Tips to tradesmen on the decline

The tradition of the ‘Christmas box’ is now practiced by less than half of people in the UK, new research has revealed.

The ‘Christmas box’ is a present given to tradespeople and employees during the festive season. And of all the trades who receive a cash gift from grateful customers, hairdressers are rewarded the most often at this time of year.

A study by budgeting account provider thinkmoney (http://www.thinkmoney.co.uk) found that just over a fifth of people tip their hairdresser (23%) at Christmas (that’s equivalent to over 11 million happy clients).

Postmen are the next most likely trade to receive a festive tip (22%), followed by bin men (15%) and window cleaners (12%).

Milkmen are at the bottom of the list (11%), although this may suggest that fewer residents have milk delivered to their door.

Older people are more inclined to give their hairdresser extra cash in December, according to thinkmoney. More than 30% of over-55s said they tipped the person who does their hair, compared to just 17% of those aged between 18 and 24.

Across the country, people living in the West Midlands are most likely to dip their hand in their pocket for the postman at Christmas, while London residents are more likely to tip their bin men during the festive period than people elsewhere in the country.

Meanwhile, the amount that people decide to tip tradespeople also varies. thinkmoney discovered that, of the people who do opt for the ‘Christmas box’, the majority (65.6%) give up to £10.

Only 6.4% give more than a tenner, and just over a quarter (28%) prefer to give something other than cash, like food or drink.

When it comes to tips of over £10, people living in London are the most likely to dig deep (16.9% compared to 1.3% of East Anglican residents).

Just over half of people asked said they didn’t tip anyone at Christmas time.

Ian Williams, director of communications at budgeting account provider thinkmoney, said: “The Christmas box is a lovely tradition and a great way to show your appreciation to hard working tradespeople. But with household budgets under increasing pressure it is perhaps no surprise that less than half of those we questioned leave a tip nowadays.”

Comments (4)

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10:46am Mon 16 Dec 13

shirtbox2003 says...

why should we give tips and Christmas pots to people who nowadays are paid quite well.the problem today is that everything is so expensive we have little left to give.as for service charges in restaurants mainly in larger towns,well this should be banned its like when you go into a shop for say a loaf at £1-30 and then being asked for 13p for being served.what nonsence.
why should we give tips and Christmas pots to people who nowadays are paid quite well.the problem today is that everything is so expensive we have little left to give.as for service charges in restaurants mainly in larger towns,well this should be banned its like when you go into a shop for say a loaf at £1-30 and then being asked for 13p for being served.what nonsence. shirtbox2003

6:01pm Mon 16 Dec 13

snuggle-bunny says...

well if we buy new lightweight laptop computers for councilors why not give someone who actually provides a good service a tip. I know where my money would be most appreciated
well if we buy new lightweight laptop computers for councilors why not give someone who actually provides a good service a tip. I know where my money would be most appreciated snuggle-bunny

7:57pm Mon 16 Dec 13

jazzactivist says...

Why not tip someone who has given you good service throughout the year , or even throughout a meal, though? I leave a Christmas Box - a card with money in - for our milkman, window cleaner, bin men, and postman, as I think they do an a good job in all sorts of inclement weather, especially the milkman who never misses a night even in an icy blizzard! I always tip in restaurants too if the service has been good, and I've rarely had bad service. It isn't about boosting wages, (it's been illegal for restaurants and hotels to use tips to make up wages since Oct 2008), but about an extra little thank you for taking extra trouble in poor working conditions.

I understand if some people genuinely feel that they don't have the money to give a Christmas Box, but a card with a nice message and a few sweets in it is just as good. If it makes someone feel valued, then why not? After all, bankers get bonuses from our money and we can't even say that they give good service!
Why not tip someone who has given you good service throughout the year , or even throughout a meal, though? I leave a Christmas Box - a card with money in - for our milkman, window cleaner, bin men, and postman, as I think they do an a good job in all sorts of inclement weather, especially the milkman who never misses a night even in an icy blizzard! I always tip in restaurants too if the service has been good, and I've rarely had bad service. It isn't about boosting wages, (it's been illegal for restaurants and hotels to use tips to make up wages since Oct 2008), but about an extra little thank you for taking extra trouble in poor working conditions. I understand if some people genuinely feel that they don't have the money to give a Christmas Box, but a card with a nice message and a few sweets in it is just as good. If it makes someone feel valued, then why not? After all, bankers get bonuses from our money and we can't even say that they give good service! jazzactivist

8:57am Thu 19 Dec 13

nixon1 says...

Christmas Boxes should not be given to everyone nor should it be expected. It should be given to those who have gone above and beyond the standard requirments of their job description to assist the customer as much as possible. Milkmen who bring in the milk into an eaderly persons house and pop it in the fridge, Postmen who will return to your house at the end of a shift to deliver a package that would otherwise be left out in the rain, Even right down to the young delivery boy who will knock on an elderly persons door to ensure they are ok every morning.
Christmas Boxes should not be given to everyone nor should it be expected. It should be given to those who have gone above and beyond the standard requirments of their job description to assist the customer as much as possible. Milkmen who bring in the milk into an eaderly persons house and pop it in the fridge, Postmen who will return to your house at the end of a shift to deliver a package that would otherwise be left out in the rain, Even right down to the young delivery boy who will knock on an elderly persons door to ensure they are ok every morning. nixon1

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