BBC Radio Cumbria staff in walkout against compulsory redundancies plan

The Westmorland Gazette: Members of BBC Radio Cumbria's NUJ branch on strike today where they were joined by Cumbria County Councillor Tony Markley (front left) Members of BBC Radio Cumbria's NUJ branch on strike today where they were joined by Cumbria County Councillor Tony Markley (front left)

BBC Radio Cumbria staff are striking today in support of nationwide industrial action against proposed compulsory redundancies.

Union members gathered on the picketline outside Radio Cumbria headquarters in Annetwell Street, Carlisle, this morning.

A spokeswoman said around 20 members of the BBC Cumbria branch of the National Union of Journalists (NUJ), are taking part in the 24-hour walkout which began at midnight this morning.

They are supporting other chapels against proposed job losses planned for BBC Scotland, BBC World Service, Radio Five Live and the Asian Network, which are being fought by NUJ chapels at BBC stations around the country.

The Cumbria branch believes they can be avoided through the redeployment of staff from other parts of the corporation.

Julie Clayton, of the BBC Cumbria NUJ chapel, said the county station had lost around six or seven members of staff itself over the past six to eight months.

She said: "We know many organisations have gone through a period of cuts and BBC Radio Cumbria isn't any different. But we think it shouldn't be affecting the people on the ground doing their job. If you continue to lose experience, it will affect the quality of programming."

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Most of Radio Cumbria's news and programming team were said to be supporting the action and that there had been less local news broadcast in its bulletins as a consequence.

However, some show presenters have not joined the action because they are not trained journalists or NUJ members, she explained.

"The last thing we want to do is have an impact on services for the licence-paying public but we want to ensure we maintain the quality of service," added Ms Clayton.

In a statement from its Manchester press office, the BBC said: "We are disappointed that the NUJ has gone ahead with today's strike and apologise to our audience for the disruption to services.

"Unfortunately industrial action does not alter the fact that the BBC has significant savings targets and as a consequence may have to make a number of compulsory redundancies.

"We have made considerable progress in reducing the need for compulsory redundancies through volunteers, redeployment and cancelling vacant positions and we will continue with these efforts."

Comments (12)

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12:03pm Mon 18 Feb 13

Helvellyn55 says...

These are simply over paid, under worked people trying to preserve a way of life - they have no interest whatever in "quality of service" - they would not work in local radio if that were true.

They should consider themselves lucky that the BBC Trust was foolish enough to refuse to cut local radio back when it was proposed last year.
These are simply over paid, under worked people trying to preserve a way of life - they have no interest whatever in "quality of service" - they would not work in local radio if that were true. They should consider themselves lucky that the BBC Trust was foolish enough to refuse to cut local radio back when it was proposed last year. Helvellyn55

1:28pm Mon 18 Feb 13

oceancloud says...

What evidence do you have of all those mostly insensitive comments about a group of people who are trying to save their jobs. Shame on you!
What evidence do you have of all those mostly insensitive comments about a group of people who are trying to save their jobs. Shame on you! oceancloud

2:26pm Mon 18 Feb 13

Kendal Jock says...

Helvellyn55 wrote:
These are simply over paid, under worked people trying to preserve a way of life - they have no interest whatever in "quality of service" - they would not work in local radio if that were true.

They should consider themselves lucky that the BBC Trust was foolish enough to refuse to cut local radio back when it was proposed last year.
Presumably like most public servants, they think they're above the private sector. Try a proper job! no index linked
pension, or lots of 'sickie days' off and big money for little else than showing up.
[quote][p][bold]Helvellyn55[/bold] wrote: These are simply over paid, under worked people trying to preserve a way of life - they have no interest whatever in "quality of service" - they would not work in local radio if that were true. They should consider themselves lucky that the BBC Trust was foolish enough to refuse to cut local radio back when it was proposed last year.[/p][/quote]Presumably like most public servants, they think they're above the private sector. Try a proper job! no index linked pension, or lots of 'sickie days' off and big money for little else than showing up. Kendal Jock

5:38pm Mon 18 Feb 13

Helvellyn55 says...

oceancloud wrote:
What evidence do you have of all those mostly insensitive comments about a group of people who are trying to save their jobs. Shame on you!
Inside knowledge
[quote][p][bold]oceancloud[/bold] wrote: What evidence do you have of all those mostly insensitive comments about a group of people who are trying to save their jobs. Shame on you![/p][/quote]Inside knowledge Helvellyn55

11:29pm Mon 18 Feb 13

life cycle too says...

Helvellyn55 wrote:
These are simply over paid, under worked people trying to preserve a way of life - they have no interest whatever in "quality of service" - they would not work in local radio if that were true.

They should consider themselves lucky that the BBC Trust was foolish enough to refuse to cut local radio back when it was proposed last year.
Evenings on Radio Cumbria feature a nation wide Radio 2 style chat with music program hosted by Mark Forest - a presenter in Berkshire - except for the football on Tuesday nights.

LOCAL radio? I don't think so - it's just the thin end of the wedge!
[quote][p][bold]Helvellyn55[/bold] wrote: These are simply over paid, under worked people trying to preserve a way of life - they have no interest whatever in "quality of service" - they would not work in local radio if that were true. They should consider themselves lucky that the BBC Trust was foolish enough to refuse to cut local radio back when it was proposed last year.[/p][/quote]Evenings on Radio Cumbria feature a nation wide Radio 2 style chat with music program hosted by Mark Forest - a presenter in Berkshire - except for the football on Tuesday nights. LOCAL radio? I don't think so - it's just the thin end of the wedge! life cycle too

9:21am Tue 19 Feb 13

Helvellyn55 says...

life cycle too wrote:
Helvellyn55 wrote: These are simply over paid, under worked people trying to preserve a way of life - they have no interest whatever in "quality of service" - they would not work in local radio if that were true. They should consider themselves lucky that the BBC Trust was foolish enough to refuse to cut local radio back when it was proposed last year.
Evenings on Radio Cumbria feature a nation wide Radio 2 style chat with music program hosted by Mark Forest - a presenter in Berkshire - except for the football on Tuesday nights. LOCAL radio? I don't think so - it's just the thin end of the wedge!
It/they really should be closed to save the Licence Fee payer the cost and the oney saved used for better purposes.
[quote][p][bold]life cycle too[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Helvellyn55[/bold] wrote: These are simply over paid, under worked people trying to preserve a way of life - they have no interest whatever in "quality of service" - they would not work in local radio if that were true. They should consider themselves lucky that the BBC Trust was foolish enough to refuse to cut local radio back when it was proposed last year.[/p][/quote]Evenings on Radio Cumbria feature a nation wide Radio 2 style chat with music program hosted by Mark Forest - a presenter in Berkshire - except for the football on Tuesday nights. LOCAL radio? I don't think so - it's just the thin end of the wedge![/p][/quote]It/they really should be closed to save the Licence Fee payer the cost and the oney saved used for better purposes. Helvellyn55

10:01am Tue 19 Feb 13

life cycle too says...

Helvellyn55 wrote:
life cycle too wrote:
Helvellyn55 wrote: These are simply over paid, under worked people trying to preserve a way of life - they have no interest whatever in "quality of service" - they would not work in local radio if that were true. They should consider themselves lucky that the BBC Trust was foolish enough to refuse to cut local radio back when it was proposed last year.
Evenings on Radio Cumbria feature a nation wide Radio 2 style chat with music program hosted by Mark Forest - a presenter in Berkshire - except for the football on Tuesday nights. LOCAL radio? I don't think so - it's just the thin end of the wedge!
It/they really should be closed to save the Licence Fee payer the cost and the oney saved used for better purposes.
On the contrary, it is NATIONAL radio that should be closed and local radio made the primary source of news and information.
Listening to traffic reports relating to Norfolk or Thames Valley is a waste of licence payers money and my time, when we live in CUMBRIA.
[quote][p][bold]Helvellyn55[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]life cycle too[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Helvellyn55[/bold] wrote: These are simply over paid, under worked people trying to preserve a way of life - they have no interest whatever in "quality of service" - they would not work in local radio if that were true. They should consider themselves lucky that the BBC Trust was foolish enough to refuse to cut local radio back when it was proposed last year.[/p][/quote]Evenings on Radio Cumbria feature a nation wide Radio 2 style chat with music program hosted by Mark Forest - a presenter in Berkshire - except for the football on Tuesday nights. LOCAL radio? I don't think so - it's just the thin end of the wedge![/p][/quote]It/they really should be closed to save the Licence Fee payer the cost and the oney saved used for better purposes.[/p][/quote]On the contrary, it is NATIONAL radio that should be closed and local radio made the primary source of news and information. Listening to traffic reports relating to Norfolk or Thames Valley is a waste of licence payers money and my time, when we live in CUMBRIA. life cycle too

9:04pm Wed 20 Feb 13

jazzactivist says...

I'm sick and tired of private sector workers bellyaching about public sector staff expecting decent pay and to keep their jobs. The difference is that most public sector workers deal with serious issues in their working day. Life would be much more difficult for us all without nurses, teachers and decent radio and TV journalists. Whereas, we can do without yet another retail shop, hotel or bank and its staff. People who work for the good of society should get higher pay than people who just work to line the pockets of directors and shareholders, and if they don't like it there is nothing stopping them joining a union and campaigning to prevent redundancies in their own workplace.

Don't forget that BBC Radio Cumbria provides excellent coverage of serious news events such as the Derek Bird shootings and the Cockermouth floods, as they unfolded. Plus, it provides invaluable local information about weather conditions and probably prevents lots of accidents and deaths. It also provides factual support with regard to health and welfare, alongside the lighter topics and music. How many private sector workers can claim that they play such a vital role in society?

It would be a shame if BBC Radio Cumbria suffers more cuts. It already has, and each member of staff deserves to remain in post. BBC Radio Cumbria is an award winning, local radio station and we are lucky to have it as ours. Let's support their action and not allow any more redundancies in a region where decent jobs are thin on the ground.
I'm sick and tired of private sector workers bellyaching about public sector staff expecting decent pay and to keep their jobs. The difference is that most public sector workers deal with serious issues in their working day. Life would be much more difficult for us all without nurses, teachers and decent radio and TV journalists. Whereas, we can do without yet another retail shop, hotel or bank and its staff. People who work for the good of society should get higher pay than people who just work to line the pockets of directors and shareholders, and if they don't like it there is nothing stopping them joining a union and campaigning to prevent redundancies in their own workplace. Don't forget that BBC Radio Cumbria provides excellent coverage of serious news events such as the Derek Bird shootings and the Cockermouth floods, as they unfolded. Plus, it provides invaluable local information about weather conditions and probably prevents lots of accidents and deaths. It also provides factual support with regard to health and welfare, alongside the lighter topics and music. How many private sector workers can claim that they play such a vital role in society? It would be a shame if BBC Radio Cumbria suffers more cuts. It already has, and each member of staff deserves to remain in post. BBC Radio Cumbria is an award winning, local radio station and we are lucky to have it as ours. Let's support their action and not allow any more redundancies in a region where decent jobs are thin on the ground. jazzactivist

11:59am Sat 23 Feb 13

JimTraficantforPresident says...

The last time I listened to Radio Cumbria (it was a while ago) they had an announcer with an Australian accent who didn't know how to pronounce local place names. I decided that if they couldn't employ locals I wouldn't listen to them, and I haven't.
The last time I listened to Radio Cumbria (it was a while ago) they had an announcer with an Australian accent who didn't know how to pronounce local place names. I decided that if they couldn't employ locals I wouldn't listen to them, and I haven't. JimTraficantforPresident

11:25pm Sat 23 Feb 13

Kendal Jock says...

jazzactivist wrote:
I'm sick and tired of private sector workers bellyaching about public sector staff expecting decent pay and to keep their jobs. The difference is that most public sector workers deal with serious issues in their working day. Life would be much more difficult for us all without nurses, teachers and decent radio and TV journalists. Whereas, we can do without yet another retail shop, hotel or bank and its staff. People who work for the good of society should get higher pay than people who just work to line the pockets of directors and shareholders, and if they don't like it there is nothing stopping them joining a union and campaigning to prevent redundancies in their own workplace.

Don't forget that BBC Radio Cumbria provides excellent coverage of serious news events such as the Derek Bird shootings and the Cockermouth floods, as they unfolded. Plus, it provides invaluable local information about weather conditions and probably prevents lots of accidents and deaths. It also provides factual support with regard to health and welfare, alongside the lighter topics and music. How many private sector workers can claim that they play such a vital role in society?

It would be a shame if BBC Radio Cumbria suffers more cuts. It already has, and each member of staff deserves to remain in post. BBC Radio Cumbria is an award winning, local radio station and we are lucky to have it as ours. Let's support their action and not allow any more redundancies in a region where decent jobs are thin on the ground.
It's 'Private Sector workers and private enterprise that keep the country running.
Live in the real world Jazzy.
[quote][p][bold]jazzactivist[/bold] wrote: I'm sick and tired of private sector workers bellyaching about public sector staff expecting decent pay and to keep their jobs. The difference is that most public sector workers deal with serious issues in their working day. Life would be much more difficult for us all without nurses, teachers and decent radio and TV journalists. Whereas, we can do without yet another retail shop, hotel or bank and its staff. People who work for the good of society should get higher pay than people who just work to line the pockets of directors and shareholders, and if they don't like it there is nothing stopping them joining a union and campaigning to prevent redundancies in their own workplace. Don't forget that BBC Radio Cumbria provides excellent coverage of serious news events such as the Derek Bird shootings and the Cockermouth floods, as they unfolded. Plus, it provides invaluable local information about weather conditions and probably prevents lots of accidents and deaths. It also provides factual support with regard to health and welfare, alongside the lighter topics and music. How many private sector workers can claim that they play such a vital role in society? It would be a shame if BBC Radio Cumbria suffers more cuts. It already has, and each member of staff deserves to remain in post. BBC Radio Cumbria is an award winning, local radio station and we are lucky to have it as ours. Let's support their action and not allow any more redundancies in a region where decent jobs are thin on the ground.[/p][/quote]It's 'Private Sector workers and private enterprise that keep the country running. Live in the real world Jazzy. Kendal Jock

12:31am Sun 24 Feb 13

life cycle too says...

JimTraficantforPresi
dent
wrote:
The last time I listened to Radio Cumbria (it was a while ago) they had an announcer with an Australian accent who didn't know how to pronounce local place names. I decided that if they couldn't employ locals I wouldn't listen to them, and I haven't.
That was Kate Stoll - who was on short term attachment and has now returned to her native land - although she did give a report a short while back on the weather in Oz exclusively for Radio Cumbria.

Her diction WAS awful, but I'm sure she learnt much by the time she returned home - and full marks to radio Cumbria for offering the experience.
[quote][p][bold]JimTraficantforPresi dent[/bold] wrote: The last time I listened to Radio Cumbria (it was a while ago) they had an announcer with an Australian accent who didn't know how to pronounce local place names. I decided that if they couldn't employ locals I wouldn't listen to them, and I haven't.[/p][/quote]That was Kate Stoll - who was on short term attachment and has now returned to her native land - although she did give a report a short while back on the weather in Oz exclusively for Radio Cumbria. Her diction WAS awful, but I'm sure she learnt much by the time she returned home - and full marks to radio Cumbria for offering the experience. life cycle too

6:48pm Sun 24 Feb 13

Kendmoor says...

Never listened to the station, but then I don't listen to the radio at all anyway - The only BBC service I use is BBC News and BBC Parliment, both on Iplayer. Never good when jobs are lost, in under threat - but the BBC is facing the onslaught of the digital age, cutbacks and refocusing are going to be at the forefront of the buisness between now and the next review (2016?) I can't imagine the license staying for much longer past 2021 - the digital age will hit it hard, and in turn hit the employees hard. Hopefully what blossoms out of the ashes of it and the people it lets go will be new and different opportunities in the realms of local digital media...
I'm droneing on a bit, sorry, long day! Best of luck to all those involved though!
Never listened to the station, but then I don't listen to the radio at all anyway - The only BBC service I use is BBC News and BBC Parliment, both on Iplayer. Never good when jobs are lost, in under threat - but the BBC is facing the onslaught of the digital age, cutbacks and refocusing are going to be at the forefront of the buisness between now and the next review (2016?) I can't imagine the license staying for much longer past 2021 - the digital age will hit it hard, and in turn hit the employees hard. Hopefully what blossoms out of the ashes of it and the people it lets go will be new and different opportunities in the realms of local digital media... I'm droneing on a bit, sorry, long day! Best of luck to all those involved though! Kendmoor

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