Charity shop seeks stock and volunteers

Manager Karla Earp and assistant manager Carole Morris

Manager Karla Earp and assistant manager Carole Morris

First published in News
Last updated
The Westmorland Gazette: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

BRAND new stock and a team of local volunteers are needed by a Kendal charity shop.

Staff at the British Heart Foundation, at Highgate, are calling for generous locals to give up either a regular slot to work in the shop or half an hour to have a clear-out at home.

“We’re always desperate for stock and for volunteers and between Christmas and New Year there’s always a lull,” explained the store’s assistant manager, Carole Morris.

“Over Christmas people will have been given new things so now is a great time to donate unwanted items.

“The New Year is also a great time to start something new, like giving up time for a charity.”

Now the cold weather has set in the store is in need of warm clothing like coats, scarves, jumpers and boots.

All the profits made by the shop fund ‘the fight against heart disease’.

Ann Lomas, area manager for BHF, added: “We absolutely rely on the support of the local community to keep us running and without their vital donations we cannot meet the demand for good quality winter clothing.”

The shop offers a free collection service so anybody who cannot bring items into the shop is asked to contact 01539-728660.

A coffee morning will be held at Kendal Town Hall on February 14 between 9.30am and 12.30pm, when staff hope to meet potential new colleagues.

Comments (3)

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10:35am Sun 19 Jan 14

Milkbutnosugarplease says...

I hope they charge sensible prices which local people can afford. I won't donate things or buy things from charity shops that price a paperback book at £2.50. £1.00 or even 50p is affordable. 'Charity' refers to the good cause but also to the people who shop there - it's a balance of benefits rather than maximum prices in the shop.
I hope they charge sensible prices which local people can afford. I won't donate things or buy things from charity shops that price a paperback book at £2.50. £1.00 or even 50p is affordable. 'Charity' refers to the good cause but also to the people who shop there - it's a balance of benefits rather than maximum prices in the shop. Milkbutnosugarplease
  • Score: 3

12:29pm Sun 19 Jan 14

oceancloud says...

Surely the aim of a charity shop is to make as much as it can for the charity. If they price things too high then people will not buy. Most of them are manned by volunteers who I am sure don't want to give things away at ridiculously low prices.
Surely the aim of a charity shop is to make as much as it can for the charity. If they price things too high then people will not buy. Most of them are manned by volunteers who I am sure don't want to give things away at ridiculously low prices. oceancloud
  • Score: 0

7:06pm Tue 21 Jan 14

Lakeuk says...

Charity shops are businesses and in that sense they're not a charity so as with any business it's up to them to charge what ever the market will take. They're in a better position than normal business with having alot lower costs, usually lower business rates, rents and volunteers so no wages, income tax, national insurance unless you're one of the bigger charities that employs a store manager to manager their volunteers to have them sell more.

The number of charity shops we have in most high streets compared to 10yrs ago suggests charities are falling over themselves to get abit of everyone's goodwill. I wonder if this story requesting help is just highlighting that demand is now way greater than the available supply
Charity shops are businesses and in that sense they're not a charity so as with any business it's up to them to charge what ever the market will take. They're in a better position than normal business with having alot lower costs, usually lower business rates, rents and volunteers so no wages, income tax, national insurance unless you're one of the bigger charities that employs a store manager to manager their volunteers to have them sell more. The number of charity shops we have in most high streets compared to 10yrs ago suggests charities are falling over themselves to get abit of everyone's goodwill. I wonder if this story requesting help is just highlighting that demand is now way greater than the available supply Lakeuk
  • Score: 4

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