Booths buys wholesaler

NORTH West supermarket chain Booths, which has stores in Kendal, Kirkby Lonsdale, Carnforth, Ulverston, Milnthorpe and Windermere, has made its first acquisition in its 166-year history by buying the fruit and vegetable wholesaler Sharrocks for an undisclosed sum.

Related links

Comments (19)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

5:45pm Wed 11 Dec 13

jazzactivist says...

That's the wholesaler that supplies a number of small fruit and veg shops throughout Cumbria! So now they will have to either buy from Booths or buy from other sources further afield. It will also affect producers who used to sell to Sharrocks forcing them to either supply Booths or look elsewhere. It also means that customers who want to support small businesses may end up buying from Booths by default! Shame on Booths for buying this wholesaler just to serve itself instead of sourcing its produce direct from a wide range of small producers, like it claims. You can clearly never trust a supermarket.
That's the wholesaler that supplies a number of small fruit and veg shops throughout Cumbria! So now they will have to either buy from Booths or buy from other sources further afield. It will also affect producers who used to sell to Sharrocks forcing them to either supply Booths or look elsewhere. It also means that customers who want to support small businesses may end up buying from Booths by default! Shame on Booths for buying this wholesaler just to serve itself instead of sourcing its produce direct from a wide range of small producers, like it claims. You can clearly never trust a supermarket. jazzactivist

11:10pm Wed 11 Dec 13

Cas220 says...

You will find that Booths have always used Sharrocks and it is Sharrocks who source from local suppliers, that is the way supermarkets work, they don't source anything themselves.
You will find that Booths have always used Sharrocks and it is Sharrocks who source from local suppliers, that is the way supermarkets work, they don't source anything themselves. Cas220

10:09am Thu 12 Dec 13

1207 says...

jazzactivist wrote:
That's the wholesaler that supplies a number of small fruit and veg shops throughout Cumbria! So now they will have to either buy from Booths or buy from other sources further afield. It will also affect producers who used to sell to Sharrocks forcing them to either supply Booths or look elsewhere. It also means that customers who want to support small businesses may end up buying from Booths by default! Shame on Booths for buying this wholesaler just to serve itself instead of sourcing its produce direct from a wide range of small producers, like it claims. You can clearly never trust a supermarket.
I think you might find that a separate unconnected company will continue to supply the shops so they will not have to deal with a family owned North West based small chain who take pride in there policy of sourcing from local producers and there support for local foods.
Has jazzactivist not got time to comment on the Tesco plan to destroy Grange over Sands or is he too busy on the other planet were he comes from.
Should not all the small fruit and veg shops grow there own or even support a wholesaler in Cumbria and of course they should only supply things that are native to England and are in season .
[quote][p][bold]jazzactivist[/bold] wrote: That's the wholesaler that supplies a number of small fruit and veg shops throughout Cumbria! So now they will have to either buy from Booths or buy from other sources further afield. It will also affect producers who used to sell to Sharrocks forcing them to either supply Booths or look elsewhere. It also means that customers who want to support small businesses may end up buying from Booths by default! Shame on Booths for buying this wholesaler just to serve itself instead of sourcing its produce direct from a wide range of small producers, like it claims. You can clearly never trust a supermarket.[/p][/quote]I think you might find that a separate unconnected company will continue to supply the shops so they will not have to deal with a family owned North West based small chain who take pride in there policy of sourcing from local producers and there support for local foods. Has jazzactivist not got time to comment on the Tesco plan to destroy Grange over Sands or is he too busy on the other planet were he comes from. Should not all the small fruit and veg shops grow there own or even support a wholesaler in Cumbria and of course they should only supply things that are native to England and are in season . 1207

1:36pm Thu 12 Dec 13

Cas220 says...

And I don't now about anyone else but my 'local' greengrocer does not have locally sourced foods; the lettuce, cucumber and tomatoes are from spain. If I buy those items from ASDA, Booths or Morrison's in Kendal they come from Lancashire and Yorkshire. Small doesn't always mean better!
And I don't now about anyone else but my 'local' greengrocer does not have locally sourced foods; the lettuce, cucumber and tomatoes are from spain. If I buy those items from ASDA, Booths or Morrison's in Kendal they come from Lancashire and Yorkshire. Small doesn't always mean better! Cas220

5:03pm Thu 12 Dec 13

jazzactivist says...

I heard about this planned takeover of Sharrocks by Booths months ago from our local grocer. The fact that Booths already buys some of its produce from Sharrocks isn't the same as Booths owning the whole of Sharrocks, which also (used to) supply other independent shops. I am not sure at all about some people's love affair with Booths. It may have started out as a useful, small, ethical supermarket that only bought and sold local produce, treated its staff well etc, when no other companies did, but as it has grown it has become just as predatory and uncaring as the other big supermarkets. My local grocer has 2/3rds of his shop selling products from in and around the local area, with the imported items clearly marked as such. It's a small, ordinary shop, doing great business, so if he can do it so can all the others. That's IF we are willing to support our independents.

Of course I am not happy about Tesco's inroad into Grange, 1207, and the fact that Tesco kept its identity a secret when buying the former Legion building at auction shows that it knows when it isn't wanted. We already have fab shops in Grange selling everything that would be sold in a Tesco Express, or a Booths. However, this takeover of Sharrocks will make sourcing enough produce more difficult and time consuming for small, independent businesses. Booths knows that, and it's part of its strategy to strangle supplies to small businesses so that it can justify its presence in our towns as the only shop selling a range of local produce. That's not the actions of a "family owned, north west small chain who takes pride..."
I heard about this planned takeover of Sharrocks by Booths months ago from our local grocer. The fact that Booths already buys some of its produce from Sharrocks isn't the same as Booths owning the whole of Sharrocks, which also (used to) supply other independent shops. I am not sure at all about some people's love affair with Booths. It may have started out as a useful, small, ethical supermarket that only bought and sold local produce, treated its staff well etc, when no other companies did, but as it has grown it has become just as predatory and uncaring as the other big supermarkets. My local grocer has 2/3rds of his shop selling products from in and around the local area, with the imported items clearly marked as such. It's a small, ordinary shop, doing great business, so if he can do it so can all the others. That's IF we are willing to support our independents. Of course I am not happy about Tesco's inroad into Grange, 1207, and the fact that Tesco kept its identity a secret when buying the former Legion building at auction shows that it knows when it isn't wanted. We already have fab shops in Grange selling everything that would be sold in a Tesco Express, or a Booths. However, this takeover of Sharrocks will make sourcing enough produce more difficult and time consuming for small, independent businesses. Booths knows that, and it's part of its strategy to strangle supplies to small businesses so that it can justify its presence in our towns as the only shop selling a range of local produce. That's not the actions of a "family owned, north west small chain who takes pride..." jazzactivist

5:16pm Thu 12 Dec 13

jazzactivist says...

Forgot to mention too the extremely glossy, hand-delivered Booths publicity Christmas catalogue that was delivered to every household in Grange by two men in flourescent jackets, even though we don't have a Booth here. It looks like a big, fat copy of a Country Living magazine / cookery book, but there isn't a single dish in it that can't be made from ingredients already available in the existing shops in Grange. I imagine this is a ploy to both get people in Grange shopping in Booths in Windermere or Milnthorpe instead of locally and to present Booths as a highly desirable shop to allow into Grange. Dirty tricks, eh - not so cuddly now, is it?
Forgot to mention too the extremely glossy, hand-delivered Booths publicity Christmas catalogue that was delivered to every household in Grange by two men in flourescent jackets, even though we don't have a Booth here. It looks like a big, fat copy of a Country Living magazine / cookery book, but there isn't a single dish in it that can't be made from ingredients already available in the existing shops in Grange. I imagine this is a ploy to both get people in Grange shopping in Booths in Windermere or Milnthorpe instead of locally and to present Booths as a highly desirable shop to allow into Grange. Dirty tricks, eh - not so cuddly now, is it? jazzactivist

6:55pm Thu 12 Dec 13

fellsman says...

jazzactivist wrote:
Forgot to mention too the extremely glossy, hand-delivered Booths publicity Christmas catalogue that was delivered to every household in Grange by two men in flourescent jackets, even though we don't have a Booth here. It looks like a big, fat copy of a Country Living magazine / cookery book, but there isn't a single dish in it that can't be made from ingredients already available in the existing shops in Grange. I imagine this is a ploy to both get people in Grange shopping in Booths in Windermere or Milnthorpe instead of locally and to present Booths as a highly desirable shop to allow into Grange. Dirty tricks, eh - not so cuddly now, is it?
It's called business - businesses like Booths employ far more people across their network than a handful of small shops - a supermarket in a town is a major employer of local people, surely that has to be good for the local economy
[quote][p][bold]jazzactivist[/bold] wrote: Forgot to mention too the extremely glossy, hand-delivered Booths publicity Christmas catalogue that was delivered to every household in Grange by two men in flourescent jackets, even though we don't have a Booth here. It looks like a big, fat copy of a Country Living magazine / cookery book, but there isn't a single dish in it that can't be made from ingredients already available in the existing shops in Grange. I imagine this is a ploy to both get people in Grange shopping in Booths in Windermere or Milnthorpe instead of locally and to present Booths as a highly desirable shop to allow into Grange. Dirty tricks, eh - not so cuddly now, is it?[/p][/quote]It's called business - businesses like Booths employ far more people across their network than a handful of small shops - a supermarket in a town is a major employer of local people, surely that has to be good for the local economy fellsman

7:15pm Thu 12 Dec 13

1207 says...

The first recipe is for game casserole I think that you should be able to get all the things you need from the butchers greengrocers and Spar.
I should point out that I only shop at Booths about once a week and tend to shop at Asda or Kendal Market so I am not promoting any particular store.
The bloke I spoke to in the veg shop today told me that he was getting his stuff from the man who sold Shorrocks to Booths and has set up a new company to supply his other customers.
Good god men in flourescent jackets walking around Grange the next thing you know there will be a guy with a red suit and white beard putting things under your locally grown Christmas tree or am I living in a old fashioned fairytale world just like someone else.
If you don't like the politics of a company its simple DONT shop there and if you are in the majority the that shop will close down.
The first recipe is for game casserole I think that you should be able to get all the things you need from the butchers greengrocers and Spar. I should point out that I only shop at Booths about once a week and tend to shop at Asda or Kendal Market so I am not promoting any particular store. The bloke I spoke to in the veg shop today told me that he was getting his stuff from the man who sold Shorrocks to Booths and has set up a new company to supply his other customers. Good god men in flourescent jackets walking around Grange the next thing you know there will be a guy with a red suit and white beard putting things under your locally grown Christmas tree or am I living in a old fashioned fairytale world just like someone else. If you don't like the politics of a company its simple DONT shop there and if you are in the majority the that shop will close down. 1207

8:07pm Thu 12 Dec 13

onelocal says...

Jazzactivist Sometimes you need to stop and think in your Jean D'Arc zeal to banish supermarkets. Sharrocks have been a supplier of fruit and veg to Booths for years. Often family businesses cannot keep up as a supplier to a fast growing customer, without outside investment. It may be that Booths, in order to ensure the continued viability and expansionability of their key supplier have put investment into it, taking a majority ownership. One of the Sharrocks brothers will take a senior position at Booths.
As 1207 said, Sharrocks will separate their wholesale business to other customers. So in the end nothing will change. Booths having invested in Sharrocks, will continue to be supplied by them and Sharrocks will be able to grow and invest to keep pace with Booths needs. Other customers will continue to be supplied by a spin off of Sharrocks. The fruit and veg will be the same high quality. Unfortunately the food retail business cannot stay embedded in the 50s and 60s, the population and the volumes of food have grown since those idyllic days.
Jazzactivist Sometimes you need to stop and think in your Jean D'Arc zeal to banish supermarkets. Sharrocks have been a supplier of fruit and veg to Booths for years. Often family businesses cannot keep up as a supplier to a fast growing customer, without outside investment. It may be that Booths, in order to ensure the continued viability and expansionability of their key supplier have put investment into it, taking a majority ownership. One of the Sharrocks brothers will take a senior position at Booths. As 1207 said, Sharrocks will separate their wholesale business to other customers. So in the end nothing will change. Booths having invested in Sharrocks, will continue to be supplied by them and Sharrocks will be able to grow and invest to keep pace with Booths needs. Other customers will continue to be supplied by a spin off of Sharrocks. The fruit and veg will be the same high quality. Unfortunately the food retail business cannot stay embedded in the 50s and 60s, the population and the volumes of food have grown since those idyllic days. onelocal

11:56pm Thu 12 Dec 13

1207 says...

onelocal wrote:
Jazzactivist Sometimes you need to stop and think in your Jean D'Arc zeal to banish supermarkets. Sharrocks have been a supplier of fruit and veg to Booths for years. Often family businesses cannot keep up as a supplier to a fast growing customer, without outside investment. It may be that Booths, in order to ensure the continued viability and expansionability of their key supplier have put investment into it, taking a majority ownership. One of the Sharrocks brothers will take a senior position at Booths.
As 1207 said, Sharrocks will separate their wholesale business to other customers. So in the end nothing will change. Booths having invested in Sharrocks, will continue to be supplied by them and Sharrocks will be able to grow and invest to keep pace with Booths needs. Other customers will continue to be supplied by a spin off of Sharrocks. The fruit and veg will be the same high quality. Unfortunately the food retail business cannot stay embedded in the 50s and 60s, the population and the volumes of food have grown since those idyllic days.
Exactly,
Now what about Sainsburys in (sorry) just outside Kendal or in Ulverston and next to Hays and why not the farce that is K Village .
[quote][p][bold]onelocal[/bold] wrote: Jazzactivist Sometimes you need to stop and think in your Jean D'Arc zeal to banish supermarkets. Sharrocks have been a supplier of fruit and veg to Booths for years. Often family businesses cannot keep up as a supplier to a fast growing customer, without outside investment. It may be that Booths, in order to ensure the continued viability and expansionability of their key supplier have put investment into it, taking a majority ownership. One of the Sharrocks brothers will take a senior position at Booths. As 1207 said, Sharrocks will separate their wholesale business to other customers. So in the end nothing will change. Booths having invested in Sharrocks, will continue to be supplied by them and Sharrocks will be able to grow and invest to keep pace with Booths needs. Other customers will continue to be supplied by a spin off of Sharrocks. The fruit and veg will be the same high quality. Unfortunately the food retail business cannot stay embedded in the 50s and 60s, the population and the volumes of food have grown since those idyllic days.[/p][/quote]Exactly, Now what about Sainsburys in (sorry) just outside Kendal or in Ulverston and next to Hays and why not the farce that is K Village . 1207

8:12am Fri 13 Dec 13

Moonbase says...

Booth's as James Hall (Spar) are very well established business's in the North West, and employ thousands and have had to endure changes in markets over the years from supermarkets.
10 out of 10 for looking out for their future and sustaining jobs!
Booth's as James Hall (Spar) are very well established business's in the North West, and employ thousands and have had to endure changes in markets over the years from supermarkets. 10 out of 10 for looking out for their future and sustaining jobs! Moonbase

8:21pm Sat 14 Dec 13

jazzactivist says...

It's not just about creating jobs though - if you can call part-time, zero hours, low-paid work for a £multi-million corporation "jobs". It's about understanding local economics and social capital. Small, independent business owners whose main customers are the local community have a vested interest in spending a lot of the money they make from their business within that same community - supporting local suppliers, employing local people, buying what they need in their own lives from other local shops and businesses, keeping on good terms with local people, taking part in local activities and campaigns, being visible so that everyone knows who owns that business etc. All of that ensures that most of the money they makes circulates in a local area, and they build up inter-dependent relationships with local people to keep their business going. Small business owners who don't do that soon go out of business. Whereas, a large, centrally-controlled supermarket has no reason to invest in a local community as it has a number of other buffers. It will be investing its profits elsewhere, even sending our money abroad, and not developing an inter-dependent relationship with the local community as it has no intention of staying if the profits drop.

Acting in a predatory way, where an area is assessed according to whether there is already a thriving high street so the supermarket wants some of that money, and going all out to use whatever tricks are possible to find a way in and not care about how that affects existing businesses, is not "business". It is underhand, dirty, profiteering. I've never been into a Booths, because I think its behaviour is as bad as any other supermarket chain, but that doesn't mean I can't have an opinion on the bigger picture of what happens to towns and villages when one of these behemoths hunkers down in or nearby. It's basic transactional analysis - if you circulate more 'cold pricklies' than 'warm fuzzies' soon you end up with only a few 'cold pricklies'!

Just chatting to our grocer this morning - Sharrocks' owner may be setting up a separate wholesale business to supply other shops, but prices to small shops will end up higher as they don't have the buying power of Booths who will hoover up the best suppliers. It's divide and conquer, and it seems so obvious to me that I can't see why other people can't see it. Is it really so much hassle to do all your shopping in local, independent shops and support your local economy?
It's not just about creating jobs though - if you can call part-time, zero hours, low-paid work for a £multi-million corporation "jobs". It's about understanding local economics and social capital. Small, independent business owners whose main customers are the local community have a vested interest in spending a lot of the money they make from their business within that same community - supporting local suppliers, employing local people, buying what they need in their own lives from other local shops and businesses, keeping on good terms with local people, taking part in local activities and campaigns, being visible so that everyone knows who owns that business etc. All of that ensures that most of the money they makes circulates in a local area, and they build up inter-dependent relationships with local people to keep their business going. Small business owners who don't do that soon go out of business. Whereas, a large, centrally-controlled supermarket has no reason to invest in a local community as it has a number of other buffers. It will be investing its profits elsewhere, even sending our money abroad, and not developing an inter-dependent relationship with the local community as it has no intention of staying if the profits drop. Acting in a predatory way, where an area is assessed according to whether there is already a thriving high street so the supermarket wants some of that money, and going all out to use whatever tricks are possible to find a way in and not care about how that affects existing businesses, is not "business". It is underhand, dirty, profiteering. I've never been into a Booths, because I think its behaviour is as bad as any other supermarket chain, but that doesn't mean I can't have an opinion on the bigger picture of what happens to towns and villages when one of these behemoths hunkers down in or nearby. It's basic transactional analysis - if you circulate more 'cold pricklies' than 'warm fuzzies' soon you end up with only a few 'cold pricklies'! Just chatting to our grocer this morning - Sharrocks' owner may be setting up a separate wholesale business to supply other shops, but prices to small shops will end up higher as they don't have the buying power of Booths who will hoover up the best suppliers. It's divide and conquer, and it seems so obvious to me that I can't see why other people can't see it. Is it really so much hassle to do all your shopping in local, independent shops and support your local economy? jazzactivist

9:58pm Sat 14 Dec 13

1207 says...

jazzactivist wrote:
It's not just about creating jobs though - if you can call part-time, zero hours, low-paid work for a £multi-million corporation "jobs". It's about understanding local economics and social capital. Small, independent business owners whose main customers are the local community have a vested interest in spending a lot of the money they make from their business within that same community - supporting local suppliers, employing local people, buying what they need in their own lives from other local shops and businesses, keeping on good terms with local people, taking part in local activities and campaigns, being visible so that everyone knows who owns that business etc. All of that ensures that most of the money they makes circulates in a local area, and they build up inter-dependent relationships with local people to keep their business going. Small business owners who don't do that soon go out of business. Whereas, a large, centrally-controlled supermarket has no reason to invest in a local community as it has a number of other buffers. It will be investing its profits elsewhere, even sending our money abroad, and not developing an inter-dependent relationship with the local community as it has no intention of staying if the profits drop.

Acting in a predatory way, where an area is assessed according to whether there is already a thriving high street so the supermarket wants some of that money, and going all out to use whatever tricks are possible to find a way in and not care about how that affects existing businesses, is not "business". It is underhand, dirty, profiteering. I've never been into a Booths, because I think its behaviour is as bad as any other supermarket chain, but that doesn't mean I can't have an opinion on the bigger picture of what happens to towns and villages when one of these behemoths hunkers down in or nearby. It's basic transactional analysis - if you circulate more 'cold pricklies' than 'warm fuzzies' soon you end up with only a few 'cold pricklies'!

Just chatting to our grocer this morning - Sharrocks' owner may be setting up a separate wholesale business to supply other shops, but prices to small shops will end up higher as they don't have the buying power of Booths who will hoover up the best suppliers. It's divide and conquer, and it seems so obvious to me that I can't see why other people can't see it. Is it really so much hassle to do all your shopping in local, independent shops and support your local economy?
Of course you have your own opinions as do we all and we all have the ability to shop with our feet.
I don't like Tesco and there business practice BUT at least I tried them before I made my mind up.
However I think that you might need to take off the rose tinted glasses now and again.
It is a pity that only a few of us seem to care one way or the other so lets agree to differ.
[quote][p][bold]jazzactivist[/bold] wrote: It's not just about creating jobs though - if you can call part-time, zero hours, low-paid work for a £multi-million corporation "jobs". It's about understanding local economics and social capital. Small, independent business owners whose main customers are the local community have a vested interest in spending a lot of the money they make from their business within that same community - supporting local suppliers, employing local people, buying what they need in their own lives from other local shops and businesses, keeping on good terms with local people, taking part in local activities and campaigns, being visible so that everyone knows who owns that business etc. All of that ensures that most of the money they makes circulates in a local area, and they build up inter-dependent relationships with local people to keep their business going. Small business owners who don't do that soon go out of business. Whereas, a large, centrally-controlled supermarket has no reason to invest in a local community as it has a number of other buffers. It will be investing its profits elsewhere, even sending our money abroad, and not developing an inter-dependent relationship with the local community as it has no intention of staying if the profits drop. Acting in a predatory way, where an area is assessed according to whether there is already a thriving high street so the supermarket wants some of that money, and going all out to use whatever tricks are possible to find a way in and not care about how that affects existing businesses, is not "business". It is underhand, dirty, profiteering. I've never been into a Booths, because I think its behaviour is as bad as any other supermarket chain, but that doesn't mean I can't have an opinion on the bigger picture of what happens to towns and villages when one of these behemoths hunkers down in or nearby. It's basic transactional analysis - if you circulate more 'cold pricklies' than 'warm fuzzies' soon you end up with only a few 'cold pricklies'! Just chatting to our grocer this morning - Sharrocks' owner may be setting up a separate wholesale business to supply other shops, but prices to small shops will end up higher as they don't have the buying power of Booths who will hoover up the best suppliers. It's divide and conquer, and it seems so obvious to me that I can't see why other people can't see it. Is it really so much hassle to do all your shopping in local, independent shops and support your local economy?[/p][/quote]Of course you have your own opinions as do we all and we all have the ability to shop with our feet. I don't like Tesco and there business practice BUT at least I tried them before I made my mind up. However I think that you might need to take off the rose tinted glasses now and again. It is a pity that only a few of us seem to care one way or the other so lets agree to differ. 1207

9:09am Sun 15 Dec 13

jazzactivist says...

I am just very concerned, 1207, that we will end up with no other shops in our towns and villages than supermarkets on the outskirts. I've seen it happen a lot In other parts of the country, where a nice town ends up with only a Bargain Booze, Tesco Express, Bookies and Poundland in the high street and two big supermarkets at either end of town. These big players put such a stranglehold on a place that the small businesses just can't keep up, so the people there end up in a very short space of time with only rubbish to buy at inflated prices because those initial offers just dry up when there is no competition. I too used to shop in Tesco many years ago before I started to feel uncomfortable about it after seeing what it did to my local town, and I made the decision not to shop in supermarkets, mainstream chain stores, or multinationals again.

I am not as old as some people on here seem to think - a young child in the 60s / 70s when supermarkets were the trendy 'next big thing', and young in the 80s when big was considered best and small businesses were few and far between. However, over the last two decades there has been a huge surge in interest in better quality food, cooking, and more thoughtful shopping. Instead of the supermarkets being willing to put up with that as 'just business', as they expect small businesses to do about them, they are fighting back with a bag of tricks and trying to take that custom. Even chains like Booths that started off well, are forcing themselves in on the 'game. There are 5 Booths stores within 30 min drive in different directions from my house, so how can that be right?

I think we are extremely lucky here to have such vibrant towns where it is possible to buy high quality, reasonably priced food very easily. There are lots of people of all ages here opening and running local shops and businesses to serve our communities, and it is probably one of the only parts of the UK where you can literally buy everything you need and want without ever stepping into a supermarket or other big chain store. That level of local support shouldn't be wasted on big chains that don't put anything of value into our local communities and don't care what happens to them in the long term.
I am just very concerned, 1207, that we will end up with no other shops in our towns and villages than supermarkets on the outskirts. I've seen it happen a lot In other parts of the country, where a nice town ends up with only a Bargain Booze, Tesco Express, Bookies and Poundland in the high street and two big supermarkets at either end of town. These big players put such a stranglehold on a place that the small businesses just can't keep up, so the people there end up in a very short space of time with only rubbish to buy at inflated prices because those initial offers just dry up when there is no competition. I too used to shop in Tesco many years ago before I started to feel uncomfortable about it after seeing what it did to my local town, and I made the decision not to shop in supermarkets, mainstream chain stores, or multinationals again. I am not as old as some people on here seem to think - a young child in the 60s / 70s when supermarkets were the trendy 'next big thing', and young in the 80s when big was considered best and small businesses were few and far between. However, over the last two decades there has been a huge surge in interest in better quality food, cooking, and more thoughtful shopping. Instead of the supermarkets being willing to put up with that as 'just business', as they expect small businesses to do about them, they are fighting back with a bag of tricks and trying to take that custom. Even chains like Booths that started off well, are forcing themselves in on the 'game. There are 5 Booths stores within 30 min drive in different directions from my house, so how can that be right? I think we are extremely lucky here to have such vibrant towns where it is possible to buy high quality, reasonably priced food very easily. There are lots of people of all ages here opening and running local shops and businesses to serve our communities, and it is probably one of the only parts of the UK where you can literally buy everything you need and want without ever stepping into a supermarket or other big chain store. That level of local support shouldn't be wasted on big chains that don't put anything of value into our local communities and don't care what happens to them in the long term. jazzactivist

12:37pm Sun 15 Dec 13

onelocal says...

Imagine Kendal without ASDA and Morrisons. Imagine all the people of Kendal doing their food shopping and whatever else they buy there, in Kendal High Street. Imagine the car parking that would be required. Imagine the delivery trucks blocking every available space. Imagine the queues at the butchers, the bakers and the fruit and veg shops. Imagine the traffic jams into Kendal and around its streets, which can be bad enough today. I think your idyll of a world without supermarkets is not so ideal after all
Imagine Kendal without ASDA and Morrisons. Imagine all the people of Kendal doing their food shopping and whatever else they buy there, in Kendal High Street. Imagine the car parking that would be required. Imagine the delivery trucks blocking every available space. Imagine the queues at the butchers, the bakers and the fruit and veg shops. Imagine the traffic jams into Kendal and around its streets, which can be bad enough today. I think your idyll of a world without supermarkets is not so ideal after all onelocal

9:34am Mon 16 Dec 13

fellsman says...

Kendal is not suited to the ideal world that jazz activist seems to yearn for - there is inadequate parking - the one way system is chaotic most of the time. A lot of these small towns were great for providing for the needs of the public in the past, but that was in a past where many families didn't even have a car, now the majority of households will have at least two. These town certainly could never cope with the demand nowadays. I can remember Saturdays going to Kendal by bus not to do grocery shopping but for many other things - long waits at bus stops, sometimes horrendous journeys, especially before Staveley was by passed and then having to lug everything around town and wait for the bus back to Windermere, a full day taken up to do a bit of shopping. Thank God for progress!!
Kendal is not suited to the ideal world that jazz activist seems to yearn for - there is inadequate parking - the one way system is chaotic most of the time. A lot of these small towns were great for providing for the needs of the public in the past, but that was in a past where many families didn't even have a car, now the majority of households will have at least two. These town certainly could never cope with the demand nowadays. I can remember Saturdays going to Kendal by bus not to do grocery shopping but for many other things - long waits at bus stops, sometimes horrendous journeys, especially before Staveley was by passed and then having to lug everything around town and wait for the bus back to Windermere, a full day taken up to do a bit of shopping. Thank God for progress!! fellsman

5:51pm Mon 16 Dec 13

churchy66 says...

onelocal wrote:
Imagine Kendal without ASDA and Morrisons. Imagine all the people of Kendal doing their food shopping and whatever else they buy there, in Kendal High Street. Imagine the car parking that would be required. Imagine the delivery trucks blocking every available space. Imagine the queues at the butchers, the bakers and the fruit and veg shops. Imagine the traffic jams into Kendal and around its streets, which can be bad enough today. I think your idyll of a world without supermarkets is not so ideal after all
You mean exactly it was back in the early eighties - a thriving high street, with the market well used, as were all the butchers shop and bakeries and grocery shops. It was a pleasure to shop!
[quote][p][bold]onelocal[/bold] wrote: Imagine Kendal without ASDA and Morrisons. Imagine all the people of Kendal doing their food shopping and whatever else they buy there, in Kendal High Street. Imagine the car parking that would be required. Imagine the delivery trucks blocking every available space. Imagine the queues at the butchers, the bakers and the fruit and veg shops. Imagine the traffic jams into Kendal and around its streets, which can be bad enough today. I think your idyll of a world without supermarkets is not so ideal after all[/p][/quote]You mean exactly it was back in the early eighties - a thriving high street, with the market well used, as were all the butchers shop and bakeries and grocery shops. It was a pleasure to shop! churchy66

8:02am Tue 17 Dec 13

1207 says...

churchy66 wrote:
onelocal wrote:
Imagine Kendal without ASDA and Morrisons. Imagine all the people of Kendal doing their food shopping and whatever else they buy there, in Kendal High Street. Imagine the car parking that would be required. Imagine the delivery trucks blocking every available space. Imagine the queues at the butchers, the bakers and the fruit and veg shops. Imagine the traffic jams into Kendal and around its streets, which can be bad enough today. I think your idyll of a world without supermarkets is not so ideal after all
You mean exactly it was back in the early eighties - a thriving high street, with the market well used, as were all the butchers shop and bakeries and grocery shops. It was a pleasure to shop!
Thirty years ago..that's THIRTY YEARS AGO.
We would travel to Lancaster or Barrow to shop at Asda for a big shop every
four weeks .
[quote][p][bold]churchy66[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]onelocal[/bold] wrote: Imagine Kendal without ASDA and Morrisons. Imagine all the people of Kendal doing their food shopping and whatever else they buy there, in Kendal High Street. Imagine the car parking that would be required. Imagine the delivery trucks blocking every available space. Imagine the queues at the butchers, the bakers and the fruit and veg shops. Imagine the traffic jams into Kendal and around its streets, which can be bad enough today. I think your idyll of a world without supermarkets is not so ideal after all[/p][/quote]You mean exactly it was back in the early eighties - a thriving high street, with the market well used, as were all the butchers shop and bakeries and grocery shops. It was a pleasure to shop![/p][/quote]Thirty years ago..that's THIRTY YEARS AGO. We would travel to Lancaster or Barrow to shop at Asda for a big shop every four weeks . 1207

6:35pm Tue 17 Dec 13

churchy66 says...

1207 wrote:
churchy66 wrote:
onelocal wrote: Imagine Kendal without ASDA and Morrisons. Imagine all the people of Kendal doing their food shopping and whatever else they buy there, in Kendal High Street. Imagine the car parking that would be required. Imagine the delivery trucks blocking every available space. Imagine the queues at the butchers, the bakers and the fruit and veg shops. Imagine the traffic jams into Kendal and around its streets, which can be bad enough today. I think your idyll of a world without supermarkets is not so ideal after all
You mean exactly it was back in the early eighties - a thriving high street, with the market well used, as were all the butchers shop and bakeries and grocery shops. It was a pleasure to shop!
Thirty years ago..that's THIRTY YEARS AGO. We would travel to Lancaster or Barrow to shop at Asda for a big shop every four weeks .
Yep I can count - amazing at the grand age of 47! We manage successfully without visiting a supermarket, I can not remember when my family last used one. We are not well off, but we use the local shops in Kendal - and without the use of a car.
[quote][p][bold]1207[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]churchy66[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]onelocal[/bold] wrote: Imagine Kendal without ASDA and Morrisons. Imagine all the people of Kendal doing their food shopping and whatever else they buy there, in Kendal High Street. Imagine the car parking that would be required. Imagine the delivery trucks blocking every available space. Imagine the queues at the butchers, the bakers and the fruit and veg shops. Imagine the traffic jams into Kendal and around its streets, which can be bad enough today. I think your idyll of a world without supermarkets is not so ideal after all[/p][/quote]You mean exactly it was back in the early eighties - a thriving high street, with the market well used, as were all the butchers shop and bakeries and grocery shops. It was a pleasure to shop![/p][/quote]Thirty years ago..that's THIRTY YEARS AGO. We would travel to Lancaster or Barrow to shop at Asda for a big shop every four weeks .[/p][/quote]Yep I can count - amazing at the grand age of 47! We manage successfully without visiting a supermarket, I can not remember when my family last used one. We are not well off, but we use the local shops in Kendal - and without the use of a car. churchy66

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree