Kendal drivers urged to switch to bicycles

A COUNCIL project aimed at getting Kendal motorists to switch to bikes for short journeys around town has won Government funding.

South Lakeland District Council has been granted £29,000 to fund a range of measures to promote cycling and improve air quality in Kendal.

A recent transport study carried out by Cumbria County Council found that around 75 per cent of car journeys in and around Kendal started in the town.

The cycling project, being run in partnership with the county council, will target these short journeys, help-ing make it easier for people to switch to their bike.

Phil Greenup, SLDC’s Public Protection Manager, said: “We are delighted that officers have been successful in winning government funding to help improve air quality in the Kendal area.

“We now have £29,000 to encourage cycling around Kendal and we’re aiming to increase the number of bicycle journeys in Kendal by 10 per cent.

“This will give a reduction in locally generated car journeys and ease congestion in Kendal, reducing nitrogen dioxide emissions in the town centre.”

The grant will help us to address people’s concerns and fears about cycling in Kendal, which up until now has been a real barrier in changing travel habits.

“The grant money will be used to run events to promote cycling and cycle safety, boost confidence and also improve cycle parking facilities.”

The project is part of the ‘Go Easy’ campaign, which believes that everybody can make a positive difference to Kendal’s environment by making small but simple changes to their travel routines to reduce nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels and reduce the impact of traffic on Kendal’s fresh air.

The ‘Go Easy’ campaign has been recognised nationally in Defra’s Good Practice guidance.

SLDC Environmental Protection Officer Rachel Shaw spoke about SLDC’s ‘Go Easy’ campaign at the Investigation of Air Pollution Standing Conference in Birmingham (IAPSC).

On giving her presentation to the delegates, she said: “I told other authorities about our experiences of running a behavioural change campaign, in particular the lessons we have learnt.

“I spoke of our experiences of using the Defra funding to try to encourage drivers in Kendal to switch one journey in ten away from their car.

“The feedback was certainly very positive.”

Comments (19)

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9:31pm Mon 30 Dec 13

boris plasticmac says...

Lets start with a joined up cycle route through the town, taking away all those "cyclists dismount" signs which confuse everybody. At the same time get rid of Beast Banks, Gillingate and any other road that goes uphill, might just attract a few more people back on to their bikes.
Perhaps "Go Easy" organisers cut also throw their weight against the recently proposed cuts in bus routes or else we will be finding A&E awash with pensioner cyclists seeking coronary care.
Lets start with a joined up cycle route through the town, taking away all those "cyclists dismount" signs which confuse everybody. At the same time get rid of Beast Banks, Gillingate and any other road that goes uphill, might just attract a few more people back on to their bikes. Perhaps "Go Easy" organisers cut also throw their weight against the recently proposed cuts in bus routes or else we will be finding A&E awash with pensioner cyclists seeking coronary care. boris plasticmac

1:25am Tue 31 Dec 13

Lakeuk says...

Improving air quality is a red herring, if that was a serious goal then re-sighting of Kendal's crossings would be undertaken to reduce the effort drivers need to make when pulling away.

Reality is the grant will cover a marketing budget to which most who already cycle will be re-informed on what they already know/do.

When the schools are on holiday the amount of traffic drastically reduces but how are you going to pursued mum/dad to let their kid cycle to work and kids today are more activity focused meaning mum/dad needing to do all the ferrying.

One avenue maybe to promote to local businesses the merits of setting up a salary sacrifice scheme to allow their employees to buy a bike and save having to pay tax at the same time, for example buying a £500 bike would save you £160 in tax so that bike effectively costs you £340.
Improving air quality is a red herring, if that was a serious goal then re-sighting of Kendal's crossings would be undertaken to reduce the effort drivers need to make when pulling away. Reality is the grant will cover a marketing budget to which most who already cycle will be re-informed on what they already know/do. When the schools are on holiday the amount of traffic drastically reduces but how are you going to pursued mum/dad to let their kid cycle to work and kids today are more activity focused meaning mum/dad needing to do all the ferrying. One avenue maybe to promote to local businesses the merits of setting up a salary sacrifice scheme to allow their employees to buy a bike and save having to pay tax at the same time, for example buying a £500 bike would save you £160 in tax so that bike effectively costs you £340. Lakeuk

11:50am Tue 31 Dec 13

SqueakyWheel says...

“The grant money will be used to run events to promote cycling and cycle safety, boost confidence and also improve cycle parking facilities.”

Who wants to bet the bulk of the 29 grand goes on "promotion" and very little goes on improved cycling parking or anything tangible? For a lot of journeys by bike, Kendal is problematic. For example, if you want to head South your choice is largely Aynam Road or the cycle path. The cycle path is fine but if you want to get to anywhere other than the Leisure Centre or Natland, you have to brave one of the main Kendal approaches packed with parked cars, narrow lanes and hidden junctions.

Kendal's not unusual here. Most old market towns have narrow and congested approaches to them. However, throw in the one-way system and it adds to the problem as route choice becomes limited. Not impossible (and I do it a lot) but not exactly beginner cyclist territory.

I'd love to hear from Phil Greenup exactly which profiled journeys he thinks would constitute 10% of the routes that could convert to cycling as a method of transport?

It'd be interesting to see how many involve Highgate, Lowther Street(!), Burneside Road, Windermere Road or Aynam Road.

I'd *love* Kendal to be more cycling friendly. But 29 grand on a PR stunt isn't going to fix the problem and has the serious downside of letting SLDC tick a box that says they "did something".
“The grant money will be used to run events to promote cycling and cycle safety, boost confidence and also improve cycle parking facilities.” Who wants to bet the bulk of the 29 grand goes on "promotion" and very little goes on improved cycling parking or anything tangible? For a lot of journeys by bike, Kendal is problematic. For example, if you want to head South your choice is largely Aynam Road or the cycle path. The cycle path is fine but if you want to get to anywhere other than the Leisure Centre or Natland, you have to brave one of the main Kendal approaches packed with parked cars, narrow lanes and hidden junctions. Kendal's not unusual here. Most old market towns have narrow and congested approaches to them. However, throw in the one-way system and it adds to the problem as route choice becomes limited. Not impossible (and I do it a lot) but not exactly beginner cyclist territory. I'd love to hear from Phil Greenup exactly which profiled journeys he thinks would constitute 10% of the routes that could convert to cycling as a method of transport? It'd be interesting to see how many involve Highgate, Lowther Street(!), Burneside Road, Windermere Road or Aynam Road. I'd *love* Kendal to be more cycling friendly. But 29 grand on a PR stunt isn't going to fix the problem and has the serious downside of letting SLDC tick a box that says they "did something". SqueakyWheel

12:14pm Tue 31 Dec 13

loughrigg says...

Hmmm, how to encourage cycling over a car journey? I know! Let's build a massive car park on Busher Walk!!!
How about spending the millions that's going in to the car park and increase cyclist priority over cars in the town centre and increase the number of dedicated routes or the amount of cycle lanes on the towns approach roads.
We all know the 29 grand will disappear on tea and biscuits for policy meetings, a couple of posters and an advert in the Tim Farton Gazette and if we're lucky we'll get an overpriced, over budget one off designed cycle rack near the bird cage.
Hmmm, how to encourage cycling over a car journey? I know! Let's build a massive car park on Busher Walk!!! How about spending the millions that's going in to the car park and increase cyclist priority over cars in the town centre and increase the number of dedicated routes or the amount of cycle lanes on the towns approach roads. We all know the 29 grand will disappear on tea and biscuits for policy meetings, a couple of posters and an advert in the Tim Farton Gazette and if we're lucky we'll get an overpriced, over budget one off designed cycle rack near the bird cage. loughrigg

1:30pm Tue 31 Dec 13

Ambience says...

People who want to cycle everywhere already do. People who don't want to cycle everywhere don't. No amount of money will persuade people who don't want to cycle to cycle. End of...
People who want to cycle everywhere already do. People who don't want to cycle everywhere don't. No amount of money will persuade people who don't want to cycle to cycle. End of... Ambience

4:32pm Tue 31 Dec 13

jazzactivist says...

Well, if the plan is to increase cycling over car driving then the money needs to be spent on two serious issues:

1. Designing and developing a portable, see-through cover that will protect the cyclist and bike from our notoriously bad weather as well as a car does.

2. Designing and developing a local system where all cyclists have to pass a road test, be licensed and insured, and ride a bike according to the highway code to ensure that using the roads is as safe as possible for everyone.

I reckon if SLDC can crack those two, which £29,000 plus some match funding should cover, they will convince many people to swap cars for bikes when out and about in Kendal. But my pessimistic guess is that the money will be spent on the post of a 'part-time cycling information and promotions officer' with a bit of a marketing budget. Oh well...
Well, if the plan is to increase cycling over car driving then the money needs to be spent on two serious issues: 1. Designing and developing a portable, see-through cover that will protect the cyclist and bike from our notoriously bad weather as well as a car does. 2. Designing and developing a local system where all cyclists have to pass a road test, be licensed and insured, and ride a bike according to the highway code to ensure that using the roads is as safe as possible for everyone. I reckon if SLDC can crack those two, which £29,000 plus some match funding should cover, they will convince many people to swap cars for bikes when out and about in Kendal. But my pessimistic guess is that the money will be spent on the post of a 'part-time cycling information and promotions officer' with a bit of a marketing budget. Oh well... jazzactivist

6:15pm Tue 31 Dec 13

Guanajuato says...

The biggest problem with cycling in Kendal is the attitude of the majority of motorists. Supposedly, they have to pass a test and have insurance. Unfortunately this situation doesn't stop them pulling out of side roads as a cyclist is passing, or driving down pavements if it might save them waiting a few seconds at a junction. Neither does it stop them jumping lights, or going the wrong way along highgate. It doesn't stop them using cycle lanes as extra car parking (stricklandgate) or advanced stop lines (stricklandgate/sand
es ave). They will happily drive on the wrong side of the road at cyclists if they want to go past parked cars. What about overtaking cyclists on blind bends? Of left-hooking?
Obviously, its cyclists that cause the ost danger on the roads. ;-/
Seriously, how many motorists give at least as much space as they would when overtaking a car. At a conservative estimate I'd say somewhere around 5%.
One thing that might help would be to change the stupid cycle lane layout along Stramongate bridge / new road and the left-hook inducing setup by the town hall. Another was amply demonstrated when the conservative club was scaffolded & the retirement flats being built: Kirkland/Highgate was down to one lane and traffic flowed much better because selfish idiots weren't able to try and speed down the left lane and force their way in. The left lane could be a properly segregated cycle lane. Then again, the council's record of maintaining the few cycle lanes that are more than a bit of paint is appalling.
I don't agree that licensing cyclists would make any difference (except have the opposite effect) but do agree that this will all be gumpf to tick boxes.
The biggest problem with cycling in Kendal is the attitude of the majority of motorists. Supposedly, they have to pass a test and have insurance. Unfortunately this situation doesn't stop them pulling out of side roads as a cyclist is passing, or driving down pavements if it might save them waiting a few seconds at a junction. Neither does it stop them jumping lights, or going the wrong way along highgate. It doesn't stop them using cycle lanes as extra car parking (stricklandgate) or advanced stop lines (stricklandgate/sand es ave). They will happily drive on the wrong side of the road at cyclists if they want to go past parked cars. What about overtaking cyclists on blind bends? Of left-hooking? Obviously, its cyclists that cause the ost danger on the roads. ;-/ Seriously, how many motorists give at least as much space as they would when overtaking a car. At a conservative estimate I'd say somewhere around 5%. One thing that might help would be to change the stupid cycle lane layout along Stramongate bridge / new road and the left-hook inducing setup by the town hall. Another was amply demonstrated when the conservative club was scaffolded & the retirement flats being built: Kirkland/Highgate was down to one lane and traffic flowed much better because selfish idiots weren't able to try and speed down the left lane and force their way in. The left lane could be a properly segregated cycle lane. Then again, the council's record of maintaining the few cycle lanes that are more than a bit of paint is appalling. I don't agree that licensing cyclists would make any difference (except have the opposite effect) but do agree that this will all be gumpf to tick boxes. Guanajuato

12:29pm Wed 1 Jan 14

JudyAP says...

“The grant money will be used to run events to promote cycling and cycle safety, boost confidence and also improve cycle parking facilities.”

SLDC, great that you have the money to do something. I'm interested in what events you might run - how about a Kendal car-free day? As a regular to work and shopping cyclist I can see the benefits of not driving into town, for me it is no slower, I don't have to waste time or money parking, I get a bit of exercise, I can usually carry everything I need in a rucksack (if I can't those are the times I take the car), and (perhaps suprisingly) I rarely get wet.

I've noticed more cycling in recent years; but what prevents people who already have bikes using them to go into town? Perhaps the bike is in a shed and it takes too long to get it out? Perhaps it hasn't been used for a while and is in need of a bit of a spruce up? Perhaps the ride to town is too daunting because of perceived and actual safety and accessibility issues? Perhaps you know that there isn't a bike rack where you want to go - such as Booths? Perhaps you don't want to cart a helmet around the shops with you, or walk around town in a high visibility jacket? Perhaps you don't have a high visibility jacket? Perhaps you don't have a bike lock? Perhaps it just doesn't feel right? Perhaps you keep meaning to do it and just don't get round to it?

Whatever the reason(s) there are some things that SLDC and Cumbria County Council can do to help - well located bike racks do help - but surely businesses need to get behind this? Booths could help here perhaps? I'm constantly asked at Booths checkout if I have a car park ticket (that's a benefit which actually promotes car use) - is there any way of me benefiting from Booths if I cycle? Go on Booths - let's see if there's some way you can take the lead here?

SLDC and CCC could improve cycle safety and accessibility - I agree with Guanajuauto that more space could be provided for cyclists from the south end of town by making better use of the left lane (go to Paris and see how they segregate - it works well). Going south out of town is not easy. The riverside path could be better designed - and some change to the Nether Bridge road crossing make a huge difference - and Aynam road could be segregated as cars really only need one lane.

And how about those of you with bikes, who don't currently cycle, just give it a go - then you can advise SLDC and CCC from experience for your particular neck of the woods. If we can identify all of the physical barriers it might help.

And yes, the attitude of some of Kendal's car drivers is not great compared to lots of other towns, this isn't helped by people on bikes behaving badly/ not sticking to the law. I must emphasize that I have seen a noticeable improvement in the attitude from bus drivers in the last few years - which is great.

And, finally. please can we promote cycling in schools!!
“The grant money will be used to run events to promote cycling and cycle safety, boost confidence and also improve cycle parking facilities.” SLDC, great that you have the money to do something. I'm interested in what events you might run - how about a Kendal car-free day? As a regular to work and shopping cyclist I can see the benefits of not driving into town, for me it is no slower, I don't have to waste time or money parking, I get a bit of exercise, I can usually carry everything I need in a rucksack (if I can't those are the times I take the car), and (perhaps suprisingly) I rarely get wet. I've noticed more cycling in recent years; but what prevents people who already have bikes using them to go into town? Perhaps the bike is in a shed and it takes too long to get it out? Perhaps it hasn't been used for a while and is in need of a bit of a spruce up? Perhaps the ride to town is too daunting because of perceived and actual safety and accessibility issues? Perhaps you know that there isn't a bike rack where you want to go - such as Booths? Perhaps you don't want to cart a helmet around the shops with you, or walk around town in a high visibility jacket? Perhaps you don't have a high visibility jacket? Perhaps you don't have a bike lock? Perhaps it just doesn't feel right? Perhaps you keep meaning to do it and just don't get round to it? Whatever the reason(s) there are some things that SLDC and Cumbria County Council can do to help - well located bike racks do help - but surely businesses need to get behind this? Booths could help here perhaps? I'm constantly asked at Booths checkout if I have a car park ticket (that's a benefit which actually promotes car use) - is there any way of me benefiting from Booths if I cycle? Go on Booths - let's see if there's some way you can take the lead here? SLDC and CCC could improve cycle safety and accessibility - I agree with Guanajuauto that more space could be provided for cyclists from the south end of town by making better use of the left lane (go to Paris and see how they segregate - it works well). Going south out of town is not easy. The riverside path could be better designed - and some change to the Nether Bridge road crossing make a huge difference - and Aynam road could be segregated as cars really only need one lane. And how about those of you with bikes, who don't currently cycle, just give it a go - then you can advise SLDC and CCC from experience for your particular neck of the woods. If we can identify all of the physical barriers it might help. And yes, the attitude of some of Kendal's car drivers is not great compared to lots of other towns, this isn't helped by people on bikes behaving badly/ not sticking to the law. I must emphasize that I have seen a noticeable improvement in the attitude from bus drivers in the last few years - which is great. And, finally. please can we promote cycling in schools!! JudyAP

1:13pm Wed 1 Jan 14

zaney5 says...

Yeah, cos thats what we need. More cyclists on the roads.
Yeah, cos thats what we need. More cyclists on the roads. zaney5

5:53pm Wed 1 Jan 14

jazzactivist says...

I have a bike but I'm too scared to give it a go, JudyAP. Not so much because of problematic car drivers, but mainly because of unpleasant encounters I've had with cyclists as a pedestrian. I've been knocked over twice by cyclists, and my dog seriously injured, and both times the cyclists just yelled abuse at me and rode on. I've also seen them in Kendal riding along without looking anywhere else but straight ahead, headphones in, goggles on, zipping along pavements, through red lights and shouting at anyone and anything in their way. I don't fancy cycling along with people like that. I appreciate that there is a big difference between genuine cyclists and cycle louts, but it seems to me that the louts are the most frequent cyclists. I would really like there to be a way for people to be able to identify errant cyclists and report them for their misdemeanors, and be able to claim on their insurance for any injuries - the same as we can do with other vehicle drivers. If there is a culture change where cycling is promoted as a pleasant, leisurely activity instead of an extreme sport, and is subject to the same rules as car drivers, then I would be very happy to give it a go.
I have a bike but I'm too scared to give it a go, JudyAP. Not so much because of problematic car drivers, but mainly because of unpleasant encounters I've had with cyclists as a pedestrian. I've been knocked over twice by cyclists, and my dog seriously injured, and both times the cyclists just yelled abuse at me and rode on. I've also seen them in Kendal riding along without looking anywhere else but straight ahead, headphones in, goggles on, zipping along pavements, through red lights and shouting at anyone and anything in their way. I don't fancy cycling along with people like that. I appreciate that there is a big difference between genuine cyclists and cycle louts, but it seems to me that the louts are the most frequent cyclists. I would really like there to be a way for people to be able to identify errant cyclists and report them for their misdemeanors, and be able to claim on their insurance for any injuries - the same as we can do with other vehicle drivers. If there is a culture change where cycling is promoted as a pleasant, leisurely activity instead of an extreme sport, and is subject to the same rules as car drivers, then I would be very happy to give it a go. jazzactivist

8:59am Thu 2 Jan 14

nickjohn says...

The majority of people who have bikes but don't use them to go into down don't use them because they can't be bothered. When I had a bike I fell into that category (had it nicked and got caught in a loophole from the ins company as I could not prove it was locked at the time).

As already said you can run a promotion to show the benefits / ease of bikes but they will be hard pushed to convert people. The people who attend will be those who already bike around town.

We all have horror stories of car drivers and bikers but if you really do want to get people on bikes and out of cars then you have to stop / reduce car access into town and make it bike only and, lets be fair, this will never happen.

Alternatively start at the beginning use the money to promote biking around the schools, get people to buy into bikes long before they start to drive, get local employers to make better bike storage areas, with clothes drying facilities for when its wet, form better bike lanes in town which give access for bikes only and not cars. Form edge of town car parking which is free but has overnight bike storage facilities, get those who have to drive into town to park and then "bike" ride to work. Stop it raining so people don't get soaked through to the skin on their way to work........
The majority of people who have bikes but don't use them to go into down don't use them because they can't be bothered. When I had a bike I fell into that category (had it nicked and got caught in a loophole from the ins company as I could not prove it was locked at the time). As already said you can run a promotion to show the benefits / ease of bikes but they will be hard pushed to convert people. The people who attend will be those who already bike around town. We all have horror stories of car drivers and bikers but if you really do want to get people on bikes and out of cars then you have to stop / reduce car access into town and make it bike only and, lets be fair, this will never happen. Alternatively start at the beginning use the money to promote biking around the schools, get people to buy into bikes long before they start to drive, get local employers to make better bike storage areas, with clothes drying facilities for when its wet, form better bike lanes in town which give access for bikes only and not cars. Form edge of town car parking which is free but has overnight bike storage facilities, get those who have to drive into town to park and then "bike" ride to work. Stop it raining so people don't get soaked through to the skin on their way to work........ nickjohn

9:32am Thu 2 Jan 14

Spotty Fish says...

If my memory serves me correctly, when I was a kid growing up, we rode a bike because we weren't old enough to ride a moped or 50cc motorbike. We then rode the mopeds and motorbikes because we weren't old enough to drive a car. The car represented freedom to us and I imagine that is the way it is seen to most teenagers nowadays. If you'd given me a free bike I might have ridden occasionally, but only when the sun was shining.
Stop living in a fantasy world people. Our lives are now based around cars and will be until the fossil fuel runs out.
If my memory serves me correctly, when I was a kid growing up, we rode a bike because we weren't old enough to ride a moped or 50cc motorbike. We then rode the mopeds and motorbikes because we weren't old enough to drive a car. The car represented freedom to us and I imagine that is the way it is seen to most teenagers nowadays. If you'd given me a free bike I might have ridden occasionally, but only when the sun was shining. Stop living in a fantasy world people. Our lives are now based around cars and will be until the fossil fuel runs out. Spotty Fish

1:21pm Thu 2 Jan 14

nickjohn says...

Spotty Fish wrote:
If my memory serves me correctly, when I was a kid growing up, we rode a bike because we weren't old enough to ride a moped or 50cc motorbike. We then rode the mopeds and motorbikes because we weren't old enough to drive a car. The car represented freedom to us and I imagine that is the way it is seen to most teenagers nowadays. If you'd given me a free bike I might have ridden occasionally, but only when the sun was shining.
Stop living in a fantasy world people. Our lives are now based around cars and will be until the fossil fuel runs out.
I agree with the sentiment, my youth was no different, however, in my day there was no where near the financial costs to motoring when starting out.
Whilst cars can still be bought relatively cheaply the insurance cost for a 17 year old who has just past there test is getting on for £2,000, then there are the ongoing running costs which are far higher.

Couple all of this with a long recession and now is the optimum time to try and change peoples long term perception of the bike / walking.

I am by no means a tree hugger and have had more than my fair share of gas guzzlers but we all need to wake up and accept the reality that the finite resources we have are getting smaller every year, Americas peak production of oil was in the 70's and has dropped rapidly every year since, by 2100 there will be no oil.
[quote][p][bold]Spotty Fish[/bold] wrote: If my memory serves me correctly, when I was a kid growing up, we rode a bike because we weren't old enough to ride a moped or 50cc motorbike. We then rode the mopeds and motorbikes because we weren't old enough to drive a car. The car represented freedom to us and I imagine that is the way it is seen to most teenagers nowadays. If you'd given me a free bike I might have ridden occasionally, but only when the sun was shining. Stop living in a fantasy world people. Our lives are now based around cars and will be until the fossil fuel runs out.[/p][/quote]I agree with the sentiment, my youth was no different, however, in my day there was no where near the financial costs to motoring when starting out. Whilst cars can still be bought relatively cheaply the insurance cost for a 17 year old who has just past there test is getting on for £2,000, then there are the ongoing running costs which are far higher. Couple all of this with a long recession and now is the optimum time to try and change peoples long term perception of the bike / walking. I am by no means a tree hugger and have had more than my fair share of gas guzzlers but we all need to wake up and accept the reality that the finite resources we have are getting smaller every year, Americas peak production of oil was in the 70's and has dropped rapidly every year since, by 2100 there will be no oil. nickjohn

2:27pm Thu 2 Jan 14

Spotty Fish says...

I agree with you too nickjohn. The oil is running out. We have electrically powered cars which are a step backwards due to the range problems. We need an alternative that can allow us to travel around just as we do now, but without the pollution. To some, that answer may be the bike, but to the majority of people it's just not the answer. The lack of weather protection and ending up at your destination all hot and sweaty and dressed in the wrong clothing just doesn't cut it for most of us.
I don't know what the answer is, but chucking 29k at promoting cycling certainly isn't.
I agree with you too nickjohn. The oil is running out. We have electrically powered cars which are a step backwards due to the range problems. We need an alternative that can allow us to travel around just as we do now, but without the pollution. To some, that answer may be the bike, but to the majority of people it's just not the answer. The lack of weather protection and ending up at your destination all hot and sweaty and dressed in the wrong clothing just doesn't cut it for most of us. I don't know what the answer is, but chucking 29k at promoting cycling certainly isn't. Spotty Fish

8:21pm Thu 2 Jan 14

Grumpyoldbiker says...

Kendal is not in The Netherlands, there are too many hills. They could install those moving walkways into the road surface so that cyclists could negotiate the inclines I suppose.

They could also remind bicycle riders to wear something bright at night, use lights, cycle the right way up a one way street, not to ride on the pavements and stop at red traffic lights .

Yes I do ride a bicycle as well as a motorcycle.
Kendal is not in The Netherlands, there are too many hills. They could install those moving walkways into the road surface so that cyclists could negotiate the inclines I suppose. They could also remind bicycle riders to wear something bright at night, use lights, cycle the right way up a one way street, not to ride on the pavements and stop at red traffic lights . Yes I do ride a bicycle as well as a motorcycle. Grumpyoldbiker

7:13am Fri 3 Jan 14

JimTraficantforPresident says...

nickjohn wrote:
Spotty Fish wrote:
If my memory serves me correctly, when I was a kid growing up, we rode a bike because we weren't old enough to ride a moped or 50cc motorbike. We then rode the mopeds and motorbikes because we weren't old enough to drive a car. The car represented freedom to us and I imagine that is the way it is seen to most teenagers nowadays. If you'd given me a free bike I might have ridden occasionally, but only when the sun was shining.
Stop living in a fantasy world people. Our lives are now based around cars and will be until the fossil fuel runs out.
I agree with the sentiment, my youth was no different, however, in my day there was no where near the financial costs to motoring when starting out.
Whilst cars can still be bought relatively cheaply the insurance cost for a 17 year old who has just past there test is getting on for £2,000, then there are the ongoing running costs which are far higher.

Couple all of this with a long recession and now is the optimum time to try and change peoples long term perception of the bike / walking.

I am by no means a tree hugger and have had more than my fair share of gas guzzlers but we all need to wake up and accept the reality that the finite resources we have are getting smaller every year, Americas peak production of oil was in the 70's and has dropped rapidly every year since, by 2100 there will be no oil.
"Americas peak production of oil was in the 70's and has dropped rapidly every year since"

You really do not know what you are talking about. Fracking has been in the news lately and I would have thought this would have given you a rudimentary knowledge of it's effect on American oil production. Current US Peak production was 9.637 million barrels per day in 1970. Since 2008 production has risen from 5.0 mbpd to 8.0 mbpd in november 2013 and is expected to reach to 11.6 mbpd by 2020, easily surpassing the previous peak production and allowing the USA to become self sufficient in oil.
[quote][p][bold]nickjohn[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Spotty Fish[/bold] wrote: If my memory serves me correctly, when I was a kid growing up, we rode a bike because we weren't old enough to ride a moped or 50cc motorbike. We then rode the mopeds and motorbikes because we weren't old enough to drive a car. The car represented freedom to us and I imagine that is the way it is seen to most teenagers nowadays. If you'd given me a free bike I might have ridden occasionally, but only when the sun was shining. Stop living in a fantasy world people. Our lives are now based around cars and will be until the fossil fuel runs out.[/p][/quote]I agree with the sentiment, my youth was no different, however, in my day there was no where near the financial costs to motoring when starting out. Whilst cars can still be bought relatively cheaply the insurance cost for a 17 year old who has just past there test is getting on for £2,000, then there are the ongoing running costs which are far higher. Couple all of this with a long recession and now is the optimum time to try and change peoples long term perception of the bike / walking. I am by no means a tree hugger and have had more than my fair share of gas guzzlers but we all need to wake up and accept the reality that the finite resources we have are getting smaller every year, Americas peak production of oil was in the 70's and has dropped rapidly every year since, by 2100 there will be no oil.[/p][/quote]"Americas peak production of oil was in the 70's and has dropped rapidly every year since" You really do not know what you are talking about. Fracking has been in the news lately and I would have thought this would have given you a rudimentary knowledge of it's effect on American oil production. Current US Peak production was 9.637 million barrels per day in 1970. Since 2008 production has risen from 5.0 mbpd to 8.0 mbpd in november 2013 and is expected to reach to 11.6 mbpd by 2020, easily surpassing the previous peak production and allowing the USA to become self sufficient in oil. JimTraficantforPresident

8:03am Fri 3 Jan 14

nickjohn says...

Depends which data you analysis I was just going off basic us oil field production not factoring in any off shore deep wells etc this gives lower figures than you quote but I stand corrected if this data is not fully up to date. Not sure where cracking fits into things I thought this produced shale gas not crude oil?
Depends which data you analysis I was just going off basic us oil field production not factoring in any off shore deep wells etc this gives lower figures than you quote but I stand corrected if this data is not fully up to date. Not sure where cracking fits into things I thought this produced shale gas not crude oil? nickjohn

11:49am Wed 8 Jan 14

Guanajuato says...

Grumpyoldbiker wrote:
Kendal is not in The Netherlands, there are too many hills. They could install those moving walkways into the road surface so that cyclists could negotiate the inclines I suppose.

They could also remind bicycle riders to wear something bright at night, use lights, cycle the right way up a one way street, not to ride on the pavements and stop at red traffic lights .

Yes I do ride a bicycle as well as a motorcycle.
However much hi vis & lighting, the fact is most motorists STILL would claim not to see you. I've had it - two front lights attached to the bike, head lamp, rear red on helmet & bike, hi-vis jacket & reflectives. Still told 'Sorry Mate, I didn't see you'. :-/ They'll even make eye contact before pulling out on you.

Some cyclists do flout the law, but generally put themselves at most risk. Motorists flouting the law put others at significant risk. Which is why the emphasis on safety should be on drivers - they're the ones doing the killing & maiming. Driving should be seen as a previledge, not a right.

Whilst we're at it, can we get those stupid extending dog leads banned? I've lost count of the number of times I've had to negotiate a foot-high mobile trip wire across the riverside path in the dark (on foot). Maybe dog owners should be licensed and have to pass some kind of test before being let out in public. (There may be a hint of sarcasm is this paragraph, just in case anyone was wondering) ;-)
[quote][p][bold]Grumpyoldbiker[/bold] wrote: Kendal is not in The Netherlands, there are too many hills. They could install those moving walkways into the road surface so that cyclists could negotiate the inclines I suppose. They could also remind bicycle riders to wear something bright at night, use lights, cycle the right way up a one way street, not to ride on the pavements and stop at red traffic lights . Yes I do ride a bicycle as well as a motorcycle.[/p][/quote]However much hi vis & lighting, the fact is most motorists STILL would claim not to see you. I've had it - two front lights attached to the bike, head lamp, rear red on helmet & bike, hi-vis jacket & reflectives. Still told 'Sorry Mate, I didn't see you'. :-/ They'll even make eye contact before pulling out on you. Some cyclists do flout the law, but generally put themselves at most risk. Motorists flouting the law put others at significant risk. Which is why the emphasis on safety should be on drivers - they're the ones doing the killing & maiming. Driving should be seen as a previledge, not a right. Whilst we're at it, can we get those stupid extending dog leads banned? I've lost count of the number of times I've had to negotiate a foot-high mobile trip wire across the riverside path in the dark (on foot). Maybe dog owners should be licensed and have to pass some kind of test before being let out in public. (There may be a hint of sarcasm is this paragraph, just in case anyone was wondering) ;-) Guanajuato

8:16pm Wed 8 Jan 14

nickjohn says...

"Driving should be seen as a previledge (sic), not a right."

I believe it already is Guanajuato. Before you can drive a car you must be 17, possess a driving licence, which can only be obtained after you have past a test, have a vehicle which is road legal and have insurance.

Whereas you can drive a bike on the public highway at any age, with no training, with no licence and with no insurance.

IMO the emphasis should be on more cyclist training and a requirement to carry insurance than chastising motorists.
I for one have been hit by a cyclist (sat in traffic when a cyclist came across a junction in front of a car, swerved to miss that car and damaged mine. When I asked about who was going to pay for my repairs he said "I have no money claim on your insurance" then cycled off - with TPFT you can make no claim!!!!!)
"Driving should be seen as a previledge (sic), not a right." I believe it already is Guanajuato. Before you can drive a car you must be 17, possess a driving licence, which can only be obtained after you have past a test, have a vehicle which is road legal and have insurance. Whereas you can drive a bike on the public highway at any age, with no training, with no licence and with no insurance. IMO the emphasis should be on more cyclist training and a requirement to carry insurance than chastising motorists. I for one have been hit by a cyclist (sat in traffic when a cyclist came across a junction in front of a car, swerved to miss that car and damaged mine. When I asked about who was going to pay for my repairs he said "I have no money claim on your insurance" then cycled off - with TPFT you can make no claim!!!!!) nickjohn

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