Thu 3 Jan 13

life cycle too says...

I agree - I don't expect shops to open, I just appreciate why some would chose to shop on those days which traditionally have been holiday periods.

The world we live in is changing - the internet has put pressure on shops - but delivery services have so far struggled to cope with the increased demand on their services, providing an opportunity for shops to exploit that weakness - and sticking to traditional standards might hinder that.

The loss of COMET may well worry some large chains - and will no doubt worry employees more, but the answer is in both their hands.
I agree - I don't expect shops to open, I just appreciate why some would chose to shop on those days which traditionally have been holiday periods. The world we live in is changing - the internet has put pressure on shops - but delivery services have so far struggled to cope with the increased demand on their services, providing an opportunity for shops to exploit that weakness - and sticking to traditional standards might hinder that. The loss of COMET may well worry some large chains - and will no doubt worry employees more, but the answer is in both their hands. life cycle too
  • Score: 0

4:39pm Thu 3 Jan 13

nickjohn says...

life cycle too wrote:
I agree - I don't expect shops to open, I just appreciate why some would chose to shop on those days which traditionally have been holiday periods.

The world we live in is changing - the internet has put pressure on shops - but delivery services have so far struggled to cope with the increased demand on their services, providing an opportunity for shops to exploit that weakness - and sticking to traditional standards might hinder that.

The loss of COMET may well worry some large chains - and will no doubt worry employees more, but the answer is in both their hands.
"The loss of COMET may well worry some large chains - and will no doubt worry employees more, but the answer is in both their hands."

The chain my wife works for have seen sales increase beyond expectation due to the close of COMET and are exploiting the lack of availability of white goods such as fridges, freezers, washers etc etc...
[quote][p][bold]life cycle too[/bold] wrote: I agree - I don't expect shops to open, I just appreciate why some would chose to shop on those days which traditionally have been holiday periods. The world we live in is changing - the internet has put pressure on shops - but delivery services have so far struggled to cope with the increased demand on their services, providing an opportunity for shops to exploit that weakness - and sticking to traditional standards might hinder that. The loss of COMET may well worry some large chains - and will no doubt worry employees more, but the answer is in both their hands.[/p][/quote]"The loss of COMET may well worry some large chains - and will no doubt worry employees more, but the answer is in both their hands." The chain my wife works for have seen sales increase beyond expectation due to the close of COMET and are exploiting the lack of availability of white goods such as fridges, freezers, washers etc etc... nickjohn
  • Score: 0

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