Two rescued from the sands at Greenodd

Two rescued from the sands at Greenodd

Two rescued from the sands at Greenodd

First published in News
Last updated
The Westmorland Gazette: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

A man and a woman were rescued from the sands at Greenodd.

Ulverston Inshore Rescue were called into action at 5pm yesterday, September 1, and quickly mobilised an all terrain vehicle and a rapid response quad bike.

It is believed the couple, who were walking their dog, were nearly trapped by the oncoming tide.

Nobody was injured.

Bruce Chattaway, Station Commander at Ulverston Inshore Rescue, said: "We urge people to take care on the sands and be aware of the tide - it comes in very quickly."

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6:56pm Tue 2 Sep 14

CartmelWharf says...

Not only does the tide "come in quickly" on both the Kent and Leven, but due to the high and low points carved out and moulded by the many river channels and their tributaries, the seemingly safe dry sands can suddenly become sandbanks surrounded by fast flowing, turbulent currents of river and sea flowing over each other in opposite directions on the flowing or rising tide. The time of the published tide, which is regularly referred to by Ulverston Inshore Rescue and Bay Search and Rescue in stories relating to rescues, is the peak height time, and in reality the effects of a rising tide within the two narrowing estuaries can be observed at between 2.5 and 3 hours before the full height is reached.
Encouragement is regularly made after a rescue from the sands, for anyone venturing onto them to be aware of the high tide time - The Westmorland Gazette used to publish these - but nowhere, where there are major access points, are there published lists of times. There are only signs warning of the potential dangers and that tide times should be consulted. If the effort has been made to erect such signage, could the times for the full year be displayed, as in Northumberland at the access points to the Causeway from the mainland to Lindisfarne? I appreciate that there are further hazardous conditions that should also be avoided within the bay.
Not only does the tide "come in quickly" on both the Kent and Leven, but due to the high and low points carved out and moulded by the many river channels and their tributaries, the seemingly safe dry sands can suddenly become sandbanks surrounded by fast flowing, turbulent currents of river and sea flowing over each other in opposite directions on the flowing or rising tide. The time of the published tide, which is regularly referred to by Ulverston Inshore Rescue and Bay Search and Rescue in stories relating to rescues, is the peak height time, and in reality the effects of a rising tide within the two narrowing estuaries can be observed at between 2.5 and 3 hours before the full height is reached. Encouragement is regularly made after a rescue from the sands, for anyone venturing onto them to be aware of the high tide time - The Westmorland Gazette used to publish these - but nowhere, where there are major access points, are there published lists of times. There are only signs warning of the potential dangers and that tide times should be consulted. If the effort has been made to erect such signage, could the times for the full year be displayed, as in Northumberland at the access points to the Causeway from the mainland to Lindisfarne? I appreciate that there are further hazardous conditions that should also be avoided within the bay. CartmelWharf
  • Score: 5
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