Gangs of youths throwing food around Kendal McDonalds face police crackdown

Gangs of youths throwing food around Kendal McDonalds and being anti-social face police crackdown

Gangs of youths throwing food around Kendal McDonalds and being anti-social face police crackdown

First published in News
Last updated

KENDAL Police have received increasing reports of anti-social behaviour from youths gathering outside the McDonalds restaurant on Stricklandgate.

Officers said they were working with proprietors to deal with the issue of large groups of teenagers hanging around the premises in the evening.

Inspector Paul Latham said the complaints involved young people “throwing food around, being rude to other customers, being a general nuisance and making the place unpleasant for people.”

A three-month Community Engagement Report presented to Kendal Town Council said a number of arrests had been made and the restaurant management, police and Shop Watch were working together in a bid to stamp out the problems.

The report also said retail supermarket car parks were seeing a rise in anti-social behaviour in the evening.

Insp Latham said the issue involved “people using their cars to intimidate other motorists, such as by revving their engines at them.

“We are dealing with this and if necessary we will use legislation to take offenders’ cars off them.”

The report said both locations had started to see a slight reduction in calls since police got involved. Insp Latham said overall figures of youth anti-social behaviour in the town was seeing a marked decrease.

Comments (34)

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3:32pm Wed 5 Mar 14

jazzactivist says...

But, sadly, that's the sort of bad attitude and behaviour that goes along with cheap, rubbishy food. Those young people hadn't perhaps been eating it by any chance...?
But, sadly, that's the sort of bad attitude and behaviour that goes along with cheap, rubbishy food. Those young people hadn't perhaps been eating it by any chance...? jazzactivist
  • Score: -54

11:28pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Gingery says...

They are now further along Stricklandgate, hanging around shouting at passersby.
They are now further along Stricklandgate, hanging around shouting at passersby. Gingery
  • Score: 4

8:33am Thu 6 Mar 14

hogheaven says...

Get some CCTV cameras in Kendal and police on the ground that will stop it, works for other towns. There has been a steady increase in tyre slashing ,bodywork scratching and abusive behaviour in and around Kendal, when you catch the yobs , give them a shovel each and start them digging out the filled in canal.That should get rid of their unused energy and make a usefull contribution to the community.
Get some CCTV cameras in Kendal and police on the ground that will stop it, works for other towns. There has been a steady increase in tyre slashing ,bodywork scratching and abusive behaviour in and around Kendal, when you catch the yobs , give them a shovel each and start them digging out the filled in canal.That should get rid of their unused energy and make a usefull contribution to the community. hogheaven
  • Score: 37

9:54am Thu 6 Mar 14

Kendmoor says...

Stay classy, Kendal.
Stay classy, Kendal. Kendmoor
  • Score: 10

9:07am Fri 7 Mar 14

Kendal lad says...

Whilst not condoning poor behaviour (we all must take responsibility for our own actions), what needs addressing is the issue of lack of reasonably priced activities and facilities for children and young adults in the Kendal area.
It may well be annoying that people hang around McD's, and some of that behaviour may well be poor:- Give them an alternative.
Look at what St Thomas's church offers on a Thursday night, a free to all youth group. Regularly gets 50-80 youths there, offers great facilities and all done on a free and voluntary basis.
Stop moaning about how badly behaved these youths are. Look at the world they are growing up in. No prospect of ever owning a home (certainly not in this area), massive youth unemployment (that this Government has failed to adequately tackle), and entry level jobs in this area poorly paid and hard to come by, terrible pressure within schools to achieve the highest results possible etc etc.
Is it any wonder they kick back? CCTV and the like is not the answer. We need to engage in these guys and offer them alternatives.
Whilst not condoning poor behaviour (we all must take responsibility for our own actions), what needs addressing is the issue of lack of reasonably priced activities and facilities for children and young adults in the Kendal area. It may well be annoying that people hang around McD's, and some of that behaviour may well be poor:- Give them an alternative. Look at what St Thomas's church offers on a Thursday night, a free to all youth group. Regularly gets 50-80 youths there, offers great facilities and all done on a free and voluntary basis. Stop moaning about how badly behaved these youths are. Look at the world they are growing up in. No prospect of ever owning a home (certainly not in this area), massive youth unemployment (that this Government has failed to adequately tackle), and entry level jobs in this area poorly paid and hard to come by, terrible pressure within schools to achieve the highest results possible etc etc. Is it any wonder they kick back? CCTV and the like is not the answer. We need to engage in these guys and offer them alternatives. Kendal lad
  • Score: -1

9:27am Fri 7 Mar 14

hogheaven says...

Kendal lad wrote:
Whilst not condoning poor behaviour (we all must take responsibility for our own actions), what needs addressing is the issue of lack of reasonably priced activities and facilities for children and young adults in the Kendal area.
It may well be annoying that people hang around McD's, and some of that behaviour may well be poor:- Give them an alternative.
Look at what St Thomas's church offers on a Thursday night, a free to all youth group. Regularly gets 50-80 youths there, offers great facilities and all done on a free and voluntary basis.
Stop moaning about how badly behaved these youths are. Look at the world they are growing up in. No prospect of ever owning a home (certainly not in this area), massive youth unemployment (that this Government has failed to adequately tackle), and entry level jobs in this area poorly paid and hard to come by, terrible pressure within schools to achieve the highest results possible etc etc.
Is it any wonder they kick back? CCTV and the like is not the answer. We need to engage in these guys and offer them alternatives.
You are dealing with a old age related problem with bored teenagers but think back to your childhood, did you behave like these youths, no ,why because you respected your elders and the police.There is no excuse for bad behaviour.
[quote][p][bold]Kendal lad[/bold] wrote: Whilst not condoning poor behaviour (we all must take responsibility for our own actions), what needs addressing is the issue of lack of reasonably priced activities and facilities for children and young adults in the Kendal area. It may well be annoying that people hang around McD's, and some of that behaviour may well be poor:- Give them an alternative. Look at what St Thomas's church offers on a Thursday night, a free to all youth group. Regularly gets 50-80 youths there, offers great facilities and all done on a free and voluntary basis. Stop moaning about how badly behaved these youths are. Look at the world they are growing up in. No prospect of ever owning a home (certainly not in this area), massive youth unemployment (that this Government has failed to adequately tackle), and entry level jobs in this area poorly paid and hard to come by, terrible pressure within schools to achieve the highest results possible etc etc. Is it any wonder they kick back? CCTV and the like is not the answer. We need to engage in these guys and offer them alternatives.[/p][/quote]You are dealing with a old age related problem with bored teenagers but think back to your childhood, did you behave like these youths, no ,why because you respected your elders and the police.There is no excuse for bad behaviour. hogheaven
  • Score: 25

10:16am Fri 7 Mar 14

PropMeUpWithTeabags says...

I get fed up with going into Kendal and seeing gangs of youths hanging about. Kendal is slowly becoming a really horrible place to live. You can't blame lack of facilities for young people being the problem, it is sheer lack of respect and bad behaviour. There are lots of middle aged and older people who haven't got jobs and there's nothing for them to do either but they don't go and sit outside McDs and throw food around and abuse people. i suggest a solution to the problem would be a sniper on the library roof!
I get fed up with going into Kendal and seeing gangs of youths hanging about. Kendal is slowly becoming a really horrible place to live. You can't blame lack of facilities for young people being the problem, it is sheer lack of respect and bad behaviour. There are lots of middle aged and older people who haven't got jobs and there's nothing for them to do either but they don't go and sit outside McDs and throw food around and abuse people. i suggest a solution to the problem would be a sniper on the library roof! PropMeUpWithTeabags
  • Score: 10

1:44pm Fri 7 Mar 14

Spotty Fish says...

Do us all a favour and just get rid of McDonald's.
Do us all a favour and just get rid of McDonald's. Spotty Fish
  • Score: -2

2:22pm Fri 7 Mar 14

Kendal Jock says...

No excuses for yobbish behaviour whatever. That is what Liberalism and
the PC Brigade have done to this country, no parental control.
No excuses for yobbish behaviour whatever. That is what Liberalism and the PC Brigade have done to this country, no parental control. Kendal Jock
  • Score: 25

4:23pm Fri 7 Mar 14

Kendal lad says...

Spotty Fish wrote:
Do us all a favour and just get rid of McDonald's.
Brilliant idea, and then the youths can find another place to sit !!
What a foolish thing to suggest.
[quote][p][bold]Spotty Fish[/bold] wrote: Do us all a favour and just get rid of McDonald's.[/p][/quote]Brilliant idea, and then the youths can find another place to sit !! What a foolish thing to suggest. Kendal lad
  • Score: 1

4:27pm Fri 7 Mar 14

Kendal lad says...

hogheaven wrote:
Kendal lad wrote:
Whilst not condoning poor behaviour (we all must take responsibility for our own actions), what needs addressing is the issue of lack of reasonably priced activities and facilities for children and young adults in the Kendal area.
It may well be annoying that people hang around McD's, and some of that behaviour may well be poor:- Give them an alternative.
Look at what St Thomas's church offers on a Thursday night, a free to all youth group. Regularly gets 50-80 youths there, offers great facilities and all done on a free and voluntary basis.
Stop moaning about how badly behaved these youths are. Look at the world they are growing up in. No prospect of ever owning a home (certainly not in this area), massive youth unemployment (that this Government has failed to adequately tackle), and entry level jobs in this area poorly paid and hard to come by, terrible pressure within schools to achieve the highest results possible etc etc.
Is it any wonder they kick back? CCTV and the like is not the answer. We need to engage in these guys and offer them alternatives.
You are dealing with a old age related problem with bored teenagers but think back to your childhood, did you behave like these youths, no ,why because you respected your elders and the police.There is no excuse for bad behaviour.
You are quite correct, this is an age old issue. Think back to the mods and rockers in the 50's and 60's, think back to the punk rock era in the 70's etc.
Equally think about now. Councils stripped of money by central Government unable to provide facilities for people to enjoy.
You are correct, there is no excuse for poor behaviour (as stated at the beginning of my initial post). Equally, if as a society we don't engage with this generation, where do you think that will get us?
The circle of respect starts with you.
[quote][p][bold]hogheaven[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kendal lad[/bold] wrote: Whilst not condoning poor behaviour (we all must take responsibility for our own actions), what needs addressing is the issue of lack of reasonably priced activities and facilities for children and young adults in the Kendal area. It may well be annoying that people hang around McD's, and some of that behaviour may well be poor:- Give them an alternative. Look at what St Thomas's church offers on a Thursday night, a free to all youth group. Regularly gets 50-80 youths there, offers great facilities and all done on a free and voluntary basis. Stop moaning about how badly behaved these youths are. Look at the world they are growing up in. No prospect of ever owning a home (certainly not in this area), massive youth unemployment (that this Government has failed to adequately tackle), and entry level jobs in this area poorly paid and hard to come by, terrible pressure within schools to achieve the highest results possible etc etc. Is it any wonder they kick back? CCTV and the like is not the answer. We need to engage in these guys and offer them alternatives.[/p][/quote]You are dealing with a old age related problem with bored teenagers but think back to your childhood, did you behave like these youths, no ,why because you respected your elders and the police.There is no excuse for bad behaviour.[/p][/quote]You are quite correct, this is an age old issue. Think back to the mods and rockers in the 50's and 60's, think back to the punk rock era in the 70's etc. Equally think about now. Councils stripped of money by central Government unable to provide facilities for people to enjoy. You are correct, there is no excuse for poor behaviour (as stated at the beginning of my initial post). Equally, if as a society we don't engage with this generation, where do you think that will get us? The circle of respect starts with you. Kendal lad
  • Score: 7

4:34pm Fri 7 Mar 14

Kendal lad says...

Kendal Jock wrote:
No excuses for yobbish behaviour whatever. That is what Liberalism and
the PC Brigade have done to this country, no parental control.
AAHHH clap them all in irons or send them off to do National Service. Is that the answer you are suggesting?
Ridiculous.
You have to engage with someone and have a relationship with them to challenge or change their behaviour, not **** them simply because, in your opinion the humanist experiment hasn't worked.
The youth of today are growing up in such a different environment to even 10 years ago.
I for one would not want to be their age now, with all the pressures they have on them.
[quote][p][bold]Kendal Jock[/bold] wrote: No excuses for yobbish behaviour whatever. That is what Liberalism and the PC Brigade have done to this country, no parental control.[/p][/quote]AAHHH clap them all in irons or send them off to do National Service. Is that the answer you are suggesting? Ridiculous. You have to engage with someone and have a relationship with them to challenge or change their behaviour, not **** them simply because, in your opinion the humanist experiment hasn't worked. The youth of today are growing up in such a different environment to even 10 years ago. I for one would not want to be their age now, with all the pressures they have on them. Kendal lad
  • Score: -8

5:12pm Fri 7 Mar 14

Kendal lad says...

Instead of moaning and whinging about how bad the youth of today are, maybe you could support this charity that tries to help young people understand better their place in the global community.
http://www.freethech
ildren.com/
You never know, you might even learn something.
Instead of moaning and whinging about how bad the youth of today are, maybe you could support this charity that tries to help young people understand better their place in the global community. http://www.freethech ildren.com/ You never know, you might even learn something. Kendal lad
  • Score: 1

5:26pm Fri 7 Mar 14

hogheaven says...

Kendal lad wrote:
Instead of moaning and whinging about how bad the youth of today are, maybe you could support this charity that tries to help young people understand better their place in the global community.
http://www.freethech

ildren.com/
You never know, you might even learn something.
I dont think "freeing the youth" of today will help ,the problem is they have too much freedom now. Plus parents (sometimes two) who do not seem to care what their children are up to, and think parenthood is something other people do for them.Its true things have altered a lot in the past 20 years, perhaps if we could prize our youth away from TV screens, computers and texting on their must have mobile phones, and talk to them we could revert back to a more normal life.
[quote][p][bold]Kendal lad[/bold] wrote: Instead of moaning and whinging about how bad the youth of today are, maybe you could support this charity that tries to help young people understand better their place in the global community. http://www.freethech ildren.com/ You never know, you might even learn something.[/p][/quote]I dont think "freeing the youth" of today will help ,the problem is they have too much freedom now. Plus parents (sometimes two) who do not seem to care what their children are up to, and think parenthood is something other people do for them.Its true things have altered a lot in the past 20 years, perhaps if we could prize our youth away from TV screens, computers and texting on their must have mobile phones, and talk to them we could revert back to a more normal life. hogheaven
  • Score: 6

5:43pm Fri 7 Mar 14

Kendal lad says...

hogheaven wrote:
Kendal lad wrote:
Instead of moaning and whinging about how bad the youth of today are, maybe you could support this charity that tries to help young people understand better their place in the global community.
http://www.freethech


ildren.com/
You never know, you might even learn something.
I dont think "freeing the youth" of today will help ,the problem is they have too much freedom now. Plus parents (sometimes two) who do not seem to care what their children are up to, and think parenthood is something other people do for them.Its true things have altered a lot in the past 20 years, perhaps if we could prize our youth away from TV screens, computers and texting on their must have mobile phones, and talk to them we could revert back to a more normal life.
Are you telling me you didn't talk to all your mates at the back the bike sheds, sometimes all at once? Are you saying that you never watched the TV and were told 'You will get square eyes'? Are you saying you were never told off for using the phone too much?
The young people of today are doing exactly the same as we did, just using different mediums, that's all.
Lets not forget we could all turn round and say 'Well we have all done that before!!' to these young people. The difference is THEY have never done it before, whether that is shouting too loudly, behaving badly, getting drunk etc.
If you are telling me that you behaved like a saint all your life, fair enough, there is a place in heaven for you. However, if you honestly look back into your past and were ever cheeky to an elder, stole a neighbours apple from their tree or let someone's bike tyres down, then you are no different to them.
Maybe you 'borrowed' a pencil from work and forgot to return it or used the work phone for a personal phone call or got into an argument with a work colleague?
Let's not vilify our young people before they have even started out in life. Squashing them and their enthusiasm under a heavy boot will only make things worse.
[quote][p][bold]hogheaven[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kendal lad[/bold] wrote: Instead of moaning and whinging about how bad the youth of today are, maybe you could support this charity that tries to help young people understand better their place in the global community. http://www.freethech ildren.com/ You never know, you might even learn something.[/p][/quote]I dont think "freeing the youth" of today will help ,the problem is they have too much freedom now. Plus parents (sometimes two) who do not seem to care what their children are up to, and think parenthood is something other people do for them.Its true things have altered a lot in the past 20 years, perhaps if we could prize our youth away from TV screens, computers and texting on their must have mobile phones, and talk to them we could revert back to a more normal life.[/p][/quote]Are you telling me you didn't talk to all your mates at the back the bike sheds, sometimes all at once? Are you saying that you never watched the TV and were told 'You will get square eyes'? Are you saying you were never told off for using the phone too much? The young people of today are doing exactly the same as we did, just using different mediums, that's all. Lets not forget we could all turn round and say 'Well we have all done that before!!' to these young people. The difference is THEY have never done it before, whether that is shouting too loudly, behaving badly, getting drunk etc. If you are telling me that you behaved like a saint all your life, fair enough, there is a place in heaven for you. However, if you honestly look back into your past and were ever cheeky to an elder, stole a neighbours apple from their tree or let someone's bike tyres down, then you are no different to them. Maybe you 'borrowed' a pencil from work and forgot to return it or used the work phone for a personal phone call or got into an argument with a work colleague? Let's not vilify our young people before they have even started out in life. Squashing them and their enthusiasm under a heavy boot will only make things worse. Kendal lad
  • Score: 15

8:40am Sat 8 Mar 14

hogheaven says...

Kendal lad wrote:
hogheaven wrote:
Kendal lad wrote:
Instead of moaning and whinging about how bad the youth of today are, maybe you could support this charity that tries to help young people understand better their place in the global community.
http://www.freethech



ildren.com/
You never know, you might even learn something.
I dont think "freeing the youth" of today will help ,the problem is they have too much freedom now. Plus parents (sometimes two) who do not seem to care what their children are up to, and think parenthood is something other people do for them.Its true things have altered a lot in the past 20 years, perhaps if we could prize our youth away from TV screens, computers and texting on their must have mobile phones, and talk to them we could revert back to a more normal life.
Are you telling me you didn't talk to all your mates at the back the bike sheds, sometimes all at once? Are you saying that you never watched the TV and were told 'You will get square eyes'? Are you saying you were never told off for using the phone too much?
The young people of today are doing exactly the same as we did, just using different mediums, that's all.
Lets not forget we could all turn round and say 'Well we have all done that before!!' to these young people. The difference is THEY have never done it before, whether that is shouting too loudly, behaving badly, getting drunk etc.
If you are telling me that you behaved like a saint all your life, fair enough, there is a place in heaven for you. However, if you honestly look back into your past and were ever cheeky to an elder, stole a neighbours apple from their tree or let someone's bike tyres down, then you are no different to them.
Maybe you 'borrowed' a pencil from work and forgot to return it or used the work phone for a personal phone call or got into an argument with a work colleague?
Let's not vilify our young people before they have even started out in life. Squashing them and their enthusiasm under a heavy boot will only make things worse.
Well I must have been a well behaved youth , as most of the listed actions above did not happen to me. Maybe something to do with strict but fair parenting, or maybe I was taught to respect my elders early in life.
Whatever ,there is no place in todays society for youths shouting abuse at people passing by in our town centre.
That is why (if you read my earlier comments) i suggested a way of getting rid of their excess energy, by channeling it into a useful project which will benefit our community. Whether you agree with me or not you surely do not condone this yobbish behaviour?
[quote][p][bold]Kendal lad[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]hogheaven[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kendal lad[/bold] wrote: Instead of moaning and whinging about how bad the youth of today are, maybe you could support this charity that tries to help young people understand better their place in the global community. http://www.freethech ildren.com/ You never know, you might even learn something.[/p][/quote]I dont think "freeing the youth" of today will help ,the problem is they have too much freedom now. Plus parents (sometimes two) who do not seem to care what their children are up to, and think parenthood is something other people do for them.Its true things have altered a lot in the past 20 years, perhaps if we could prize our youth away from TV screens, computers and texting on their must have mobile phones, and talk to them we could revert back to a more normal life.[/p][/quote]Are you telling me you didn't talk to all your mates at the back the bike sheds, sometimes all at once? Are you saying that you never watched the TV and were told 'You will get square eyes'? Are you saying you were never told off for using the phone too much? The young people of today are doing exactly the same as we did, just using different mediums, that's all. Lets not forget we could all turn round and say 'Well we have all done that before!!' to these young people. The difference is THEY have never done it before, whether that is shouting too loudly, behaving badly, getting drunk etc. If you are telling me that you behaved like a saint all your life, fair enough, there is a place in heaven for you. However, if you honestly look back into your past and were ever cheeky to an elder, stole a neighbours apple from their tree or let someone's bike tyres down, then you are no different to them. Maybe you 'borrowed' a pencil from work and forgot to return it or used the work phone for a personal phone call or got into an argument with a work colleague? Let's not vilify our young people before they have even started out in life. Squashing them and their enthusiasm under a heavy boot will only make things worse.[/p][/quote]Well I must have been a well behaved youth , as most of the listed actions above did not happen to me. Maybe something to do with strict but fair parenting, or maybe I was taught to respect my elders early in life. Whatever ,there is no place in todays society for youths shouting abuse at people passing by in our town centre. That is why (if you read my earlier comments) i suggested a way of getting rid of their excess energy, by channeling it into a useful project which will benefit our community. Whether you agree with me or not you surely do not condone this yobbish behaviour? hogheaven
  • Score: -2

10:53am Sat 8 Mar 14

PropMeUpWithTeabags says...

I agree with Hogheaven. I didn't do anything like what Kendal Lab assumes I did. I have three children and would be horrified if I found out they were doing any of those things. I think it comes down to kids knowing they can get away with it. They know that adults don't tell them off and if they do dare it is acceptable to give them a barage of abuse. If I had spoken back to any adult when I was a kid and I'm not that old at 31 I would have expected a clip round the ear and for the adult to tell my parents.
I agree with Hogheaven. I didn't do anything like what Kendal Lab assumes I did. I have three children and would be horrified if I found out they were doing any of those things. I think it comes down to kids knowing they can get away with it. They know that adults don't tell them off and if they do dare it is acceptable to give them a barage of abuse. If I had spoken back to any adult when I was a kid and I'm not that old at 31 I would have expected a clip round the ear and for the adult to tell my parents. PropMeUpWithTeabags
  • Score: 5

11:12am Sat 8 Mar 14

Kendmoor says...

I think some people are living in a fairytale land if they think children have always been saint's, they also seem to be failing to see how society and the world has changed and how fantastically it has changed, not always for the better. It's the failure (unwillingness?) to recognise both that, and the disconnect between adults and youth that hinders the situation.
The world of youth today is so far flung from that of the past, people do not want to think it (even I don't want to think it) but it is.

Of course this sort of thing should not be happening, and certainly shouldn't be condoned - but some of the suggestions mentioned (if you read hogheavens earlier comments) deal with the problem *after* it's happened, which is of little help when what is needed is tackling the problem before it happens and the causes of it.

I really like hearing ideas about this, and I am being quite genuine when I ask hogheaven after you have "prized our youth away from TV screens, computers and texting on their must have mobile phones" - what is it, in the modern day world, legally, and obviously without money, that you propose they do in our ould grey, rainy town? (I'm not looking for an argument here, I'd just like to hear your thoughts).

Personally, I'd rather side with KendalLad and help, rather than channel the energy *after* an eruption like this.
I think some people are living in a fairytale land if they think children have always been saint's, they also seem to be failing to see how society and the world has changed and how fantastically it has changed, not always for the better. It's the failure (unwillingness?) to recognise both that, and the disconnect between adults and youth that hinders the situation. The world of youth today is so far flung from that of the past, people do not want to think it (even I don't want to think it) but it is. Of course this sort of thing should not be happening, and certainly shouldn't be condoned - but some of the suggestions mentioned (if you read hogheavens earlier comments) deal with the problem *after* it's happened, which is of little help when what is needed is tackling the problem before it happens and the causes of it. I really like hearing ideas about this, and I am being quite genuine when I ask hogheaven after you have "prized our youth away from TV screens, computers and texting on their must have mobile phones" - what is it, in the modern day world, legally, and obviously without money, that you propose they do in our ould grey, rainy town? (I'm not looking for an argument here, I'd just like to hear your thoughts). Personally, I'd rather side with KendalLad and help, rather than channel the energy *after* an eruption like this. Kendmoor
  • Score: 11

4:18pm Sat 8 Mar 14

hogheaven says...

Its a problem of our modern world ,I agree with Kendmoor on some points, but ask yourself how did you fill your time in when in your youth. Todays youth are not physically taxed anymore ,they are taken everywhere by parents car , sit at computer games or watch TV,most do not walk to school , schools have cut back on PE so they are not using all their stored energy My Idea is to channel their energy before they unleash it on to the streets, by more sport or taking part in group activities, which could be arranged by adult volunteers and lead to more interaction between youth and adults, who would hopefully give them guidance. We can learn from youth, I ask my grandchildren to show me how to use my too complicated mobile phone and program my DVD player , simple for them frustrating to say the least for me. But todays youth must be taught discipline and respect. Do you agree at least on this point?
without exception
Its a problem of our modern world ,I agree with Kendmoor on some points, but ask yourself how did you fill your time in when in your youth. Todays youth are not physically taxed anymore ,they are taken everywhere by parents car , sit at computer games or watch TV,most do not walk to school , schools have cut back on PE so they are not using all their stored energy My Idea is to channel their energy before they unleash it on to the streets, by more sport or taking part in group activities, which could be arranged by adult volunteers and lead to more interaction between youth and adults, who would hopefully give them guidance. We can learn from youth, I ask my grandchildren to show me how to use my too complicated mobile phone and program my DVD player , simple for them frustrating to say the least for me. But todays youth must be taught discipline and respect. Do you agree at least on this point? without exception hogheaven
  • Score: 0

5:43pm Sat 8 Mar 14

jazzactivist says...

At last! Kendal Lad what a reasonable person you are. I absolutely agree with you that young people today have much more complex lives than previous generations, and are the least valued younger generation ever. Adults have to behave in ways that provide an excellent example to young people, instead of just moaning, and we also have to make sure that our society provides young people with all the opportunities that we had to look forward to when we were young. Where is the free tertiary education, the apprenticeships, the work colleagues and neighbours who took a bit of time to chat and encourage young people, the welcome into homes, the affordable housing for all, the evening activities, the praise and pride? There have always been some disaffected youths hanging around on street corners making a noise and smoking and drinking, and in the past even adult men did that! Remember that classic piece of 1950s research Street Corner Society?

I was young in the late 70s / early 80s and did my fair share of what would have been considered to be antisocial behaviour back then, even if it was nothing all that rude or threatening - more weird fashions and boom boxes. But I also remember how older people would smile and chide with some encouragement, and a tacit understanding that we should enjoy ourselves while we were young. I often heard "just you wait - you won't have time to be hanging around looking like that and blaring music when you've a job and children of your own!" We'd smile along and quieten down, knowing we'd been told off.

While I don't condone rude or threatening behaviour by anyone of any age, I think young people today have to put up with many things older generations didn't, and that can leave them feeling hopeless and not caring about how they treat other people. Two things that have changed dramatically are that now there is such an emphasis on homes being investments more than family homes that young people aren't invited en masse to one another's homes to make a mess and play music any more. Parents usually expect them to go out somewhere else to do that, and don't care where.

The other is that town centres, like Kendal, have become quite downgraded. They look rundown, and are full of cheap shops and cafes and that undervalues the town and all the people who live there. It is usually the case now that one graffito attracts more graffiti and a damaged item attracts vandalism, and the Council and local people are slow to make repairs. Many shops don't even keep their frontages clean now. No one seems to have a sense of pride anymore, and it's not surprising that rubs off on young people. All they usually want is to be noticed and valued, and sometimes they get it wrong, but that's how all young people learn.
At last! Kendal Lad what a reasonable person you are. I absolutely agree with you that young people today have much more complex lives than previous generations, and are the least valued younger generation ever. Adults have to behave in ways that provide an excellent example to young people, instead of just moaning, and we also have to make sure that our society provides young people with all the opportunities that we had to look forward to when we were young. Where is the free tertiary education, the apprenticeships, the work colleagues and neighbours who took a bit of time to chat and encourage young people, the welcome into homes, the affordable housing for all, the evening activities, the praise and pride? There have always been some disaffected youths hanging around on street corners making a noise and smoking and drinking, and in the past even adult men did that! Remember that classic piece of 1950s research Street Corner Society? I was young in the late 70s / early 80s and did my fair share of what would have been considered to be antisocial behaviour back then, even if it was nothing all that rude or threatening - more weird fashions and boom boxes. But I also remember how older people would smile and chide with some encouragement, and a tacit understanding that we should enjoy ourselves while we were young. I often heard "just you wait - you won't have time to be hanging around looking like that and blaring music when you've a job and children of your own!" We'd smile along and quieten down, knowing we'd been told off. While I don't condone rude or threatening behaviour by anyone of any age, I think young people today have to put up with many things older generations didn't, and that can leave them feeling hopeless and not caring about how they treat other people. Two things that have changed dramatically are that now there is such an emphasis on homes being investments more than family homes that young people aren't invited en masse to one another's homes to make a mess and play music any more. Parents usually expect them to go out somewhere else to do that, and don't care where. The other is that town centres, like Kendal, have become quite downgraded. They look rundown, and are full of cheap shops and cafes and that undervalues the town and all the people who live there. It is usually the case now that one graffito attracts more graffiti and a damaged item attracts vandalism, and the Council and local people are slow to make repairs. Many shops don't even keep their frontages clean now. No one seems to have a sense of pride anymore, and it's not surprising that rubs off on young people. All they usually want is to be noticed and valued, and sometimes they get it wrong, but that's how all young people learn. jazzactivist
  • Score: -2

6:50pm Sat 8 Mar 14

Kendmoor says...

"ask yourself how did you fill your time in when in your youth"
I do, and you should too, but whilst trying to think about how it might be received and re-enacted these days by the youth, with no money..and with the "problem kids" they are the ones whose parents aren't bothering to take them anywhere. It entirely just backs up my point how *our* youth is no longer relevant to this youth, they can't just "Go climb a tree" the tree is now privately owned

Your only idea earlier when you told us to look back over your comments was only one of "when you catch the yobs , give them a shovel each and start them digging out the filled in canal.That should get rid of their unused energy and make a usefull contribution to the community."

which I agree entirely, is a fantastic punishment, but it didn't going anywhere to helping the original problem.

When you look at the vast majority of "well behaved" teens and then you have a troubled few it's pretty clear to me that when my kids are running around in a play park/fun factory with 20 other kids and there are just one or two who you can tell are only there to bully other children and make lives a misery - where are their parents? If they're there at all, they're staring at a mobile phone, and couldn't care less. There is the initial problem, in my opinion.
"ask yourself how did you fill your time in when in your youth" I do, and you should too, but whilst trying to think about how it might be received and re-enacted these days by the youth, with no money..and with the "problem kids" they are the ones whose parents aren't bothering to take them anywhere. It entirely just backs up my point how *our* youth is no longer relevant to this youth, they can't just "Go climb a tree" the tree is now privately owned Your only idea earlier when you told us to look back over your comments was only one of "when you catch the yobs , give them a shovel each and start them digging out the filled in canal.That should get rid of their unused energy and make a usefull contribution to the community." which I agree entirely, is a fantastic punishment, but it didn't going anywhere to helping the original problem. When you look at the vast majority of "well behaved" teens and then you have a troubled few it's pretty clear to me that when my kids are running around in a play park/fun factory with 20 other kids and there are just one or two who you can tell are only there to bully other children and make lives a misery - where are their parents? If they're there at all, they're staring at a mobile phone, and couldn't care less. There is the initial problem, in my opinion. Kendmoor
  • Score: 7

7:31pm Sat 8 Mar 14

hogheaven says...

Kendmoor wrote:
"ask yourself how did you fill your time in when in your youth"
I do, and you should too, but whilst trying to think about how it might be received and re-enacted these days by the youth, with no money..and with the "problem kids" they are the ones whose parents aren't bothering to take them anywhere. It entirely just backs up my point how *our* youth is no longer relevant to this youth, they can't just "Go climb a tree" the tree is now privately owned

Your only idea earlier when you told us to look back over your comments was only one of "when you catch the yobs , give them a shovel each and start them digging out the filled in canal.That should get rid of their unused energy and make a usefull contribution to the community."

which I agree entirely, is a fantastic punishment, but it didn't going anywhere to helping the original problem.

When you look at the vast majority of "well behaved" teens and then you have a troubled few it's pretty clear to me that when my kids are running around in a play park/fun factory with 20 other kids and there are just one or two who you can tell are only there to bully other children and make lives a misery - where are their parents? If they're there at all, they're staring at a mobile phone, and couldn't care less. There is the initial problem, in my opinion.
" When you look at the vast majority of "well behaved" teens and then you have a troubled few it's pretty clear to me that when my kids are running around in a play park/fun factory with 20 other kids and there are just one or two who you can tell are only there to bully other children and make lives a misery - where are their parents? If they're there at all, they're staring at a mobile phone, and couldn't care less. There is the initial problem, in my opinion."
Could not agree more Kendmoor you see it happening oh so often,digging out canals was only one suggestion.There was a case a couple of years ago of youths shouting abuse and throwing stones at narrowboats on the Leeds and Liverpool canal.Local volunteers on the canal restoration group got the youths together and explained to them the history of the canal and invited them to help with ongoing projects, as a result there are less problems now, and they are helping boaters through locks and mooring up, it can be done.Also a lot of mindless violence we are seeing more and more of could be put down to the video nasty games they watch, where murder and violent crashes are the norm.
[quote][p][bold]Kendmoor[/bold] wrote: "ask yourself how did you fill your time in when in your youth" I do, and you should too, but whilst trying to think about how it might be received and re-enacted these days by the youth, with no money..and with the "problem kids" they are the ones whose parents aren't bothering to take them anywhere. It entirely just backs up my point how *our* youth is no longer relevant to this youth, they can't just "Go climb a tree" the tree is now privately owned Your only idea earlier when you told us to look back over your comments was only one of "when you catch the yobs , give them a shovel each and start them digging out the filled in canal.That should get rid of their unused energy and make a usefull contribution to the community." which I agree entirely, is a fantastic punishment, but it didn't going anywhere to helping the original problem. When you look at the vast majority of "well behaved" teens and then you have a troubled few it's pretty clear to me that when my kids are running around in a play park/fun factory with 20 other kids and there are just one or two who you can tell are only there to bully other children and make lives a misery - where are their parents? If they're there at all, they're staring at a mobile phone, and couldn't care less. There is the initial problem, in my opinion.[/p][/quote]" When you look at the vast majority of "well behaved" teens and then you have a troubled few it's pretty clear to me that when my kids are running around in a play park/fun factory with 20 other kids and there are just one or two who you can tell are only there to bully other children and make lives a misery - where are their parents? If they're there at all, they're staring at a mobile phone, and couldn't care less. There is the initial problem, in my opinion." Could not agree more Kendmoor you see it happening oh so often,digging out canals was only one suggestion.There was a case a couple of years ago of youths shouting abuse and throwing stones at narrowboats on the Leeds and Liverpool canal.Local volunteers on the canal restoration group got the youths together and explained to them the history of the canal and invited them to help with ongoing projects, as a result there are less problems now, and they are helping boaters through locks and mooring up, it can be done.Also a lot of mindless violence we are seeing more and more of could be put down to the video nasty games they watch, where murder and violent crashes are the norm. hogheaven
  • Score: -1

10:16am Sun 9 Mar 14

Kendal lad says...

It is quite clear that there re two views emerging from this thread.
One way to deal with this is to give the little tykes a clip round the ear, tell their parents and tell them to be good boys and girls.
The other is to offer help, understand the pressures our young people are under today and work with them to find solutions to the issue.
Couldn't agree more that CCTV would simply allow the young people to play to the camera and then (if we have them available) the cops will turn up to deal with it, probably too late.
This is a societal issue. Demonising the youth of today only makes the situation worse.
On the strength of this thread, I went out an talked to some young people about this issue, asked them why they do it etc. I engaged with them.
Two things came out of this, one was that there was a sizeable majority of the young people who didn't like the fact that some of their number messed around BUT they all said there is nothing to do in Kendal.
Give them choice and it will go away.
It is quite clear that there re two views emerging from this thread. One way to deal with this is to give the little tykes a clip round the ear, tell their parents and tell them to be good boys and girls. The other is to offer help, understand the pressures our young people are under today and work with them to find solutions to the issue. Couldn't agree more that CCTV would simply allow the young people to play to the camera and then (if we have them available) the cops will turn up to deal with it, probably too late. This is a societal issue. Demonising the youth of today only makes the situation worse. On the strength of this thread, I went out an talked to some young people about this issue, asked them why they do it etc. I engaged with them. Two things came out of this, one was that there was a sizeable majority of the young people who didn't like the fact that some of their number messed around BUT they all said there is nothing to do in Kendal. Give them choice and it will go away. Kendal lad
  • Score: 2

11:33am Sun 9 Mar 14

jazzactivist says...

last night I encountered the group of 'antisocial' young people outside McDonalds in Kendal. We were walking down from the car park to attend a gig in Kendal Library, and a group of about ten young people were hanging around across the road outside McDonalds - not doing much, just sitting and standing in their hoodies. We don't know any of them, but gave them a wave in greeting as we passed by on the other side of the road. Three spontaneously waved back. Later on, one of the group climbed up and turned the hands of the clock nearby. We privately thought it was amusing - the sort of 'high jinks' activity that would have been smiled about in the past, but other people in the Library queue tutted and grumbled. What moved the young people on was when a long queue of chatting adults built up outside the Library. The area was no longer their space and they went off somewhere else. Their space outside McDonalds was then taken up by three women in their thirties who stood talking on their phones. It all reminded me of those night time wildlife documentaries on TV where different groups take over from one another to use the same area differently, and that's how it should be.

I do sympathise when people get annoyed by behaviours they think are wrong and don't understand, but I think many older people have forgotten what life was really like in their youth. People didn't behave themselves solely because they were kept under strict control and told what to do. There was also a different social attitude back then where people went out of their way to acknowledge others. There were also many more people of different ages out and about on the streets - life took place as much outdoors as it did indoors. If there is a bustling outside life in a community antisocial behaviours can't get a hold in it. Maybe we should be focusing on how to make Kendal more vibrant in the evenings than on how to control a small group of young people with nothing to do.
last night I encountered the group of 'antisocial' young people outside McDonalds in Kendal. We were walking down from the car park to attend a gig in Kendal Library, and a group of about ten young people were hanging around across the road outside McDonalds - not doing much, just sitting and standing in their hoodies. We don't know any of them, but gave them a wave in greeting as we passed by on the other side of the road. Three spontaneously waved back. Later on, one of the group climbed up and turned the hands of the clock nearby. We privately thought it was amusing - the sort of 'high jinks' activity that would have been smiled about in the past, but other people in the Library queue tutted and grumbled. What moved the young people on was when a long queue of chatting adults built up outside the Library. The area was no longer their space and they went off somewhere else. Their space outside McDonalds was then taken up by three women in their thirties who stood talking on their phones. It all reminded me of those night time wildlife documentaries on TV where different groups take over from one another to use the same area differently, and that's how it should be. I do sympathise when people get annoyed by behaviours they think are wrong and don't understand, but I think many older people have forgotten what life was really like in their youth. People didn't behave themselves solely because they were kept under strict control and told what to do. There was also a different social attitude back then where people went out of their way to acknowledge others. There were also many more people of different ages out and about on the streets - life took place as much outdoors as it did indoors. If there is a bustling outside life in a community antisocial behaviours can't get a hold in it. Maybe we should be focusing on how to make Kendal more vibrant in the evenings than on how to control a small group of young people with nothing to do. jazzactivist
  • Score: -7

2:29pm Sun 9 Mar 14

zaney5 says...

Oh please.... what about the pressures everyone has to deal with on a daily basis? Why should teenagers get special treatment. Heres a lesson for you, the world owes you jack.... get out there and start making something of yourself instead of hanging around being anti-social.
Oh please.... what about the pressures everyone has to deal with on a daily basis? Why should teenagers get special treatment. Heres a lesson for you, the world owes you jack.... get out there and start making something of yourself instead of hanging around being anti-social. zaney5
  • Score: 0

6:00pm Sun 9 Mar 14

jazzactivist says...

It's not too much trouble to show a bit of humanity is it, zaney5? Quite a lot of people are under pressure today, but younger generations carry most of it. I'm not saying that young people today shouldn't have any responsibilities, just that they DO live in a more difficult context than those of us who are older did in our different eras. There has never been a time when some young people didn't cause trouble. Every era had it's street gangs (of all ages) and groups of young people hanging about. Us older people need to work out what is a good way to behave to set an example to younger people, not just stomp and grumble our way past acting antisocially.
It's not too much trouble to show a bit of humanity is it, zaney5? Quite a lot of people are under pressure today, but younger generations carry most of it. I'm not saying that young people today shouldn't have any responsibilities, just that they DO live in a more difficult context than those of us who are older did in our different eras. There has never been a time when some young people didn't cause trouble. Every era had it's street gangs (of all ages) and groups of young people hanging about. Us older people need to work out what is a good way to behave to set an example to younger people, not just stomp and grumble our way past acting antisocially. jazzactivist
  • Score: -8

8:20pm Sun 9 Mar 14

whitevanman2 says...

now you don't really expect those kids to eat that food do you !!! ...............
now you don't really expect those kids to eat that food do you !!! ............... whitevanman2
  • Score: 0

3:33pm Mon 10 Mar 14

jazzactivist says...

Exactly, whitevanman2! There seem to be a huge number of people on here who are supportive of McDonalds. Heaven knows why, as cheap and nasty food and fizzy drinks have been linked to behavioural problems in children and young people.
Exactly, whitevanman2! There seem to be a huge number of people on here who are supportive of McDonalds. Heaven knows why, as cheap and nasty food and fizzy drinks have been linked to behavioural problems in children and young people. jazzactivist
  • Score: -9

7:50pm Mon 10 Mar 14

Kendal lad says...

jazzactivist wrote:
Exactly, whitevanman2! There seem to be a huge number of people on here who are supportive of McDonalds. Heaven knows why, as cheap and nasty food and fizzy drinks have been linked to behavioural problems in children and young people.
Come on jazzactivist. Yes there are issues with eating McD's food, but there are also issues eating just plates full of carrots. If that is all you eat you would also get ill.
Everything in moderation is the key.
The way that the modern food industry has promoted the use of cheaper and cheaper ingredients, and the addictive nature of those ingredients (and sugar is really bad for this) means that people get addicted to the flavours / textures etc of this food.
It is all about balance. If you have a chocolate croissant and a milky coffee for breakfast, a chocolate biscuit for 11.00's, McD's for lunch and pizza for dinner then of course you are going to keep topping up on your sugar intake so that you can keep feeding your craving.
There is nothing wrong with the occasional McD's, just as there is nothing wrong with the occasional biscuit, or chocolate cake or bag of doughnuts. However, these items should been seen as forming part of a healthy varied diet with plenty of exercise.
I for one had a fantastic McD's at midnight yesterday after having attended a party in Manchester as it was the only place open late on a Sunday night. I will not be rushing to get another tomorrow but equally I can't say I will never have another.
[quote][p][bold]jazzactivist[/bold] wrote: Exactly, whitevanman2! There seem to be a huge number of people on here who are supportive of McDonalds. Heaven knows why, as cheap and nasty food and fizzy drinks have been linked to behavioural problems in children and young people.[/p][/quote]Come on jazzactivist. Yes there are issues with eating McD's food, but there are also issues eating just plates full of carrots. If that is all you eat you would also get ill. Everything in moderation is the key. The way that the modern food industry has promoted the use of cheaper and cheaper ingredients, and the addictive nature of those ingredients (and sugar is really bad for this) means that people get addicted to the flavours / textures etc of this food. It is all about balance. If you have a chocolate croissant and a milky coffee for breakfast, a chocolate biscuit for 11.00's, McD's for lunch and pizza for dinner then of course you are going to keep topping up on your sugar intake so that you can keep feeding your craving. There is nothing wrong with the occasional McD's, just as there is nothing wrong with the occasional biscuit, or chocolate cake or bag of doughnuts. However, these items should been seen as forming part of a healthy varied diet with plenty of exercise. I for one had a fantastic McD's at midnight yesterday after having attended a party in Manchester as it was the only place open late on a Sunday night. I will not be rushing to get another tomorrow but equally I can't say I will never have another. Kendal lad
  • Score: 0

10:17am Tue 11 Mar 14

clare_thebear says...

hogheaven wrote:
Kendal lad wrote:
Whilst not condoning poor behaviour (we all must take responsibility for our own actions), what needs addressing is the issue of lack of reasonably priced activities and facilities for children and young adults in the Kendal area.
It may well be annoying that people hang around McD's, and some of that behaviour may well be poor:- Give them an alternative.
Look at what St Thomas's church offers on a Thursday night, a free to all youth group. Regularly gets 50-80 youths there, offers great facilities and all done on a free and voluntary basis.
Stop moaning about how badly behaved these youths are. Look at the world they are growing up in. No prospect of ever owning a home (certainly not in this area), massive youth unemployment (that this Government has failed to adequately tackle), and entry level jobs in this area poorly paid and hard to come by, terrible pressure within schools to achieve the highest results possible etc etc.
Is it any wonder they kick back? CCTV and the like is not the answer. We need to engage in these guys and offer them alternatives.
You are dealing with a old age related problem with bored teenagers but think back to your childhood, did you behave like these youths, no ,why because you respected your elders and the police.There is no excuse for bad behaviour.
I absolutely agree with this Hogheaven, I'm dreading the time my kids are old enough to be out by themselves, because there isn't anything for them to do! Its an issue that needs dealing with ASAP!
[quote][p][bold]hogheaven[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kendal lad[/bold] wrote: Whilst not condoning poor behaviour (we all must take responsibility for our own actions), what needs addressing is the issue of lack of reasonably priced activities and facilities for children and young adults in the Kendal area. It may well be annoying that people hang around McD's, and some of that behaviour may well be poor:- Give them an alternative. Look at what St Thomas's church offers on a Thursday night, a free to all youth group. Regularly gets 50-80 youths there, offers great facilities and all done on a free and voluntary basis. Stop moaning about how badly behaved these youths are. Look at the world they are growing up in. No prospect of ever owning a home (certainly not in this area), massive youth unemployment (that this Government has failed to adequately tackle), and entry level jobs in this area poorly paid and hard to come by, terrible pressure within schools to achieve the highest results possible etc etc. Is it any wonder they kick back? CCTV and the like is not the answer. We need to engage in these guys and offer them alternatives.[/p][/quote]You are dealing with a old age related problem with bored teenagers but think back to your childhood, did you behave like these youths, no ,why because you respected your elders and the police.There is no excuse for bad behaviour.[/p][/quote]I absolutely agree with this Hogheaven, I'm dreading the time my kids are old enough to be out by themselves, because there isn't anything for them to do! Its an issue that needs dealing with ASAP! clare_thebear
  • Score: 1

2:53pm Tue 11 Mar 14

PropMeUpWithTeabags says...

I prefer Burger King!
I prefer Burger King! PropMeUpWithTeabags
  • Score: 5

6:17pm Tue 11 Mar 14

Gingery says...

Nothing to do?Growing up in the 80s and 90s I was busy every evening, homework, 2 types of sports clubs, playing out or cycling on my bicycle, watching some TV, some very basic computer games. Siblings attended cubs/scouts/boys brigade. There is plenty to do - martial arts clubs, youth and activity clubs run by churches and other organisations. Current younger members of my family struggle to fit everything in and have to forgo and turn down activities There's always been people who don't want to get involved, they moan there's nothing to do and always will do.

Still no reason to intimidate passersby, however I like the idea of interacting with different groups.
Nothing to do?Growing up in the 80s and 90s I was busy every evening, homework, 2 types of sports clubs, playing out or cycling on my bicycle, watching some TV, some very basic computer games. Siblings attended cubs/scouts/boys brigade. There is plenty to do - martial arts clubs, youth and activity clubs run by churches and other organisations. Current younger members of my family struggle to fit everything in and have to forgo and turn down activities There's always been people who don't want to get involved, they moan there's nothing to do and always will do. Still no reason to intimidate passersby, however I like the idea of interacting with different groups. Gingery
  • Score: 0

8:45am Wed 12 Mar 14

Kendal lad says...

Gingery wrote:
Nothing to do?Growing up in the 80s and 90s I was busy every evening, homework, 2 types of sports clubs, playing out or cycling on my bicycle, watching some TV, some very basic computer games. Siblings attended cubs/scouts/boys brigade. There is plenty to do - martial arts clubs, youth and activity clubs run by churches and other organisations. Current younger members of my family struggle to fit everything in and have to forgo and turn down activities There's always been people who don't want to get involved, they moan there's nothing to do and always will do.

Still no reason to intimidate passersby, however I like the idea of interacting with different groups.
Gingery.
You have missed the whole point about this thread. Growing up in the 80s / 90s was very different to know, that is a whole generation ago - 30 years.
Now parents are so scared by what they see in the news about roaming gangs of child molesters, they don't let their children out to play.
The cubs/scouts etc can't attract adults to help as it is too onerous and expensive to get the CRB checks sorted and health and safety will not let you start a fire without 18 forms filled out and a risk assessment.
The youth clubs are all closed due to government cut backs.
The sporting clubs are too expensive in these straightened times.
Adults have to stop looking back with rose tinted glasses at how good it was 'in the old days'.
The 50's and 60's opened the Pandora's Box of the 'have it now' generation. Yes there were barriers that needed to be broken down in the 60's, but where we are today is a natural extension of the liberalism that occurred. It was fine to have flower power, free love and men could grow their hair long but beware what you wish for.
Go back my earlier posts. The circle of respect starts with you. Its about relationship and respect. The youth are just kicking back against what they see as an oppressive and none caring society. And lets face it, who can blame them? Little or no prospect or ever owning their home, few well paid jobs, no job for life, work until you are least 80......the list goes on.
Being cheeky and yobbish is the only thing they have control over, the only way they can gain respect from their peers and the outside world, and if the police turn up, they only way they get recognised.
[quote][p][bold]Gingery[/bold] wrote: Nothing to do?Growing up in the 80s and 90s I was busy every evening, homework, 2 types of sports clubs, playing out or cycling on my bicycle, watching some TV, some very basic computer games. Siblings attended cubs/scouts/boys brigade. There is plenty to do - martial arts clubs, youth and activity clubs run by churches and other organisations. Current younger members of my family struggle to fit everything in and have to forgo and turn down activities There's always been people who don't want to get involved, they moan there's nothing to do and always will do. Still no reason to intimidate passersby, however I like the idea of interacting with different groups.[/p][/quote]Gingery. You have missed the whole point about this thread. Growing up in the 80s / 90s was very different to know, that is a whole generation ago - 30 years. Now parents are so scared by what they see in the news about roaming gangs of child molesters, they don't let their children out to play. The cubs/scouts etc can't attract adults to help as it is too onerous and expensive to get the CRB checks sorted and health and safety will not let you start a fire without 18 forms filled out and a risk assessment. The youth clubs are all closed due to government cut backs. The sporting clubs are too expensive in these straightened times. Adults have to stop looking back with rose tinted glasses at how good it was 'in the old days'. The 50's and 60's opened the Pandora's Box of the 'have it now' generation. Yes there were barriers that needed to be broken down in the 60's, but where we are today is a natural extension of the liberalism that occurred. It was fine to have flower power, free love and men could grow their hair long but beware what you wish for. Go back my earlier posts. The circle of respect starts with you. Its about relationship and respect. The youth are just kicking back against what they see as an oppressive and none caring society. And lets face it, who can blame them? Little or no prospect or ever owning their home, few well paid jobs, no job for life, work until you are least 80......the list goes on. Being cheeky and yobbish is the only thing they have control over, the only way they can gain respect from their peers and the outside world, and if the police turn up, they only way they get recognised. Kendal lad
  • Score: 0

11:36am Thu 13 Mar 14

Kendal lad says...

To anyone who has been following this set of posts. If you needed anymore proof of why it is important to engage with young people and to understand that the pressures are now different, read this article:-

http://www.bbc.co.uk
/news/magazine-26543
095
To anyone who has been following this set of posts. If you needed anymore proof of why it is important to engage with young people and to understand that the pressures are now different, read this article:- http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/magazine-26543 095 Kendal lad
  • Score: 0

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