Women strip down to bathe in milk in Kendal town centre

The Westmorland Gazette: Young farmer Catherine Park and friend Amy Harrison Young farmer Catherine Park and friend Amy Harrison

Two women stripped down to bikinis and submerged themselves in a bath of milk in Kendal town centre as part of a national dairy protest.

Catherine Park, 21, whose family run a dairy farm in Whinfell, and her friend Amy Harrison embarked on the stunt to highlight the financial plight of Britain’s milk producers.

Although price cuts due to come in on August 1 were rescinded by key processing firms, dairy farmers are continuing their campaign to establish long-term price stability for milk.

The bathtub was filled with 200 litres of milk at Kendal’s Bird Cage on Monday.

"My family have really struggled," said Ms Park, a Young Farmers’ Club member. "I wanted to do something to help raise awareness about the problem."

Windermere councillor Ben Berry, who organised the protest, said the 'general public were just as disgusted with supermarkets as the farmers'.

"I'm as unhappy as everyone else," said Coun Berry. "I think it's important for everyone to come out and show their support."

Dozens of farmers turned out for the protest, staging a small demonstration outside the Iceland store in Highgate.

Young farmer Chris Ladds, 19, said he would like to see supermarkets made to pay a fairer price.

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"Dairy farmers need to be paid more money for their work. It's unfair for the supermarkets to take all the profit."

Derek Lomax, Kendal-based group secretary at NFU, said: "When a pint of milk costs more than a pint of water that comes out of the ground then its ridiculous."

Cumbria county councillor for Lower Kentdale Roger Bingham said if payments by supermarkets did not change then the UK would be in danger of losing its dairy industry.

"If we had to lose our cattle then England's green and pleasant land would be at risk of peril," said Mr Bingham.

The protest group SOS Dairy met at Carlisle on Tuesday to seek a way of achieving long-term price stability for Cumbria’s dairy farms. It was addressed by DFU Dairy Board chairman Mansel Raymond and chief dairy advisor Robert Newbery.

Thousands of dairy farmers are currently paid around 3p a litre less than milk costs to produce.

Comments (28)

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7:20am Wed 8 Aug 12

Moonbase says...

Ever seen a poor farmer?
Ever seen a poor farmer? Moonbase

8:21am Wed 8 Aug 12

Cas220 says...

Moonbase wrote:
Ever seen a poor farmer?
Nope, have seen poor looking cows though.....what a waste of milk.
[quote][p][bold]Moonbase[/bold] wrote: Ever seen a poor farmer?[/p][/quote]Nope, have seen poor looking cows though.....what a waste of milk. Cas220

8:47am Wed 8 Aug 12

tictoc1 says...

You two need to open your eyes. It's not about "poor" farmers. These men and woman work 365 days of the week. In all weather conditions, at all hours of the day. I suggest to look into how much money they loose due to the milk prices! I'm sure you wouldn't appreciate your wages/pensions being cut if it had a knock on effect to yourselves. We should be supporting our local farmers.
You two need to open your eyes. It's not about "poor" farmers. These men and woman work 365 days of the week. In all weather conditions, at all hours of the day. I suggest to look into how much money they loose due to the milk prices! I'm sure you wouldn't appreciate your wages/pensions being cut if it had a knock on effect to yourselves. We should be supporting our local farmers. tictoc1

10:24am Wed 8 Aug 12

BillyBob86 says...

Agree with Moonbase! Despite prices, they still get a better income than most. Also aren't milk prices per litre up about 3p from a year ago? I know milk farmers that are building new buildings on there land. There are not many working families that could afford a big extension on their own houses.
Agree with Moonbase! Despite prices, they still get a better income than most. Also aren't milk prices per litre up about 3p from a year ago? I know milk farmers that are building new buildings on there land. There are not many working families that could afford a big extension on their own houses. BillyBob86

11:48am Wed 8 Aug 12

Ben Berry says...

Well id like to thank the girls for taking part and the many other young farmers that came along to help.

The Supermarkets have more power than they should and are forcing down price cuts to farmers that are unsustainable. The market isnt free because of the restraints on the contracts.

You will of course find farmers expanding their business, the only way farmers are staying in business is to get bigger and bigger, and to find ways to difersify because the only way they actually get a pay packet is through the single farm payment.

We are losing farmers left right and centre, but now its not just about supporting and keeping a rural economy but about food security. Do you really want to be buying French milk? Do you think its a good idea Costa Coffee are buying Belgian milk?

We only want a fair price for the milk. Is that too much?
Well id like to thank the girls for taking part and the many other young farmers that came along to help. The Supermarkets have more power than they should and are forcing down price cuts to farmers that are unsustainable. The market isnt free because of the restraints on the contracts. You will of course find farmers expanding their business, the only way farmers are staying in business is to get bigger and bigger, and to find ways to difersify because the only way they actually get a pay packet is through the single farm payment. We are losing farmers left right and centre, but now its not just about supporting and keeping a rural economy but about food security. Do you really want to be buying French milk? Do you think its a good idea Costa Coffee are buying Belgian milk? We only want a fair price for the milk. Is that too much? Ben Berry

12:02pm Wed 8 Aug 12

tictoc1 says...

BillyBob86 wrote:
Agree with Moonbase! Despite prices, they still get a better income than most. Also aren't milk prices per litre up about 3p from a year ago? I know milk farmers that are building new buildings on there land. There are not many working families that could afford a big extension on their own houses.
Milk farmers might be building new buildings, expanding etc. Have you ever thought it might be to improve existing facilities to come in line with regulations? And I agree, not many working families can afford extensions, but not many working families put in the hours and hard work of a "normal" farmer.
The cost of running a dairy farm is massive. There's the health and safety issues, which also cost.
I think Ben Berrys' statement has pretty much summed it up. All we are trying to gain, is a fair price.
[quote][p][bold]BillyBob86[/bold] wrote: Agree with Moonbase! Despite prices, they still get a better income than most. Also aren't milk prices per litre up about 3p from a year ago? I know milk farmers that are building new buildings on there land. There are not many working families that could afford a big extension on their own houses.[/p][/quote]Milk farmers might be building new buildings, expanding etc. Have you ever thought it might be to improve existing facilities to come in line with regulations? And I agree, not many working families can afford extensions, but not many working families put in the hours and hard work of a "normal" farmer. The cost of running a dairy farm is massive. There's the health and safety issues, which also cost. I think Ben Berrys' statement has pretty much summed it up. All we are trying to gain, is a fair price. tictoc1

12:32pm Wed 8 Aug 12

BillyBob86 says...

Don't get me wrong, I don't at all dispute that the "normal" farmer is extremely hard working. I do also appreciate the effort that it takes to run a farm. I also agreed that they want a fair price for the milk. However I don't agreed with making out that the farms are running at a total loss. Where as I understand it, they run with an overall healthy net farm profit and it is only there income being reduce. Correct me if I'm wrong on this.
Don't get me wrong, I don't at all dispute that the "normal" farmer is extremely hard working. I do also appreciate the effort that it takes to run a farm. I also agreed that they want a fair price for the milk. However I don't agreed with making out that the farms are running at a total loss. Where as I understand it, they run with an overall healthy net farm profit and it is only there income being reduce. Correct me if I'm wrong on this. BillyBob86

1:00pm Wed 8 Aug 12

tictoc1 says...

I few years ago there was a similar issue with milk prices. Because of this, a farmer near Endmoor lost over £20k (per year). As a result, that farm is no longer a dairy farm and they've had to seek other ways of making a living. That farm wasn't overly big either. Alot of farms don't make a healthy profit! And a drop in prices wouldn't just affect their income.
I few years ago there was a similar issue with milk prices. Because of this, a farmer near Endmoor lost over £20k (per year). As a result, that farm is no longer a dairy farm and they've had to seek other ways of making a living. That farm wasn't overly big either. Alot of farms don't make a healthy profit! And a drop in prices wouldn't just affect their income. tictoc1

1:07pm Wed 8 Aug 12

onelocal says...

Ben Berry wrote:
Well id like to thank the girls for taking part and the many other young farmers that came along to help.

The Supermarkets have more power than they should and are forcing down price cuts to farmers that are unsustainable. The market isnt free because of the restraints on the contracts.

You will of course find farmers expanding their business, the only way farmers are staying in business is to get bigger and bigger, and to find ways to difersify because the only way they actually get a pay packet is through the single farm payment.

We are losing farmers left right and centre, but now its not just about supporting and keeping a rural economy but about food security. Do you really want to be buying French milk? Do you think its a good idea Costa Coffee are buying Belgian milk?

We only want a fair price for the milk. Is that too much?
Positioning the milk price issue as a straight battle between farmers and supermarkets over simplifies what is a complex issue. There are also dairies or processors involved as well. The processor was able to profit from the resale of cream which is a by-product of milk processing. The price that the processor gets for his cream has dropped by over 40% over the last 12 months (down from £1800 per tonne to £1020). He has to make that loss up some way.
Probably the easiest way to address this is to put up the price of milk to the consumer, but I'm sure Joe Public, or the voter, will then start to squeal. Now we don't want that do we Ben?
[quote][p][bold]Ben Berry[/bold] wrote: Well id like to thank the girls for taking part and the many other young farmers that came along to help. The Supermarkets have more power than they should and are forcing down price cuts to farmers that are unsustainable. The market isnt free because of the restraints on the contracts. You will of course find farmers expanding their business, the only way farmers are staying in business is to get bigger and bigger, and to find ways to difersify because the only way they actually get a pay packet is through the single farm payment. We are losing farmers left right and centre, but now its not just about supporting and keeping a rural economy but about food security. Do you really want to be buying French milk? Do you think its a good idea Costa Coffee are buying Belgian milk? We only want a fair price for the milk. Is that too much?[/p][/quote]Positioning the milk price issue as a straight battle between farmers and supermarkets over simplifies what is a complex issue. There are also dairies or processors involved as well. The processor was able to profit from the resale of cream which is a by-product of milk processing. The price that the processor gets for his cream has dropped by over 40% over the last 12 months (down from £1800 per tonne to £1020). He has to make that loss up some way. Probably the easiest way to address this is to put up the price of milk to the consumer, but I'm sure Joe Public, or the voter, will then start to squeal. Now we don't want that do we Ben? onelocal

1:09pm Wed 8 Aug 12

Ben Berry says...

BillyBob86 wrote:
Don't get me wrong, I don't at all dispute that the "normal" farmer is extremely hard working. I do also appreciate the effort that it takes to run a farm. I also agreed that they want a fair price for the milk. However I don't agreed with making out that the farms are running at a total loss. Where as I understand it, they run with an overall healthy net farm profit and it is only there income being reduce. Correct me if I'm wrong on this.
It depends what else is on the farm. But depending on who they sell to, the price given for the milk at the farmgate is less than the cost of production. The cost of production according to Tesco and Sainsbury's is around 30p a litre. Many are being paid 24-28p a litre and being held above by subsidy/diversificat
ion.

Its wholly unsustaible to be paying these prices for milk because more and more farmers will give up dairy. To give you a figure there has been a 35% reduction in Dairy farms in Cumbria in the last 10 years with 33,000 less dairy cows in the UK than there was last year alone.

I dont want us to get to the situation where noone does dairy because they have been priced out of the market.
[quote][p][bold]BillyBob86[/bold] wrote: Don't get me wrong, I don't at all dispute that the "normal" farmer is extremely hard working. I do also appreciate the effort that it takes to run a farm. I also agreed that they want a fair price for the milk. However I don't agreed with making out that the farms are running at a total loss. Where as I understand it, they run with an overall healthy net farm profit and it is only there income being reduce. Correct me if I'm wrong on this.[/p][/quote]It depends what else is on the farm. But depending on who they sell to, the price given for the milk at the farmgate is less than the cost of production. The cost of production according to Tesco and Sainsbury's is around 30p a litre. Many are being paid 24-28p a litre and being held above by subsidy/diversificat ion. Its wholly unsustaible to be paying these prices for milk because more and more farmers will give up dairy. To give you a figure there has been a 35% reduction in Dairy farms in Cumbria in the last 10 years with 33,000 less dairy cows in the UK than there was last year alone. I dont want us to get to the situation where noone does dairy because they have been priced out of the market. Ben Berry

1:15pm Wed 8 Aug 12

Ben Berry says...

onelocal wrote:
Ben Berry wrote: Well id like to thank the girls for taking part and the many other young farmers that came along to help. The Supermarkets have more power than they should and are forcing down price cuts to farmers that are unsustainable. The market isnt free because of the restraints on the contracts. You will of course find farmers expanding their business, the only way farmers are staying in business is to get bigger and bigger, and to find ways to difersify because the only way they actually get a pay packet is through the single farm payment. We are losing farmers left right and centre, but now its not just about supporting and keeping a rural economy but about food security. Do you really want to be buying French milk? Do you think its a good idea Costa Coffee are buying Belgian milk? We only want a fair price for the milk. Is that too much?
Positioning the milk price issue as a straight battle between farmers and supermarkets over simplifies what is a complex issue. There are also dairies or processors involved as well. The processor was able to profit from the resale of cream which is a by-product of milk processing. The price that the processor gets for his cream has dropped by over 40% over the last 12 months (down from £1800 per tonne to £1020). He has to make that loss up some way. Probably the easiest way to address this is to put up the price of milk to the consumer, but I'm sure Joe Public, or the voter, will then start to squeal. Now we don't want that do we Ben?
It is the view of many that we wouldnt have to see a price rise on the shelf for farmers to get a fairer share. Supermarkets have used their contracts with processors and producers to suck up all the margins that everyone else used to enjoy.

As an example, does the milk make you squeal at Tesco or Sainsbury's? They manage to pay a fair price?!

But even if it got to that point I think the average consumer would be happy to pay 5p more a litre if they knew it was going to the farmer instead of the supermarket.
[quote][p][bold]onelocal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ben Berry[/bold] wrote: Well id like to thank the girls for taking part and the many other young farmers that came along to help. The Supermarkets have more power than they should and are forcing down price cuts to farmers that are unsustainable. The market isnt free because of the restraints on the contracts. You will of course find farmers expanding their business, the only way farmers are staying in business is to get bigger and bigger, and to find ways to difersify because the only way they actually get a pay packet is through the single farm payment. We are losing farmers left right and centre, but now its not just about supporting and keeping a rural economy but about food security. Do you really want to be buying French milk? Do you think its a good idea Costa Coffee are buying Belgian milk? We only want a fair price for the milk. Is that too much?[/p][/quote]Positioning the milk price issue as a straight battle between farmers and supermarkets over simplifies what is a complex issue. There are also dairies or processors involved as well. The processor was able to profit from the resale of cream which is a by-product of milk processing. The price that the processor gets for his cream has dropped by over 40% over the last 12 months (down from £1800 per tonne to £1020). He has to make that loss up some way. Probably the easiest way to address this is to put up the price of milk to the consumer, but I'm sure Joe Public, or the voter, will then start to squeal. Now we don't want that do we Ben?[/p][/quote]It is the view of many that we wouldnt have to see a price rise on the shelf for farmers to get a fairer share. Supermarkets have used their contracts with processors and producers to suck up all the margins that everyone else used to enjoy. As an example, does the milk make you squeal at Tesco or Sainsbury's? They manage to pay a fair price?! But even if it got to that point I think the average consumer would be happy to pay 5p more a litre if they knew it was going to the farmer instead of the supermarket. Ben Berry

2:29pm Wed 8 Aug 12

Kendmoor says...

I am completely on Ben Berrys side here
though I think a key thing also to highlight a point

"But even if it got to that point I think the average consumer would be happy to pay 5p more a litre if they knew it was going to the farmer instead of the supermarket"

this is a big key thing, and comes down to trust, and nobody trusts the supermarkets.
I am completely on Ben Berrys side here though I think a key thing also to highlight a point "But even if it got to that point I think the average consumer would be happy to pay 5p more a litre if they knew it was going to the farmer instead of the supermarket" this is a big key thing, and comes down to trust, and nobody trusts the supermarkets. Kendmoor

2:30pm Wed 8 Aug 12

Kendmoor says...

Personally I would be happy to buy direct from the farm and cut out the supermarkets completely, along with my salad and veg.
Personally I would be happy to buy direct from the farm and cut out the supermarkets completely, along with my salad and veg. Kendmoor

10:51pm Wed 8 Aug 12

Cas220 says...

In 2007 the supermarkets and dairies tried to give farmers a fair price; the OFT didn't like it.
http://www.telegraph
.co.uk/news/uknews/1
563663/UK-supermarke
ts-fixed-milk-and-ch
eese-prices.html
And yes, I did work for one of the parties involved.
If you are in a job and have your pay cut then you generally look for another job. There are simply too many dairy farmers in this country and the fact that you could waste all of the milk involved in this stunt just proves there is enough to throw away!
We were treated like criminals in 2007 when we tried to do the best for farmers - the memory is hard to forget.
In 2007 the supermarkets and dairies tried to give farmers a fair price; the OFT didn't like it. http://www.telegraph .co.uk/news/uknews/1 563663/UK-supermarke ts-fixed-milk-and-ch eese-prices.html And yes, I did work for one of the parties involved. If you are in a job and have your pay cut then you generally look for another job. There are simply too many dairy farmers in this country and the fact that you could waste all of the milk involved in this stunt just proves there is enough to throw away! We were treated like criminals in 2007 when we tried to do the best for farmers - the memory is hard to forget. Cas220

10:54pm Wed 8 Aug 12

Cas220 says...

Kendmoor wrote:
I am completely on Ben Berrys side here
though I think a key thing also to highlight a point

"But even if it got to that point I think the average consumer would be happy to pay 5p more a litre if they knew it was going to the farmer instead of the supermarket"

this is a big key thing, and comes down to trust, and nobody trusts the supermarkets.
I trust the supermarkets.
I can't get local produce in Sedbergh - the meat comes from the North East and the salad comes from Spain. In ASDA I can buy meat and veg from Cumbria and Yorkshire.
Contrary to what you might think consumers want to pay less for milk than they pay now - the fact that ALDI and Poundland now sell milk is proof of this - and why is no-one jumping on them for selling cheap milk??!!
[quote][p][bold]Kendmoor[/bold] wrote: I am completely on Ben Berrys side here though I think a key thing also to highlight a point "But even if it got to that point I think the average consumer would be happy to pay 5p more a litre if they knew it was going to the farmer instead of the supermarket" this is a big key thing, and comes down to trust, and nobody trusts the supermarkets.[/p][/quote]I trust the supermarkets. I can't get local produce in Sedbergh - the meat comes from the North East and the salad comes from Spain. In ASDA I can buy meat and veg from Cumbria and Yorkshire. Contrary to what you might think consumers want to pay less for milk than they pay now - the fact that ALDI and Poundland now sell milk is proof of this - and why is no-one jumping on them for selling cheap milk??!! Cas220

8:37am Thu 9 Aug 12

tictoc1 says...

Not ALL consumers want to pay less for milk than they do now! The "stunt" was to highlight the problem, which it is doing! And personally, I would pay over the odds to keep Britain farming! Nice to see where your loyalties lie!
Not ALL consumers want to pay less for milk than they do now! The "stunt" was to highlight the problem, which it is doing! And personally, I would pay over the odds to keep Britain farming! Nice to see where your loyalties lie! tictoc1

8:50am Thu 9 Aug 12

BillyBob86 says...

At least these comments highlight another problem and may raise a point that should be considered. It has been said that to keep profits higher then some farms are getting bigger and bigger. This causes two problem, firstly if the farm is running at a loss, then making the farm larger surely only increases that loss. Also maybe farms that get bigger only serve to flood the market with a greater quantity of milk than is required, therefore reducing milk prices, and in turn forcing those farmers, that don't have the savings avaliable to expand, out of the farming industry. Maybe this could suggest the dip in dairy farmers. However, all I can say in response to point such as the Endmoor farmer losing 20k a year, is that, any small family run business would only survive a couple of months doing this, as the majority wouldn't have savings to fall back on. At least farmers have this, and it shows dairy farmers have had good recent times to be able to aquire this size of savings.
At least these comments highlight another problem and may raise a point that should be considered. It has been said that to keep profits higher then some farms are getting bigger and bigger. This causes two problem, firstly if the farm is running at a loss, then making the farm larger surely only increases that loss. Also maybe farms that get bigger only serve to flood the market with a greater quantity of milk than is required, therefore reducing milk prices, and in turn forcing those farmers, that don't have the savings avaliable to expand, out of the farming industry. Maybe this could suggest the dip in dairy farmers. However, all I can say in response to point such as the Endmoor farmer losing 20k a year, is that, any small family run business would only survive a couple of months doing this, as the majority wouldn't have savings to fall back on. At least farmers have this, and it shows dairy farmers have had good recent times to be able to aquire this size of savings. BillyBob86

9:24am Thu 9 Aug 12

Ladyxxmacbeth says...

maybe they just wanted to look younger! ...sorry that's **** milk, maybe we should start drinking different milks? then you could have a artisan milk shop which sells everything from Gerbil milk to pig milk. I believe gerbil milk is like the expresso of milk. Personally I think it weird we drink milk frm a different species, and should pay much more, and waste less. but would we be prepared to pay more for cheese? im rambling ill shut up.....
maybe they just wanted to look younger! ...sorry that's **** milk, maybe we should start drinking different milks? then you could have a artisan milk shop which sells everything from Gerbil milk to pig milk. I believe gerbil milk is like the expresso of milk. Personally I think it weird we drink milk frm a different species, and should pay much more, and waste less. but would we be prepared to pay more for cheese? im rambling ill shut up..... Ladyxxmacbeth

10:38am Thu 9 Aug 12

tictoc1 says...

BillyBob86 wrote:
At least these comments highlight another problem and may raise a point that should be considered. It has been said that to keep profits higher then some farms are getting bigger and bigger. This causes two problem, firstly if the farm is running at a loss, then making the farm larger surely only increases that loss. Also maybe farms that get bigger only serve to flood the market with a greater quantity of milk than is required, therefore reducing milk prices, and in turn forcing those farmers, that don't have the savings avaliable to expand, out of the farming industry. Maybe this could suggest the dip in dairy farmers. However, all I can say in response to point such as the Endmoor farmer losing 20k a year, is that, any small family run business would only survive a couple of months doing this, as the majority wouldn't have savings to fall back on. At least farmers have this, and it shows dairy farmers have had good recent times to be able to aquire this size of savings.
You think this farm had savings??
If a farm is run by a father and son doesn't that class as a "small family run business"? I really am speechless by how one sided you're coming across.
Ladyxxmacbeth - I just want to say, I love your little statements :-) and keep rambling, you throw some humor in where it's needed.
[quote][p][bold]BillyBob86[/bold] wrote: At least these comments highlight another problem and may raise a point that should be considered. It has been said that to keep profits higher then some farms are getting bigger and bigger. This causes two problem, firstly if the farm is running at a loss, then making the farm larger surely only increases that loss. Also maybe farms that get bigger only serve to flood the market with a greater quantity of milk than is required, therefore reducing milk prices, and in turn forcing those farmers, that don't have the savings avaliable to expand, out of the farming industry. Maybe this could suggest the dip in dairy farmers. However, all I can say in response to point such as the Endmoor farmer losing 20k a year, is that, any small family run business would only survive a couple of months doing this, as the majority wouldn't have savings to fall back on. At least farmers have this, and it shows dairy farmers have had good recent times to be able to aquire this size of savings.[/p][/quote]You think this farm had savings?? If a farm is run by a father and son doesn't that class as a "small family run business"? I really am speechless by how one sided you're coming across. Ladyxxmacbeth - I just want to say, I love your little statements :-) and keep rambling, you throw some humor in where it's needed. tictoc1

11:00am Thu 9 Aug 12

BillyBob86 says...

I'm far from one sided, as you will see from previous posts regarding how much I apprieciate the effort and time farmers put in. However I am looking at the overall view. I do see a father and son run farm as a small family business, that is why I used this as an example. Yes it is fair for farmers to seek a fair price, as it would be fair for me to seek a fair pay for the work I do. You say they lost 20k a year, but my arguement is that any other small family run (none farm) business wouldn't even of survived a year at that rate, I assume this farm lasted longer, at this loss, than a year for you to be able to quote 20k a year, and some farms even being able to finance expansion. Dairy farms, like any business in the UK, have ups and downs and prices are up on last year, with the most recent cuts to milk prices suspended.
I'm far from one sided, as you will see from previous posts regarding how much I apprieciate the effort and time farmers put in. However I am looking at the overall view. I do see a father and son run farm as a small family business, that is why I used this as an example. Yes it is fair for farmers to seek a fair price, as it would be fair for me to seek a fair pay for the work I do. You say they lost 20k a year, but my arguement is that any other small family run (none farm) business wouldn't even of survived a year at that rate, I assume this farm lasted longer, at this loss, than a year for you to be able to quote 20k a year, and some farms even being able to finance expansion. Dairy farms, like any business in the UK, have ups and downs and prices are up on last year, with the most recent cuts to milk prices suspended. BillyBob86

12:41pm Thu 9 Aug 12

Kendmoor says...

Cas220 wrote:
Kendmoor wrote:
I am completely on Ben Berrys side here
though I think a key thing also to highlight a point

"But even if it got to that point I think the average consumer would be happy to pay 5p more a litre if they knew it was going to the farmer instead of the supermarket"

this is a big key thing, and comes down to trust, and nobody trusts the supermarkets.
I trust the supermarkets.
I can't get local produce in Sedbergh - the meat comes from the North East and the salad comes from Spain. In ASDA I can buy meat and veg from Cumbria and Yorkshire.
Contrary to what you might think consumers want to pay less for milk than they pay now - the fact that ALDI and Poundland now sell milk is proof of this - and why is no-one jumping on them for selling cheap milk??!!
trust them to do what exactly? I wouldn't make it a habit to trust big business, they're only in it for the money.
[quote][p][bold]Cas220[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kendmoor[/bold] wrote: I am completely on Ben Berrys side here though I think a key thing also to highlight a point "But even if it got to that point I think the average consumer would be happy to pay 5p more a litre if they knew it was going to the farmer instead of the supermarket" this is a big key thing, and comes down to trust, and nobody trusts the supermarkets.[/p][/quote]I trust the supermarkets. I can't get local produce in Sedbergh - the meat comes from the North East and the salad comes from Spain. In ASDA I can buy meat and veg from Cumbria and Yorkshire. Contrary to what you might think consumers want to pay less for milk than they pay now - the fact that ALDI and Poundland now sell milk is proof of this - and why is no-one jumping on them for selling cheap milk??!![/p][/quote]trust them to do what exactly? I wouldn't make it a habit to trust big business, they're only in it for the money. Kendmoor

2:19pm Thu 9 Aug 12

onelocal says...

Kendmoor wrote:
Cas220 wrote:
Kendmoor wrote:
I am completely on Ben Berrys side here
though I think a key thing also to highlight a point

"But even if it got to that point I think the average consumer would be happy to pay 5p more a litre if they knew it was going to the farmer instead of the supermarket"

this is a big key thing, and comes down to trust, and nobody trusts the supermarkets.
I trust the supermarkets.
I can't get local produce in Sedbergh - the meat comes from the North East and the salad comes from Spain. In ASDA I can buy meat and veg from Cumbria and Yorkshire.
Contrary to what you might think consumers want to pay less for milk than they pay now - the fact that ALDI and Poundland now sell milk is proof of this - and why is no-one jumping on them for selling cheap milk??!!
trust them to do what exactly? I wouldn't make it a habit to trust big business, they're only in it for the money.
Sounds like you don't trust anybody. Couple of daft comments "Nobody trusts the supermarkets". Why do so many people shop at supermarkets, week in, week out if they don't trust them. If it wasn't for the supermarkets we wouldn't have ready supplies of fresh food at a reasonable, and in some cases low cost. Don't think the corner shop alone, could handle such volumes these days.
"I wouldnt make it a habit to trust big business, they are only in it for the money". What on earth do you think any business, big or small, is in it for. Those that don't make money don't survive, and we've seen a few of those lately. I'd rather trust big business that's making money and employing me than a business that's not making money and laying me off.
[quote][p][bold]Kendmoor[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Cas220[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kendmoor[/bold] wrote: I am completely on Ben Berrys side here though I think a key thing also to highlight a point "But even if it got to that point I think the average consumer would be happy to pay 5p more a litre if they knew it was going to the farmer instead of the supermarket" this is a big key thing, and comes down to trust, and nobody trusts the supermarkets.[/p][/quote]I trust the supermarkets. I can't get local produce in Sedbergh - the meat comes from the North East and the salad comes from Spain. In ASDA I can buy meat and veg from Cumbria and Yorkshire. Contrary to what you might think consumers want to pay less for milk than they pay now - the fact that ALDI and Poundland now sell milk is proof of this - and why is no-one jumping on them for selling cheap milk??!![/p][/quote]trust them to do what exactly? I wouldn't make it a habit to trust big business, they're only in it for the money.[/p][/quote]Sounds like you don't trust anybody. Couple of daft comments "Nobody trusts the supermarkets". Why do so many people shop at supermarkets, week in, week out if they don't trust them. If it wasn't for the supermarkets we wouldn't have ready supplies of fresh food at a reasonable, and in some cases low cost. Don't think the corner shop alone, could handle such volumes these days. "I wouldnt make it a habit to trust big business, they are only in it for the money". What on earth do you think any business, big or small, is in it for. Those that don't make money don't survive, and we've seen a few of those lately. I'd rather trust big business that's making money and employing me than a business that's not making money and laying me off. onelocal

3:00pm Thu 9 Aug 12

Kendmoor says...

I don't trust what you're saying at all Onelocal
I don't trust what you're saying at all Onelocal Kendmoor

4:11pm Thu 9 Aug 12

Kendmoor says...

amusing myself aside, you read way too much into what I said and are milking it for new conversational points that I wasn't even making. udderly ridiculous.
amusing myself aside, you read way too much into what I said and are milking it for new conversational points that I wasn't even making. udderly ridiculous. Kendmoor

11:46pm Thu 9 Aug 12

wezzyk says...

I would happily go back to my milk being delivered to the door each morning and recycling the bottles and pay a little more if needed. But how much more expensive is it to buy milk in a glass bottle? I notice even the milk men / women working around town now deliver the plastic bottles you buy from Asda, Morrisons, Tesco etc
I would happily go back to my milk being delivered to the door each morning and recycling the bottles and pay a little more if needed. But how much more expensive is it to buy milk in a glass bottle? I notice even the milk men / women working around town now deliver the plastic bottles you buy from Asda, Morrisons, Tesco etc wezzyk

12:15am Fri 10 Aug 12

Ladyxxmacbeth says...

nah I get my milk deliver in glass bottles nd it costs me 52p a pint, if you are in kendal you should look up hilary and janet atkinson they are the milk man and lady nd very good they are too.
nah I get my milk deliver in glass bottles nd it costs me 52p a pint, if you are in kendal you should look up hilary and janet atkinson they are the milk man and lady nd very good they are too. Ladyxxmacbeth

5:05am Fri 10 Aug 12

taigum says...

Moonbase wrote:
Ever seen a poor farmer?
mrs just crossed you off christmas list!! you've set her off now!
[quote][p][bold]Moonbase[/bold] wrote: Ever seen a poor farmer?[/p][/quote]mrs just crossed you off christmas list!! you've set her off now! taigum

8:59pm Fri 10 Aug 12

Moonbase says...

taigum wrote:
Moonbase wrote:
Ever seen a poor farmer?
mrs just crossed you off christmas list!! you've set her off now!
Got the topic started.......lol
[quote][p][bold]taigum[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Moonbase[/bold] wrote: Ever seen a poor farmer?[/p][/quote]mrs just crossed you off christmas list!! you've set her off now![/p][/quote]Got the topic started.......lol Moonbase

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