Eric Pickles steps into Killington wind farm row

Eric Pickles

Eric Pickles

First published in News The Westmorland Gazette: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

THE government has become involved in an hotly-debated plan to build three large wind turbines close to the Yorkshire Dales National Park.

Members of South Lakeland District Council’s planning committee gave the green light to site the 132-metre high turbines on land north of Killington reservoir in January.

However, it has now emerged that the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) has intervened and has asked to see the relevant planning documents.

Headed by Eric Pickles MP, the Secretary of State for DCLG, it gives government officials time to examine whether the decision was made on a sound basis.

If Mr Pickles does decide to call the decision in then a public inquiry will be set up.

Despite the plan being recommended for refusal by officers, the committee gave the thumbs up to the plan by a seven to three majority.

Arguments put forward for approval included the financial benefits offered by developers and decreasing reliability on fossil fuels.

However, concerns were raised over the effect the turbines would have on local wildlife, scenery and the tourism trade.

There were 1,045 individual objections to the project and 1,245 letters and e-mails in support of granting consent.

A SLDC spokesperson said: “The Secretary of State now has a period of time to decide whether to call in this decision for his determination.”

But Phil Dyke, development director at Banks Renewables, remained confident the plan would go ahead.

He said: “The strong mandate given by South Lakeland District Council’s planning committee to the Killington wind farm is directly in line with the strong emphasis placed on local decision-making within the National Planning Policy Framework.

“We’re extremely grateful to the many local people who strongly supported the Killington project in the run-up to and at the planning committee meeting, and we look forward to realising the many benefits of taking it forward on the expected timetable.”

Comments (6)

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6:44pm Wed 12 Feb 14

meroepyramid says...

Excellent news. The decision by the majority of the Councillors to over rule the recommendation of the Planning Officer and approve this application was totally flawed. The significant negative impacts of this development clearly outweigh any perceived benefit of a paltry amount of renewable energy and large profits for the developer through the RO scheme - paid for through our energy bills. I am glad Tim Farron has welcomed the decision to review this but it was primarily the LibDem Councillors who voted for it thus ignoring the Planning Officer's recommendation. Hopefully the review by the SOS will result in this application being called in and refused.
We should be spending the two billion pounds per year of renewable subsidies which generate obscene profits for wind farm operators like Banks on improving flood defenses and adapting to live with the changing climate. No amount of wind turbines are going to stop the current extreme weather events.
Excellent news. The decision by the majority of the Councillors to over rule the recommendation of the Planning Officer and approve this application was totally flawed. The significant negative impacts of this development clearly outweigh any perceived benefit of a paltry amount of renewable energy and large profits for the developer through the RO scheme - paid for through our energy bills. I am glad Tim Farron has welcomed the decision to review this but it was primarily the LibDem Councillors who voted for it thus ignoring the Planning Officer's recommendation. Hopefully the review by the SOS will result in this application being called in and refused. We should be spending the two billion pounds per year of renewable subsidies which generate obscene profits for wind farm operators like Banks on improving flood defenses and adapting to live with the changing climate. No amount of wind turbines are going to stop the current extreme weather events. meroepyramid
  • Score: 9

7:11pm Wed 12 Feb 14

otters says...

It is ironic that in the very high winds that we are experiencing wind energy is only producing 3.88GW while national energy demand is 51.00GW

Three turbines are going to do diddly squat for energy production, but the developer Banks stands to make over £30 million profit over the next 25 years from very generous subsidy - All paid for on rising energy bills which many people in Cumbria are already struggling to pay

The loss of iconic landscape of international importance and the benefits tourism brings to the area, far outweighs the meagre energy production three turbines will produce.
It is ironic that in the very high winds that we are experiencing wind energy is only producing 3.88GW while national energy demand is 51.00GW Three turbines are going to do diddly squat for energy production, but the developer Banks stands to make over £30 million profit over the next 25 years from very generous subsidy - All paid for on rising energy bills which many people in Cumbria are already struggling to pay The loss of iconic landscape of international importance and the benefits tourism brings to the area, far outweighs the meagre energy production three turbines will produce. otters
  • Score: 11

8:35pm Wed 12 Feb 14

otters says...

http://www.dailymail
.co.uk/news/article-
2557568/Carp-diem-Os
prey-swoops-seize-pr
ey-lifts-stunned-loo
king-fish-straight-w
ater.htm

Take a good look at these magnificent Osprey images. Sadly the planning committee did not bother to discuss the impact Killington wind turbines
could have on the migration route of these magnificent creatures. The Bassenthwaite Ospreys bring £ thousands into the local economy.
http://www.dailymail .co.uk/news/article- 2557568/Carp-diem-Os prey-swoops-seize-pr ey-lifts-stunned-loo king-fish-straight-w ater.htm Take a good look at these magnificent Osprey images. Sadly the planning committee did not bother to discuss the impact Killington wind turbines could have on the migration route of these magnificent creatures. The Bassenthwaite Ospreys bring £ thousands into the local economy. otters
  • Score: 7

8:44am Thu 13 Feb 14

KendalSmithy says...

The fewer wind farms we have the sooner the government will be forced to install nuclear generation, so is banning wind power the best way forward? Yes, we should reduce energy use, but there's a limit to the reductions that can be made ... unless we all go around our houses in quilted onesies!
The fewer wind farms we have the sooner the government will be forced to install nuclear generation, so is banning wind power the best way forward? Yes, we should reduce energy use, but there's a limit to the reductions that can be made ... unless we all go around our houses in quilted onesies! KendalSmithy
  • Score: -11

6:16pm Sat 15 Feb 14

Hoad Hill says...

KendalSmithy wrote:
The fewer wind farms we have the sooner the government will be forced to install nuclear generation, so is banning wind power the best way forward? Yes, we should reduce energy use, but there's a limit to the reductions that can be made ... unless we all go around our houses in quilted onesies!
Are you seriously equating the output from a wind farm to that of a nuclear power station?
Wind farms are a distraction and contribute nothing to the energy needs of this country as they have to be totally backed up by conventional generation.
Unfortunately, while we have Lib Dems running SLDC, sensible decisions on anything are most unlikely.
[quote][p][bold]KendalSmithy[/bold] wrote: The fewer wind farms we have the sooner the government will be forced to install nuclear generation, so is banning wind power the best way forward? Yes, we should reduce energy use, but there's a limit to the reductions that can be made ... unless we all go around our houses in quilted onesies![/p][/quote]Are you seriously equating the output from a wind farm to that of a nuclear power station? Wind farms are a distraction and contribute nothing to the energy needs of this country as they have to be totally backed up by conventional generation. Unfortunately, while we have Lib Dems running SLDC, sensible decisions on anything are most unlikely. Hoad Hill
  • Score: 0

8:48pm Sat 15 Feb 14

KendalSmithy says...

Hoad Hill wrote:
KendalSmithy wrote:
The fewer wind farms we have the sooner the government will be forced to install nuclear generation, so is banning wind power the best way forward? Yes, we should reduce energy use, but there's a limit to the reductions that can be made ... unless we all go around our houses in quilted onesies!
Are you seriously equating the output from a wind farm to that of a nuclear power station?
Wind farms are a distraction and contribute nothing to the energy needs of this country as they have to be totally backed up by conventional generation.
Unfortunately, while we have Lib Dems running SLDC, sensible decisions on anything are most unlikely.
"Are you seriously equating the output from a wind farm to that of a nuclear power station?"
Absolutely not. What I am suggesting is that central government might just be keen to prioritise against wind farms in favour of nuclear power, which would be far more effective in supplying the future energy needs of the country.
[quote][p][bold]Hoad Hill[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]KendalSmithy[/bold] wrote: The fewer wind farms we have the sooner the government will be forced to install nuclear generation, so is banning wind power the best way forward? Yes, we should reduce energy use, but there's a limit to the reductions that can be made ... unless we all go around our houses in quilted onesies![/p][/quote]Are you seriously equating the output from a wind farm to that of a nuclear power station? Wind farms are a distraction and contribute nothing to the energy needs of this country as they have to be totally backed up by conventional generation. Unfortunately, while we have Lib Dems running SLDC, sensible decisions on anything are most unlikely.[/p][/quote]"Are you seriously equating the output from a wind farm to that of a nuclear power station?" Absolutely not. What I am suggesting is that central government might just be keen to prioritise against wind farms in favour of nuclear power, which would be far more effective in supplying the future energy needs of the country. KendalSmithy
  • Score: 0

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