Market traders attending this year's Appleby Horse Fair warned against selling counterfeit goods

The Westmorland Gazette: Market traders attending this year's Appleby Horse Fair warned against selling counterfeit goods Market traders attending this year's Appleby Horse Fair warned against selling counterfeit goods

MARKET traders attending this year’s Appleby Horse Fair are being warned against selling counterfeit goods by Cumbria County Council’s Trading Standards team.

A spokesman for the team said that the sale of counterfeit goods has a direct economic effect on trade and the safety of consumers and visitors.

“The sale of counterfeit goods undermines the trade of legitimate businesses,” said Mike Smyth, Public Protection Manager at Cumbria County Council.

“We are encouraging the return of the traditional fair goods to Appleby Horse Fair and will offer advice to consumers on what to do if they think they have bought counterfeit goods.”

Counterfeit goods are “fake” goods, normally copies holding logos or brand names which are registered as trade marks.

Examples include:

* Designer labelled clothing

* Alcohol and tobacco

* Mobile phone chargers

* Perfumes and cosmetics

* Watches and jewellery

* CDs, DVDs and computer games.

Such goods are often of poor quality, unreliable and sometimes unsafe.

Mr Smyth said the sale of counterfeit goods may seem like a petty crime. However, such activity can be linked to organised crime and child exploitation in sweat shops in making such items.

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He added that sellers who are involved in selling, making, advertising, distributing fake goods which infringe a registered trade mark or breach copyright are committing an offence and could end up with a criminal conviction.

If you believe you have been sold counterfeit goods please contact the trading standards team in confidence or anonymously at: Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 08454 040506 or Crime Stoppers on 0800 555 111

Comments (2)

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12:59pm Wed 21 May 14

hogheaven says...

Well clamp down heavily on them fine them and confiscate their stocks might work.Trading standards should have a field day and traffic police please control the covered wagon trail on the A65 make them pull in and let the traffic pass . Every year they cause mile long tail backs ,I know I always get caught in one.
Well clamp down heavily on them fine them and confiscate their stocks might work.Trading standards should have a field day and traffic police please control the covered wagon trail on the A65 make them pull in and let the traffic pass . Every year they cause mile long tail backs ,I know I always get caught in one. hogheaven
  • Score: 4

11:10pm Thu 22 May 14

Bill Lloyd says...

In fact there is very little in the way of counterfeit goods at Appleby Fair, and Mike Smyth and Trading Standards acknowledge this. For the last few years the value of seized goods has fallen significantly, even though Trading Standards have been more vigilant, and they warn the dodgy traders off before they come. To quote from the official minutes of the meetings: "Advance notification of the arrangements will be given to persuade individuals that may otherwise come to the Fair seeking to sell counterfeit goods to desist in doing so and it was hoped that this would avoid the necessity for any major exercise to be carried out. " In other words, this publicity is used to warn off the scammers, and to stop them selling fake goods, but it does NOT mean that it is a major problem - it isn't.
In fact there is very little in the way of counterfeit goods at Appleby Fair, and Mike Smyth and Trading Standards acknowledge this. For the last few years the value of seized goods has fallen significantly, even though Trading Standards have been more vigilant, and they warn the dodgy traders off before they come. To quote from the official minutes of the meetings: "Advance notification of the arrangements will be given to persuade individuals that may otherwise come to the Fair seeking to sell counterfeit goods to desist in doing so and it was hoped that this would avoid the necessity for any major exercise to be carried out. " In other words, this publicity is used to warn off the scammers, and to stop them selling fake goods, but it does NOT mean that it is a major problem - it isn't. Bill Lloyd
  • Score: -2

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