Call for action over 'dangerous' stretch of road

The Westmorland Gazette: Tim Farron Tim Farron

A PETITION has been set up calling for action to be taken over a ‘dangerous’ stretch of South Lakeland road.

Almost 100 people have already signed the online document, which is calling for part of the A684, close to Sedbergh, to be resurfaced ‘before a fatality happens’.

“This stretch of road, despite a 20 mile an hour speed limit being imposed, is still experiencing at least one crash a week,” says the website, set up by Sara Last, who manages Sedbergh’s Farfield Mill.

“Cumbria County Council has told Westmorland and Lonsdale MP Tim Farron that the road is due to be resurfaced this coming summer... this is too long to wait!”

It added: “So far no accidents on this stretch of road have led to any fatalities, let us get this sorted before one happens.”

Last year the Gazette reported how the stretch of road, close to Lily Mere near Killington, had been the scene of 11 collisions in just three months.

Josephine Lade, of Orton, revealed that her car was written off after she lost control at less than 40mph on a right hand bend ‘as if on ice’.

Her car crashed into a wall and she was ‘catapulted’ back into the highway, where the car spun a further 180 degrees before coming to rest.

“One of the people who stopped to help me told me how their car had skidded immediately before they stopped for me,” she said.

A Cumbria County Council spokesman later said ‘Slippery Road’ signs had been installed, while an advisory 20mph speed limit was introduced, with speed indicator devices.

But residents now say the road needs to be completely resurfaced.

“It needs to be done now for safety reasons,” said Alan Tattersall, who signed the petition.

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And putting her name to the document, Clare Rice said: “I see accidents regularly on this stretch – and don't feel safe myself, even though I drive slowly and carefully on this road. “The surface is clearly dangerous!”

Mr Farron is now urging more local people to sign the form.

“The more people that add their voice and their signature to the campaign the stronger our campaign is,” he said.

“We are working hard to try to force the council to do the urgent work required to fix the road before we see another accident.”

To sign the petition visit www.ipetitions. com/petition/A684

Comments (25)

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12:51am Wed 12 Feb 14

Nightblogger says...

Is there any real evidence that the road surface itself is at fault? It is a difficult stretch of road and needs to be driven with caution.
Is there any real evidence that the road surface itself is at fault? It is a difficult stretch of road and needs to be driven with caution. Nightblogger
  • Score: 2

7:05am Wed 12 Feb 14

hogheaven says...

I think it has been established that their is a problem with the road surface,that is why the 20mph limit was introduced.So why wait for a fatality
to occur before something is done, DO IT NOW.
I think it has been established that their is a problem with the road surface,that is why the 20mph limit was introduced.So why wait for a fatality to occur before something is done, DO IT NOW. hogheaven
  • Score: 2

11:12am Wed 12 Feb 14

loughrigg says...

I very much doubt the council has used different Tarmac on this stretch if road to all the other roads in Cumbria.
11 collisions, what about the thousands and thousands of other road users on the same road, in the same conditions that haven't crashed!
There's nothing wrong with the road, the surface or signs. I use it regularly and faster than most people are claiming they were doing when they crashed.
Stop trying to pass the blame on to something/somebody else and just admit driver error. I would guess, too fast / didn't read the corner properly / overreacted when you realised.
Has Tim Farron made enquiries with the police as to how many if these crashes they attended and how many of the drivers have been prosecuted?
Stop blaming the roads/rain/ice/wind (anything but your own driving standard). It will have been raining/icy/windy when you set off, drive accordingly.
Dear Council/Highways, I'd like to start a petition to prevent this stretch if road being resurfaced (until it wears out). Please don't waste my tax money on something that doesn't need doing. I guarantee that if the road is resurfaced, the muppets will continue to crash.
I very much doubt the council has used different Tarmac on this stretch if road to all the other roads in Cumbria. 11 collisions, what about the thousands and thousands of other road users on the same road, in the same conditions that haven't crashed! There's nothing wrong with the road, the surface or signs. I use it regularly and faster than most people are claiming they were doing when they crashed. Stop trying to pass the blame on to something/somebody else and just admit driver error. I would guess, too fast / didn't read the corner properly / overreacted when you realised. Has Tim Farron made enquiries with the police as to how many if these crashes they attended and how many of the drivers have been prosecuted? Stop blaming the roads/rain/ice/wind (anything but your own driving standard). It will have been raining/icy/windy when you set off, drive accordingly. Dear Council/Highways, I'd like to start a petition to prevent this stretch if road being resurfaced (until it wears out). Please don't waste my tax money on something that doesn't need doing. I guarantee that if the road is resurfaced, the muppets will continue to crash. loughrigg
  • Score: 13

11:49am Wed 12 Feb 14

hogheaven says...

From distant memory ,I think the council and the police agreed there was something wrong with the road surface.I agree some people will always crash even on straight roads. But their is a problem here, perhaps a comment from the police or council would be appropriate.
From distant memory ,I think the council and the police agreed there was something wrong with the road surface.I agree some people will always crash even on straight roads. But their is a problem here, perhaps a comment from the police or council would be appropriate. hogheaven
  • Score: 2

11:51am Wed 12 Feb 14

Sally McMullen says...

Clearly there IS a problem with this stretch of road, and all others with similarly cambered bends that suffer frequently poor weather conditions. When the road is wet, it is extremely slippery and is EXACTLY like an ice rink. It is certainly very difficult to maintain control of a non 4x4 on this surface.

p.s. The idiotic man who says he drives 'faster than' everyone else quite possibly causes, or will cause, some of the accidents!
Clearly there IS a problem with this stretch of road, and all others with similarly cambered bends that suffer frequently poor weather conditions. When the road is wet, it is extremely slippery and is EXACTLY like an ice rink. It is certainly very difficult to maintain control of a non 4x4 on this surface. p.s. The idiotic man who says he drives 'faster than' everyone else quite possibly causes, or will cause, some of the accidents! Sally McMullen
  • Score: -13

1:23pm Wed 12 Feb 14

loughrigg says...

If it's EXACTLY like a nice rink, why doesn't EVERYBODY crash then?
If it's EXACTLY like a nice rink, why doesn't EVERYBODY crash then? loughrigg
  • Score: 13

1:36pm Wed 12 Feb 14

loughrigg says...

Oh, and Sally. I didn't say I drive faster than everybody else, I said I've driven faster than some of the people who crashed claim they were driving and had no problems with the road. Why does the fact I haven't crashed or lost control of a 4x4 mean I'm idiotic? Surely the ones who can't control their 4x4's are the idiots?
I haven't caused a crash. I don't drive close to others, I drive according to the road conditions and don't overtake unless it's safe and legal to do so, which is exactly why I, along with thousands of others have never crashed or had a problem on this stretch of road.
Let's hear from the police. If the road is to blame, they won't have prosecuted anyone.
And finally, please don't assume, I'm not a man!
Oh, and Sally. I didn't say I drive faster than everybody else, I said I've driven faster than some of the people who crashed claim they were driving and had no problems with the road. Why does the fact I haven't crashed or lost control of a 4x4 mean I'm idiotic? Surely the ones who can't control their 4x4's are the idiots? I haven't caused a crash. I don't drive close to others, I drive according to the road conditions and don't overtake unless it's safe and legal to do so, which is exactly why I, along with thousands of others have never crashed or had a problem on this stretch of road. Let's hear from the police. If the road is to blame, they won't have prosecuted anyone. And finally, please don't assume, I'm not a man! loughrigg
  • Score: 11

2:17pm Wed 12 Feb 14

Nightblogger says...

One of the drivers above admitted that she was driving "at less than 40mph" when she lost control of her vehicle. That's too fast for many of the bends on that stretch of road even if the 20mph limit quite a long stretch of road is more than a bit ridiculous and widely ignored even by those who are not 'boy racers'!

No-one has given any 'evidence' that it is the road which is to blame - or that the tarmac is any different than that used elsewhere on similar roads. I remain to be convinced that it's the road, and like 'loughrigg' I think that resurfacing a perfectly adequate road surface is a waste of tax payers money.

Have any of those who have crashed and blamed the road successfully sued Cumbria County Council?
One of the drivers above admitted that she was driving "at less than 40mph" when she lost control of her vehicle. That's too fast for many of the bends on that stretch of road even if the 20mph limit quite a long stretch of road is more than a bit ridiculous and widely ignored even by those who are not 'boy racers'! No-one has given any 'evidence' that it is the road which is to blame - or that the tarmac is any different than that used elsewhere on similar roads. I remain to be convinced that it's the road, and like 'loughrigg' I think that resurfacing a perfectly adequate road surface is a waste of tax payers money. Have any of those who have crashed and blamed the road successfully sued Cumbria County Council? Nightblogger
  • Score: 10

4:24pm Wed 12 Feb 14

tictoc1 says...

No road is dangerous, it's the drivers that are dangerous by not driving to the conditions.
No road is dangerous, it's the drivers that are dangerous by not driving to the conditions. tictoc1
  • Score: 13

4:31pm Wed 12 Feb 14

fellsman says...

The Liberals control the County Council - seems a bit daft to organise a petition - why can't he speak to his colleagues
The Liberals control the County Council - seems a bit daft to organise a petition - why can't he speak to his colleagues fellsman
  • Score: 4

5:16pm Wed 12 Feb 14

Grumpy oldman says...

Quite right loughrigg, There are no dangerous roads only dangerous drivers. perhaps compliance with the highway code or better still a few hours with the Institute of Advanced motorists would help.

The A684 has problems but the problems are surface break up in places causing extreme roughness particularly at the bottom of Black horse Hill at present.

Between 1960 and 1990 I recovered hundreds of crashed vehicles from the A648 and all the other roads in the area, and quite a lot were from this particular bend. It is drivers that cause crashes, not the road surface or we would all crash there.

Highway code rule 227;

Wet weather. In wet weather, stopping distances will be at least double those required for stopping on dry roads (download ‘Typical stopping distances’ from the highway code ). This is because your tyres have less grip on the road. In wet weather
you should keep well back from the vehicle in front. This will increase your ability to see and plan ahead
if the steering becomes unresponsive, it probably means that water is preventing the tyres from gripping the road. Ease off the accelerator and slow down gradually the rain and spray from vehicles may make it difficult to see and be seen. take extra care around pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders.
Quite right loughrigg, There are no dangerous roads only dangerous drivers. perhaps compliance with the highway code or better still a few hours with the Institute of Advanced motorists would help. The A684 has problems but the problems are surface break up in places causing extreme roughness particularly at the bottom of Black horse Hill at present. Between 1960 and 1990 I recovered hundreds of crashed vehicles from the A648 and all the other roads in the area, and quite a lot were from this particular bend. It is drivers that cause crashes, not the road surface or we would all crash there. Highway code rule 227; Wet weather. In wet weather, stopping distances will be at least double those required for stopping on dry roads (download ‘Typical stopping distances’ from the highway code ). This is because your tyres have less grip on the road. In wet weather you should keep well back from the vehicle in front. This will increase your ability to see and plan ahead if the steering becomes unresponsive, it probably means that water is preventing the tyres from gripping the road. Ease off the accelerator and slow down gradually the rain and spray from vehicles may make it difficult to see and be seen. take extra care around pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders. Grumpy oldman
  • Score: 12

5:47pm Wed 12 Feb 14

hogheaven says...

Grumpy oldman wrote:
Quite right loughrigg, There are no dangerous roads only dangerous drivers. perhaps compliance with the highway code or better still a few hours with the Institute of Advanced motorists would help.

The A684 has problems but the problems are surface break up in places causing extreme roughness particularly at the bottom of Black horse Hill at present.

Between 1960 and 1990 I recovered hundreds of crashed vehicles from the A648 and all the other roads in the area, and quite a lot were from this particular bend. It is drivers that cause crashes, not the road surface or we would all crash there.

Highway code rule 227;

Wet weather. In wet weather, stopping distances will be at least double those required for stopping on dry roads (download ‘Typical stopping distances’ from the highway code ). This is because your tyres have less grip on the road. In wet weather
you should keep well back from the vehicle in front. This will increase your ability to see and plan ahead
if the steering becomes unresponsive, it probably means that water is preventing the tyres from gripping the road. Ease off the accelerator and slow down gradually the rain and spray from vehicles may make it difficult to see and be seen. take extra care around pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders.
The fact that you have recovered hundreds of crashed vehicles from this area must mean something, other than bad drivers. Has the road got adverse cambers? or is it a surface issue? have any abrasion tests been done on the surface?. The fact that no one has sued the council does not prove anything ,probably more the case they cannot afford to . Lets have some views from experts in this field, not just personal opinions.
[quote][p][bold]Grumpy oldman[/bold] wrote: Quite right loughrigg, There are no dangerous roads only dangerous drivers. perhaps compliance with the highway code or better still a few hours with the Institute of Advanced motorists would help. The A684 has problems but the problems are surface break up in places causing extreme roughness particularly at the bottom of Black horse Hill at present. Between 1960 and 1990 I recovered hundreds of crashed vehicles from the A648 and all the other roads in the area, and quite a lot were from this particular bend. It is drivers that cause crashes, not the road surface or we would all crash there. Highway code rule 227; Wet weather. In wet weather, stopping distances will be at least double those required for stopping on dry roads (download ‘Typical stopping distances’ from the highway code ). This is because your tyres have less grip on the road. In wet weather you should keep well back from the vehicle in front. This will increase your ability to see and plan ahead if the steering becomes unresponsive, it probably means that water is preventing the tyres from gripping the road. Ease off the accelerator and slow down gradually the rain and spray from vehicles may make it difficult to see and be seen. take extra care around pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders.[/p][/quote]The fact that you have recovered hundreds of crashed vehicles from this area must mean something, other than bad drivers. Has the road got adverse cambers? or is it a surface issue? have any abrasion tests been done on the surface?. The fact that no one has sued the council does not prove anything ,probably more the case they cannot afford to . Lets have some views from experts in this field, not just personal opinions. hogheaven
  • Score: -7

7:33pm Wed 12 Feb 14

Nightblogger says...

Seems to me that a professional driver and recovery operator IS an EXPERT.

Crashes are evidence that the road is a dangerous and requires caution. They are not evidence that the road surface itself is to blame. I asked for evidence rather than 'opinion' of that fact and nobody can even suggest how or why the tarmac laid on the A684 is somehow different from the tarmac laid on many other bendy and hilly roads in Cumbria that don't have such a record of accidents. In the absence of any other suggestion it still seems most likely that 'driver error' is responsible,
Seems to me that a professional driver and recovery operator IS an EXPERT. Crashes are evidence that the road is a dangerous and requires caution. They are not evidence that the road surface itself is to blame. I asked for evidence rather than 'opinion' of that fact and nobody can even suggest how or why the tarmac laid on the A684 is somehow different from the tarmac laid on many other bendy and hilly roads in Cumbria that don't have such a record of accidents. In the absence of any other suggestion it still seems most likely that 'driver error' is responsible, Nightblogger
  • Score: 5

2:02pm Thu 13 Feb 14

MR P KENDAL says...

i know the road well and the surface is to blame i know a young lady who crashed her car there going no more than 20 miles an hour .so people need to get their facts right before spouting off.
i know the road well and the surface is to blame i know a young lady who crashed her car there going no more than 20 miles an hour .so people need to get their facts right before spouting off. MR P KENDAL
  • Score: -3

6:37pm Thu 13 Feb 14

Nightblogger says...

You have quoted a fact and one possible explanation of it. Now can you supply some evidence of how the road surface can be held to blame?

Happy to hear something to back up your theory rather than another spouted assertion with no evidence behind it.

Did the person in question sue the Council? That might indicate a real case.
You have quoted a fact and one possible explanation of it. Now can you supply some evidence of how the road surface can be held to blame? Happy to hear something to back up your theory rather than another spouted assertion with no evidence behind it. Did the person in question sue the Council? That might indicate a real case. Nightblogger
  • Score: 1

12:31am Fri 14 Feb 14

JimTraficantforPresident says...

Nightblogger & Loughrigg:

I was riding my motorbike through there very carefully, as I'd had trouble previously, and the back end still slid out. Just the same as hitting a patch of ice and no I wasn't leant over very far. Even when it's dry the tarmac still seems to have a certain sheen to it. I avoid that stretch of road.
Nightblogger & Loughrigg: I was riding my motorbike through there very carefully, as I'd had trouble previously, and the back end still slid out. Just the same as hitting a patch of ice and no I wasn't leant over very far. Even when it's dry the tarmac still seems to have a certain sheen to it. I avoid that stretch of road. JimTraficantforPresident
  • Score: -1

6:12am Fri 14 Feb 14

Nightblogger says...

Good. That at least is a positive contribution to the debate. I'd still want to know what is different about this particular tarmac and why, presumably it was only laid on this stretch of road in the whole of Cumbria.

My experience is that the road surface is as good as any other. In most conditions I can drive it quite safely at legal speeds and slowing appropriately for the corners - mind you I have had the sense to fit winter tyres to my 4x4. I think there was an issue in the autumn with ground leaves in wet weather, and that could easily leave an oily sheen. Not sure why that would only cause an issue on this particular road though.

Anyway, I hope the Council are not going to lay the same kind of tarmac at the bottom of Black Horse Hill when they resurface it next week or people will have an excuse for crashing there as well.
Good. That at least is a positive contribution to the debate. I'd still want to know what is different about this particular tarmac and why, presumably it was only laid on this stretch of road in the whole of Cumbria. My experience is that the road surface is as good as any other. In most conditions I can drive it quite safely at legal speeds and slowing appropriately for the corners - mind you I have had the sense to fit winter tyres to my 4x4. I think there was an issue in the autumn with ground leaves in wet weather, and that could easily leave an oily sheen. Not sure why that would only cause an issue on this particular road though. Anyway, I hope the Council are not going to lay the same kind of tarmac at the bottom of Black Horse Hill when they resurface it next week or people will have an excuse for crashing there as well. Nightblogger
  • Score: 3

7:53am Fri 14 Feb 14

MR P KENDAL says...

the young lady i know was driving a brand new landrover evoque fitted with brand new michelin winter tyres so thats your 4x4 theory out of the window. it is fact that the stretch of road in question is to blame and not the drivers in this case.
the young lady i know was driving a brand new landrover evoque fitted with brand new michelin winter tyres so thats your 4x4 theory out of the window. it is fact that the stretch of road in question is to blame and not the drivers in this case. MR P KENDAL
  • Score: -2

8:11am Fri 14 Feb 14

hogheaven says...

I wish people would stop trying to blame the drivers ,there is OBVIOUSLY something wrong with the road surface. More importantly whats going to be done about it
I wish people would stop trying to blame the drivers ,there is OBVIOUSLY something wrong with the road surface. More importantly whats going to be done about it hogheaven
  • Score: -7

10:55am Fri 14 Feb 14

Skypilot says...

If it's so OBVIOUS then someone would have sued the council by now - and there would also be crashes on the similarly tarmaced stretch of road from Firbank road down to the Lune Bridge. Even 4x4 drivers with winter tyres can misjudge the conditions, perhaps even more so if they think they are impregnable.
If it's so OBVIOUS then someone would have sued the council by now - and there would also be crashes on the similarly tarmaced stretch of road from Firbank road down to the Lune Bridge. Even 4x4 drivers with winter tyres can misjudge the conditions, perhaps even more so if they think they are impregnable. Skypilot
  • Score: 3

11:41am Fri 14 Feb 14

Spotty Fish says...

This could become the new Devil's Bridge. People could travel from far and wide to test themselves against the Devil's Road!!
This could become the new Devil's Bridge. People could travel from far and wide to test themselves against the Devil's Road!! Spotty Fish
  • Score: 0

2:16pm Fri 14 Feb 14

MR P KENDAL says...

Skypilot wrote:
If it's so OBVIOUS then someone would have sued the council by now - and there would also be crashes on the similarly tarmaced stretch of road from Firbank road down to the Lune Bridge. Even 4x4 drivers with winter tyres can misjudge the conditions, perhaps even more so if they think they are impregnable.
the accidents are year round not just winter so you cant blame people driving too quick for the time of the year. i drive a 2 wheel drive car and always take care when using the stretch of road in question and always feel uneasy when driving there.
[quote][p][bold]Skypilot[/bold] wrote: If it's so OBVIOUS then someone would have sued the council by now - and there would also be crashes on the similarly tarmaced stretch of road from Firbank road down to the Lune Bridge. Even 4x4 drivers with winter tyres can misjudge the conditions, perhaps even more so if they think they are impregnable.[/p][/quote]the accidents are year round not just winter so you cant blame people driving too quick for the time of the year. i drive a 2 wheel drive car and always take care when using the stretch of road in question and always feel uneasy when driving there. MR P KENDAL
  • Score: 0

3:09pm Fri 14 Feb 14

Skypilot says...

MR P KENDAL wrote:
Skypilot wrote:
If it's so OBVIOUS then someone would have sued the council by now - and there would also be crashes on the similarly tarmaced stretch of road from Firbank road down to the Lune Bridge. Even 4x4 drivers with winter tyres can misjudge the conditions, perhaps even more so if they think they are impregnable.
the accidents are year round not just winter so you cant blame people driving too quick for the time of the year. i drive a 2 wheel drive car and always take care when using the stretch of road in question and always feel uneasy when driving there.
You are right to drive with extra care on that stretch of road at all times of year as it is challenging. People can drive too fast for the conditions at any time of year.

None of that means that it is obvious that it is the road surface which is to blame and no-one has posted any evidence to prove that this is the case. The fact that what looks like very similar if not identical tarmac on other stretches of the road which don't have a reputation for accidents suggests that it isn't the surface causing the crashes.
[quote][p][bold]MR P KENDAL[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Skypilot[/bold] wrote: If it's so OBVIOUS then someone would have sued the council by now - and there would also be crashes on the similarly tarmaced stretch of road from Firbank road down to the Lune Bridge. Even 4x4 drivers with winter tyres can misjudge the conditions, perhaps even more so if they think they are impregnable.[/p][/quote]the accidents are year round not just winter so you cant blame people driving too quick for the time of the year. i drive a 2 wheel drive car and always take care when using the stretch of road in question and always feel uneasy when driving there.[/p][/quote]You are right to drive with extra care on that stretch of road at all times of year as it is challenging. People can drive too fast for the conditions at any time of year. None of that means that it is obvious that it is the road surface which is to blame and no-one has posted any evidence to prove that this is the case. The fact that what looks like very similar if not identical tarmac on other stretches of the road which don't have a reputation for accidents suggests that it isn't the surface causing the crashes. Skypilot
  • Score: 4

1:17pm Sun 16 Feb 14

jallison says...

Nightblogger wrote:
Good. That at least is a positive contribution to the debate. I'd still want to know what is different about this particular tarmac and why, presumably it was only laid on this stretch of road in the whole of Cumbria.

My experience is that the road surface is as good as any other. In most conditions I can drive it quite safely at legal speeds and slowing appropriately for the corners - mind you I have had the sense to fit winter tyres to my 4x4. I think there was an issue in the autumn with ground leaves in wet weather, and that could easily leave an oily sheen. Not sure why that would only cause an issue on this particular road though.

Anyway, I hope the Council are not going to lay the same kind of tarmac at the bottom of Black Horse Hill when they resurface it next week or people will have an excuse for crashing there as well.
People think if they drive a 4x4, then they're safe in all road conditions which is nonsense. As I live rural, I'm into my 5th 4x4 and always have mud & snow tyres fitted from new. 4x4's are useless on icy roads, especially on patches of black ice no matter how good a driver you are. They behave just like a sledge.
[quote][p][bold]Nightblogger[/bold] wrote: Good. That at least is a positive contribution to the debate. I'd still want to know what is different about this particular tarmac and why, presumably it was only laid on this stretch of road in the whole of Cumbria. My experience is that the road surface is as good as any other. In most conditions I can drive it quite safely at legal speeds and slowing appropriately for the corners - mind you I have had the sense to fit winter tyres to my 4x4. I think there was an issue in the autumn with ground leaves in wet weather, and that could easily leave an oily sheen. Not sure why that would only cause an issue on this particular road though. Anyway, I hope the Council are not going to lay the same kind of tarmac at the bottom of Black Horse Hill when they resurface it next week or people will have an excuse for crashing there as well.[/p][/quote]People think if they drive a 4x4, then they're safe in all road conditions which is nonsense. As I live rural, I'm into my 5th 4x4 and always have mud & snow tyres fitted from new. 4x4's are useless on icy roads, especially on patches of black ice no matter how good a driver you are. They behave just like a sledge. jallison
  • Score: 2

1:49pm Sun 16 Feb 14

Nightblogger says...

Of course even 4x4s need to be driven carefully at an appropriate speed with an eye on the road conditions and some people do think they are safer than they are - not everyone though. They are not 'useless' on ice and will maintain traction longer than an ordinary vehicle so long as they are not driven too fast. Winter tyres help all vehicle types to maintain grip and traction in snowy, icy and wet conditions - but once the traction is lost by excessive speed it doesn't matter what the vehicle or the tyres, you won't get control back until it stops sliding. As 4x4s are usually heavier that ordinary cars and have higher centres of gravity they are actually more dangerous if they do loose traction at speed and take longer to stop because of iniertia.

Some have maintained that this stretch of road surface is 'like ice'. If it was I think we'd be having multiple crashes every day, not just several times in a month.
Of course even 4x4s need to be driven carefully at an appropriate speed with an eye on the road conditions and some people do think they are safer than they are - not everyone though. They are not 'useless' on ice and will maintain traction longer than an ordinary vehicle so long as they are not driven too fast. Winter tyres help all vehicle types to maintain grip and traction in snowy, icy and wet conditions - but once the traction is lost by excessive speed it doesn't matter what the vehicle or the tyres, you won't get control back until it stops sliding. As 4x4s are usually heavier that ordinary cars and have higher centres of gravity they are actually more dangerous if they do loose traction at speed and take longer to stop because of iniertia. Some have maintained that this stretch of road surface is 'like ice'. If it was I think we'd be having multiple crashes every day, not just several times in a month. Nightblogger
  • Score: 1

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