Giant eagle on the loose in Yorkshire Dales

The Westmorland Gazette: Nikita, the missing Eagle Nikita, the missing Eagle

A GIANT bird of prey has gone missing in the Yorkshire Dales.
 

Nikita, a ten-year-old Steller’s sea eagle went missing on Saturday morning (January 25) during training at the Hawk Experience in Brackenbottom.
 

North Yorkshire police said on twitter that the bird of prey 'is not dangerous to people but don’t try picking it up'.
 

They also warned the public to take care when letting small animals out in the garden.
 

Chris O’Donnell, the eagle’s trainer said the public had nothing to worry about and the bird of prey posed no threat or danger to the public.
 

Mr O’Donnell said: “It was very windy on Saturday and Nikita possibly became disorientated because of the weather and went a little bit further than she normally does.”
 

She has not been spotted since.
 

“She is extremely striking in appearance. She has an 8ft wing span and a bright yellow beak so she will obviously stand out.
 

“This whole ‘killer’ eagle is nonsense. People have nothing to worry about, their pets will be safe.
 

“Hopefully she will find her way back,” added Mr O'Donnell.
 

Related links

The police has asked anyone who spots the bird to call 101 and quote reference 0246.

Or alternatively call Hawk Experience on 01729 860316.

 

 

 

Comments (10)

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10:23pm Tue 28 Jan 14

Milkbutnosugarplease says...

We are unable to accept comments for eagle reasons.
We are unable to accept comments for eagle reasons. Milkbutnosugarplease

4:43pm Wed 29 Jan 14

searcher21c says...

"Giant eagle." How much bigger is it than a normal one?
"Giant eagle." How much bigger is it than a normal one? searcher21c

11:38pm Wed 29 Jan 14

onelocal says...

searcher21c wrote:
"Giant eagle." How much bigger is it than a normal one?
About 20 - 25% bigger in wingspan and body length than a Golden Eagle. The biggest Eagle in the old, so I guess giant is a good description
[quote][p][bold]searcher21c[/bold] wrote: "Giant eagle." How much bigger is it than a normal one?[/p][/quote]About 20 - 25% bigger in wingspan and body length than a Golden Eagle. The biggest Eagle in the old, so I guess giant is a good description onelocal

11:39pm Wed 29 Jan 14

onelocal says...

onelocal wrote:
searcher21c wrote:
"Giant eagle." How much bigger is it than a normal one?
About 20 - 25% bigger in wingspan and body length than a Golden Eagle. The biggest Eagle in the old, so I guess giant is a good description
*world
[quote][p][bold]onelocal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]searcher21c[/bold] wrote: "Giant eagle." How much bigger is it than a normal one?[/p][/quote]About 20 - 25% bigger in wingspan and body length than a Golden Eagle. The biggest Eagle in the old, so I guess giant is a good description[/p][/quote]*world onelocal

9:41am Thu 30 Jan 14

thegirlal says...

So the bird has escaped and I truly hope that it is found safe and well. But I would bet that we may never hear about it. The media always reports escaped animals/prisoners however we don't necessarily hear of their recapture.
So the bird has escaped and I truly hope that it is found safe and well. But I would bet that we may never hear about it. The media always reports escaped animals/prisoners however we don't necessarily hear of their recapture. thegirlal

5:42pm Thu 30 Jan 14

jazzactivist says...

I hope it can survive in the wild and, if so, we should just be glad it is free and let it go. I hope I get the chance to see it. All this fuss about it not being any danger to people etc - are there really people who worry about their own safety first when they may have the chance to see a beautiful bird out in the wild?
I hope it can survive in the wild and, if so, we should just be glad it is free and let it go. I hope I get the chance to see it. All this fuss about it not being any danger to people etc - are there really people who worry about their own safety first when they may have the chance to see a beautiful bird out in the wild? jazzactivist

6:24pm Thu 30 Jan 14

onelocal says...

jazzactivist wrote:
I hope it can survive in the wild and, if so, we should just be glad it is free and let it go. I hope I get the chance to see it. All this fuss about it not being any danger to people etc - are there really people who worry about their own safety first when they may have the chance to see a beautiful bird out in the wild?
Too late; the non native species was already back where it belonged, in captivity, before you wrote. A bird such as this, released in the wild, can only upset the local balance of nature, and would have no opportunity to breed, so little or no point getting sentimental about it.
[quote][p][bold]jazzactivist[/bold] wrote: I hope it can survive in the wild and, if so, we should just be glad it is free and let it go. I hope I get the chance to see it. All this fuss about it not being any danger to people etc - are there really people who worry about their own safety first when they may have the chance to see a beautiful bird out in the wild?[/p][/quote]Too late; the non native species was already back where it belonged, in captivity, before you wrote. A bird such as this, released in the wild, can only upset the local balance of nature, and would have no opportunity to breed, so little or no point getting sentimental about it. onelocal

6:29pm Fri 31 Jan 14

jazzactivist says...

That's a bit mean, onelocal. It isn't about feeling sentimental, but about wanting to see captive animals and birds free in the wild. So that they can live what short life they may have at least experiencing something of what they would naturally do. Is there much point in breeding rare animals and birds in captivity to preserve them, if that's all they and we will ever know? Also, who says it is a "non native" species? Sea eagles are found in Scotland, Scandinavia and coastal North America, and none of those places are far away from the Yorkshire Dales and Cumbria.
That's a bit mean, onelocal. It isn't about feeling sentimental, but about wanting to see captive animals and birds free in the wild. So that they can live what short life they may have at least experiencing something of what they would naturally do. Is there much point in breeding rare animals and birds in captivity to preserve them, if that's all they and we will ever know? Also, who says it is a "non native" species? Sea eagles are found in Scotland, Scandinavia and coastal North America, and none of those places are far away from the Yorkshire Dales and Cumbria. jazzactivist

9:01pm Fri 31 Jan 14

onelocal says...

jazzactivist wrote:
That's a bit mean, onelocal. It isn't about feeling sentimental, but about wanting to see captive animals and birds free in the wild. So that they can live what short life they may have at least experiencing something of what they would naturally do. Is there much point in breeding rare animals and birds in captivity to preserve them, if that's all they and we will ever know? Also, who says it is a "non native" species? Sea eagles are found in Scotland, Scandinavia and coastal North America, and none of those places are far away from the Yorkshire Dales and Cumbria.
To answer your question, I say it's "non native". It's not difficult to look it up on the web. This particular Sea Eagle, Steller's comes from the Far East, and is not related to the Sea Eagles you refer to and as mentioned before is around 25% larger than our local Eagles, so could probably do some serious damage if it got hungry. Without knowing the background of this particular bird, was it found injured, orphaned etc, you can't be judgmental about how it lives or what is good for it. I'm sure it is well looked after, gets to do most of the things it would do in the wild, and is well fed.
[quote][p][bold]jazzactivist[/bold] wrote: That's a bit mean, onelocal. It isn't about feeling sentimental, but about wanting to see captive animals and birds free in the wild. So that they can live what short life they may have at least experiencing something of what they would naturally do. Is there much point in breeding rare animals and birds in captivity to preserve them, if that's all they and we will ever know? Also, who says it is a "non native" species? Sea eagles are found in Scotland, Scandinavia and coastal North America, and none of those places are far away from the Yorkshire Dales and Cumbria.[/p][/quote]To answer your question, I say it's "non native". It's not difficult to look it up on the web. This particular Sea Eagle, Steller's comes from the Far East, and is not related to the Sea Eagles you refer to and as mentioned before is around 25% larger than our local Eagles, so could probably do some serious damage if it got hungry. Without knowing the background of this particular bird, was it found injured, orphaned etc, you can't be judgmental about how it lives or what is good for it. I'm sure it is well looked after, gets to do most of the things it would do in the wild, and is well fed. onelocal

5:47pm Sun 2 Feb 14

jazzactivist says...

It's not about being "judgmental" One Local, it's about whether you believe that a short life in the wild if preferable to a long one in captivity. I happen to believe in the first. What 'damage' are you referring to? I can't imagine even a very large eagle would eat more than the amount of food it needs to stay alive, and if that's a couple of rabbits or a lamb every couple of days it's not too much of a loss. It just depends on your viewpoint. I think it's sad to see animals and birds cooped up in cages or sanctuaries, or birds of prey on display in shops such as currently in the centre of Kendal. I'd like to see the re-wilding of some of the Yorkshire Dales and Lake District.
It's not about being "judgmental" One Local, it's about whether you believe that a short life in the wild if preferable to a long one in captivity. I happen to believe in the first. What 'damage' are you referring to? I can't imagine even a very large eagle would eat more than the amount of food it needs to stay alive, and if that's a couple of rabbits or a lamb every couple of days it's not too much of a loss. It just depends on your viewpoint. I think it's sad to see animals and birds cooped up in cages or sanctuaries, or birds of prey on display in shops such as currently in the centre of Kendal. I'd like to see the re-wilding of some of the Yorkshire Dales and Lake District. jazzactivist

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