Dog owner hunted after ewe and two lambs killed near Ambleside

First published in News

POLICE have said a ewe and two lambs have been killed in a dog attack at Skelwith Fold near Ambleside.

The incident is believed to have happened sometime between 10am yesterday morning (Saturday) ajnd 8am today (Sunday).

Police are appealing for witnesses and have urged dog owners to keep their pets on a lead.

Anyone with information should contact Pc Alan Buchanan of Windermere Police by calling the non-ememergency number 101.

Comments (10)

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10:37am Mon 19 May 14

Nightblogger says...

Reprehensible though this incident undoubtedly is there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside. Dogs should be kept 'under close control', and if necessary, especially near livestock or nesting birds, on a lead. Particularly in the lakes there are plenty of dogs that are very well trained and do not bother sheep or lambs and can walk reliably to heel through a field of livestock. There is no reason why these should be so restricted in the countryside. Of course if your dog is not well trained, is unreliable or unpredictable then that is a different matter.

The worst offenders that regularly allow dogs to chase sheep in the countryside are the Shepherds......
Reprehensible though this incident undoubtedly is there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside. Dogs should be kept 'under close control', and if necessary, especially near livestock or nesting birds, on a lead. Particularly in the lakes there are plenty of dogs that are very well trained and do not bother sheep or lambs and can walk reliably to heel through a field of livestock. There is no reason why these should be so restricted in the countryside. Of course if your dog is not well trained, is unreliable or unpredictable then that is a different matter. The worst offenders that regularly allow dogs to chase sheep in the countryside are the Shepherds...... Nightblogger
  • Score: -31

1:45pm Mon 19 May 14

Pringle1982 says...

Nightblogger wrote:
Reprehensible though this incident undoubtedly is there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside. Dogs should be kept 'under close control', and if necessary, especially near livestock or nesting birds, on a lead. Particularly in the lakes there are plenty of dogs that are very well trained and do not bother sheep or lambs and can walk reliably to heel through a field of livestock. There is no reason why these should be so restricted in the countryside. Of course if your dog is not well trained, is unreliable or unpredictable then that is a different matter.

The worst offenders that regularly allow dogs to chase sheep in the countryside are the Shepherds......
Yes, there is actually:

http://www.legislati
on.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz
2/1-2/28
[quote][p][bold]Nightblogger[/bold] wrote: Reprehensible though this incident undoubtedly is there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside. Dogs should be kept 'under close control', and if necessary, especially near livestock or nesting birds, on a lead. Particularly in the lakes there are plenty of dogs that are very well trained and do not bother sheep or lambs and can walk reliably to heel through a field of livestock. There is no reason why these should be so restricted in the countryside. Of course if your dog is not well trained, is unreliable or unpredictable then that is a different matter. The worst offenders that regularly allow dogs to chase sheep in the countryside are the Shepherds......[/p][/quote]Yes, there is actually: http://www.legislati on.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz 2/1-2/28 Pringle1982
  • Score: 15

3:08pm Mon 19 May 14

Nightblogger says...

Pringle1982 wrote:
Nightblogger wrote:
Reprehensible though this incident undoubtedly is there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside. Dogs should be kept 'under close control', and if necessary, especially near livestock or nesting birds, on a lead. Particularly in the lakes there are plenty of dogs that are very well trained and do not bother sheep or lambs and can walk reliably to heel through a field of livestock. There is no reason why these should be so restricted in the countryside. Of course if your dog is not well trained, is unreliable or unpredictable then that is a different matter.

The worst offenders that regularly allow dogs to chase sheep in the countryside are the Shepherds......
Yes, there is actually:

http://www.legislati

on.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz

2/1-2/28
I stand by exactly what I said and my claim is entirely in accord with the requirement of the Dogs Act that dogs should be on a lead or otherwise under 'close control' when in a field with sheep.
[quote][p][bold]Pringle1982[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Nightblogger[/bold] wrote: Reprehensible though this incident undoubtedly is there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside. Dogs should be kept 'under close control', and if necessary, especially near livestock or nesting birds, on a lead. Particularly in the lakes there are plenty of dogs that are very well trained and do not bother sheep or lambs and can walk reliably to heel through a field of livestock. There is no reason why these should be so restricted in the countryside. Of course if your dog is not well trained, is unreliable or unpredictable then that is a different matter. The worst offenders that regularly allow dogs to chase sheep in the countryside are the Shepherds......[/p][/quote]Yes, there is actually: http://www.legislati on.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz 2/1-2/28[/p][/quote]I stand by exactly what I said and my claim is entirely in accord with the requirement of the Dogs Act that dogs should be on a lead or otherwise under 'close control' when in a field with sheep. Nightblogger
  • Score: -16

11:04am Tue 20 May 14

Pringle1982 says...

Nightblogger wrote:
Pringle1982 wrote:
Nightblogger wrote:
Reprehensible though this incident undoubtedly is there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside. Dogs should be kept 'under close control', and if necessary, especially near livestock or nesting birds, on a lead. Particularly in the lakes there are plenty of dogs that are very well trained and do not bother sheep or lambs and can walk reliably to heel through a field of livestock. There is no reason why these should be so restricted in the countryside. Of course if your dog is not well trained, is unreliable or unpredictable then that is a different matter.

The worst offenders that regularly allow dogs to chase sheep in the countryside are the Shepherds......
Yes, there is actually:

http://www.legislati


on.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz


2/1-2/28
I stand by exactly what I said and my claim is entirely in accord with the requirement of the Dogs Act that dogs should be on a lead or otherwise under 'close control' when in a field with sheep.
Oh sorry, I got confused when you said "there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside"

Silly me reading your statement wrong.
[quote][p][bold]Nightblogger[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Pringle1982[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Nightblogger[/bold] wrote: Reprehensible though this incident undoubtedly is there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside. Dogs should be kept 'under close control', and if necessary, especially near livestock or nesting birds, on a lead. Particularly in the lakes there are plenty of dogs that are very well trained and do not bother sheep or lambs and can walk reliably to heel through a field of livestock. There is no reason why these should be so restricted in the countryside. Of course if your dog is not well trained, is unreliable or unpredictable then that is a different matter. The worst offenders that regularly allow dogs to chase sheep in the countryside are the Shepherds......[/p][/quote]Yes, there is actually: http://www.legislati on.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz 2/1-2/28[/p][/quote]I stand by exactly what I said and my claim is entirely in accord with the requirement of the Dogs Act that dogs should be on a lead or otherwise under 'close control' when in a field with sheep.[/p][/quote]Oh sorry, I got confused when you said "there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside" Silly me reading your statement wrong. Pringle1982
  • Score: 6

1:31pm Tue 20 May 14

Nightblogger says...

Pringle1982 wrote:
Nightblogger wrote:
Pringle1982 wrote:
Nightblogger wrote:
Reprehensible though this incident undoubtedly is there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside. Dogs should be kept 'under close control', and if necessary, especially near livestock or nesting birds, on a lead. Particularly in the lakes there are plenty of dogs that are very well trained and do not bother sheep or lambs and can walk reliably to heel through a field of livestock. There is no reason why these should be so restricted in the countryside. Of course if your dog is not well trained, is unreliable or unpredictable then that is a different matter.

The worst offenders that regularly allow dogs to chase sheep in the countryside are the Shepherds......
Yes, there is actually:

http://www.legislati



on.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz



2/1-2/28
I stand by exactly what I said and my claim is entirely in accord with the requirement of the Dogs Act that dogs should be on a lead or otherwise under 'close control' when in a field with sheep.
Oh sorry, I got confused when you said "there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside"

Silly me reading your statement wrong.
That's OK. The law is perfectly clear, even if I have not been. The Law says that dogs mustn't ever worry livestock and in order to achieve this they must be kept on a lead OR under close control. So if you are certain that they are under close control and won't worry sheep they do not have to be kept on a lead.

Confusion over terms can be avoided by reading here:

http://naturenet.net
/law/dogs.html
[quote][p][bold]Pringle1982[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Nightblogger[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Pringle1982[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Nightblogger[/bold] wrote: Reprehensible though this incident undoubtedly is there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside. Dogs should be kept 'under close control', and if necessary, especially near livestock or nesting birds, on a lead. Particularly in the lakes there are plenty of dogs that are very well trained and do not bother sheep or lambs and can walk reliably to heel through a field of livestock. There is no reason why these should be so restricted in the countryside. Of course if your dog is not well trained, is unreliable or unpredictable then that is a different matter. The worst offenders that regularly allow dogs to chase sheep in the countryside are the Shepherds......[/p][/quote]Yes, there is actually: http://www.legislati on.gov.uk/ukpga/Eliz 2/1-2/28[/p][/quote]I stand by exactly what I said and my claim is entirely in accord with the requirement of the Dogs Act that dogs should be on a lead or otherwise under 'close control' when in a field with sheep.[/p][/quote]Oh sorry, I got confused when you said "there is no legal or moral requirement for dogs to be kept 'on a lead' in the countryside" Silly me reading your statement wrong.[/p][/quote]That's OK. The law is perfectly clear, even if I have not been. The Law says that dogs mustn't ever worry livestock and in order to achieve this they must be kept on a lead OR under close control. So if you are certain that they are under close control and won't worry sheep they do not have to be kept on a lead. Confusion over terms can be avoided by reading here: http://naturenet.net /law/dogs.html Nightblogger
  • Score: -11

6:49pm Wed 21 May 14

zaney5 says...

A dog is NOT under control unless it is on a lead. Dogs are just like any other animal - unpredictable.
I see people walking their dogs along the side of the road without a lead and while they may THINK the dog is under control it is not. What would happen if it sees another animal on the other side of the road and next thing it's under the wheels of a car?
Only way to control your animal is to put it on a lead.
A dog is NOT under control unless it is on a lead. Dogs are just like any other animal - unpredictable. I see people walking their dogs along the side of the road without a lead and while they may THINK the dog is under control it is not. What would happen if it sees another animal on the other side of the road and next thing it's under the wheels of a car? Only way to control your animal is to put it on a lead. zaney5
  • Score: 12

11:04pm Wed 21 May 14

Nightblogger says...

zaney5 wrote:
A dog is NOT under control unless it is on a lead. Dogs are just like any other animal - unpredictable.
I see people walking their dogs along the side of the road without a lead and while they may THINK the dog is under control it is not. What would happen if it sees another animal on the other side of the road and next thing it's under the wheels of a car?
Only way to control your animal is to put it on a lead.
You may THINK that - but that's not what the law says and training is about reducing any unpredictability to a minimal and manageable degree. Only the owner will know whether that particular dog is sufficiently trained to resist temptations - and part of good training tests training out to see how reliable it is. Frankly round my neck of the fells I'm more worried that my dog will get attacked by some of the feisty ewes - and so is he, which is why he trots along reliably at my side when sheep are in sight.

The law says that no offense has been committed so long as my dog does not worry livestock - lead or no. Furthermore I've actually seen a dog ON A LEAD worrying sheep - that owner shouldn't have even even taken his dog into the field!
[quote][p][bold]zaney5[/bold] wrote: A dog is NOT under control unless it is on a lead. Dogs are just like any other animal - unpredictable. I see people walking their dogs along the side of the road without a lead and while they may THINK the dog is under control it is not. What would happen if it sees another animal on the other side of the road and next thing it's under the wheels of a car? Only way to control your animal is to put it on a lead.[/p][/quote]You may THINK that - but that's not what the law says and training is about reducing any unpredictability to a minimal and manageable degree. Only the owner will know whether that particular dog is sufficiently trained to resist temptations - and part of good training tests training out to see how reliable it is. Frankly round my neck of the fells I'm more worried that my dog will get attacked by some of the feisty ewes - and so is he, which is why he trots along reliably at my side when sheep are in sight. The law says that no offense has been committed so long as my dog does not worry livestock - lead or no. Furthermore I've actually seen a dog ON A LEAD worrying sheep - that owner shouldn't have even even taken his dog into the field! Nightblogger
  • Score: -2

8:06pm Thu 22 May 14

jazzactivist says...

Sorry nightblogger, but not every action has to be reduced to the absolute letter of the law. Laws are there as the minimum requirement, but we are all expected to act responsibly 'within the law' which means setting our standards above it so that we don't risk crossing it, especially for safety reasons. No dog is completely under control unless it is on a lead, and every dog can be unpredictable at times.

I have a dog myself, and it is lovely to see a dog running about and enjoying itself and doing what dogs do, but that should be in our own gardens or land. It would be better if all dogs were kept on leads at all times when out in public, not only for the safety of people, livestock, and other dogs, but so that the walker is physically attached to the dog and can easily clean up after it.
Sorry nightblogger, but not every action has to be reduced to the absolute letter of the law. Laws are there as the minimum requirement, but we are all expected to act responsibly 'within the law' which means setting our standards above it so that we don't risk crossing it, especially for safety reasons. No dog is completely under control unless it is on a lead, and every dog can be unpredictable at times. I have a dog myself, and it is lovely to see a dog running about and enjoying itself and doing what dogs do, but that should be in our own gardens or land. It would be better if all dogs were kept on leads at all times when out in public, not only for the safety of people, livestock, and other dogs, but so that the walker is physically attached to the dog and can easily clean up after it. jazzactivist
  • Score: 8

8:21pm Sat 24 May 14

L00pyl00 says...

I have full confidence in my dog but I respect the land owner by keeping my dog on the lead. There may be a right to roam statement in the countryside but the land still belongs to the farmer. I show my wppriciation by keeping my dog on a lead at all times.
I have full confidence in my dog but I respect the land owner by keeping my dog on the lead. There may be a right to roam statement in the countryside but the land still belongs to the farmer. I show my wppriciation by keeping my dog on a lead at all times. L00pyl00
  • Score: 4

11:31am Sun 25 May 14

tictoc1 says...

I feel my dog is extremely well trained but, no one can tell what goes on in his head which makes him unpredictable! So with respect to others and my own peace of mind, he's kept on a lead when around live stock and in public places.
I feel my dog is extremely well trained but, no one can tell what goes on in his head which makes him unpredictable! So with respect to others and my own peace of mind, he's kept on a lead when around live stock and in public places. tictoc1
  • Score: 3

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