CHRISTIAN VIEWPOINT: The promise is the same

Do you, like me, sometimes look at someone who has a close relationship with God and say, “Oh I wish I had your faith”?

There seems to be serenity about them and they seem so content whereas I worry about how I stand with God.

I want to believe, I want to pray and know that someone is listening, and I want to know that my life will be all right. But somehow things get so busy, I am so distracted, that God seems far away.

But comparing ourselves to those with a strong faith is missing the point.

For instance, in my wallet are two £5 notes. One is pristine and looks as though it were printed yesterday, and the other is creased, torn and grubby.

If I look carefully, though, each of them bears a promise from the Bank of England to pay me the sum of five pounds on demand. No matter the state of the bank note, the promise is the same.

Faith is a God given gift and when we have it, it doesn’t matter the state or our lives – pristine or tatty it connects us with God.

A man, desperate for his son’s health, begged Jesus for help. Jesus told him: “Everything is possible for him who believes.”

The man said, “Lord, I believe. Help my disbelief!” His son was healed.

Have you asked God for the gift of faith today?

John Thompson

Reader, United Benefice of Staveley, Kentmere and Ings

Comments (1)

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8:28pm Wed 9 Jul 14

kendal brat says...

John,

It was Martin Luther who declared "Here I am, I can do no other"
He recognised that his capacity for belief and faith was a product of his nature and nurture, ie all the influences that formed his persona.

There was nothing within him at that time that was capable of making him change his views, and he seemed to recognise that we can only change our views if some strong external influence causes us to realise that the 'other way' is in our best, or least worst, interest.

If you took time to understand the illusory nature of conscious free will, you would recognise that our belief and faith is beyond our personal conscious control. This means that whether you are capable of being a Christian is down to the way different influences impact on your subconscious.
You have no more control over being a Christian than I have. This fact should make you question your faith more than anything else.

If you want to be a Christian, it pays not to think too hard, or to listen too hard to reason. ;)
John, It was Martin Luther who declared "Here I am, I can do no other" He recognised that his capacity for belief and faith was a product of his nature and nurture, ie all the influences that formed his persona. There was nothing within him at that time that was capable of making him change his views, and he seemed to recognise that we can only change our views if some strong external influence causes us to realise that the 'other way' is in our best, or least worst, interest. If you took time to understand the illusory nature of conscious free will, you would recognise that our belief and faith is beyond our personal conscious control. This means that whether you are capable of being a Christian is down to the way different influences impact on your subconscious. You have no more control over being a Christian than I have. This fact should make you question your faith more than anything else. If you want to be a Christian, it pays not to think too hard, or to listen too hard to reason. ;) kendal brat
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